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Advanced Materials

Aligned Macroscopic Domains of Optoelectronic Nanostructures Prepared via Shear-Flow Assembly of Peptide Hydrogels

Authors

  • Brian D. Wall,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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    • B.D.W., S.R.D., and S.Z. contributed equally to this work.

  • Stephen R. Diegelmann,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    2. Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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    • Case Western Reserve University, Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering.

  • Shuming Zhang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Thomas J. Dawidczyk,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • William L. Wilson,

    1. Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    3. Integrated Imaging Center (IIC), Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles, St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Howard E. Katz,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    2. Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    3. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Hai-Quan Mao,

    1. Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    3. Translational Tissue Engineering Center and Whitaker Biomedical, Engineering Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
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  • John D. Tovar

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    2. Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    3. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    • Department of Chemistry, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.
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Abstract

A facile technique is reported to prepare globally aligned arrays of self-assembled peptide nanostructures within macroscopic hydrogels starting from a solution of peptide molecules with embedded π-conjugated oligomers. The alignment of the π-stacked conduits within these macrostructures is verified with polarized optical microscopy and leads to anisotropic photophysical and electrical properties.

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