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Direct Attachment of Microbial Organisms to Material Surfaces Through Sequence-Specific DNA Hybridization

Authors

  • Amy A. Twite,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Sciences Division, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460, USA
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  • Sonny C. Hsiao,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Sciences Division, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460, USA
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  • Hiroaki Onoe,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Sciences Division, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460, USA
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  • Richard A. Mathies,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Sciences Division, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460, USA
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  • Matthew B. Francis

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Sciences Division, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460, USA
    • Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Sciences Division, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460, USA.
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Abstract

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A new technique is reported for the attachment of synthetic DNA strands to the surfaces of microbial organisms. This gives algal, bacterial, and fungal cells the ability to bind to complementary strands extending from patterned surfaces that can be produced on platforms such as microfluidic devices. The ability of this method to establish complex 2- and 3-dimensional cocultures comprising multiple organism types is also presented.

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