Self-Assembly in 3D Using Magnetic Levitation: Using Magnetic Levitation for Three Dimensional Self-Assembly (Adv. Mater. 36/2011)

Authors

  • Katherine A. Mirica,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
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  • Filip Ilievski,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
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  • Audrey K. Ellerbee,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
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  • Sergey S. Shevkoplyas,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tulane University, 500 L. Boggs Building, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA
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  • George M. Whitesides

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    2. Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, 3 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    • Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.
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Abstract

original image

The image shows three plastic components (cut from a polymethylmethacrylate sheet using a laser cutter to form the letters G, M, and W) levitating in an aqueous solution of MnCl2 between two NdFeB magnets. The letters have a preprogrammed distribution of densi-ties, which is achieved by applying tapes with different densities to their surfaces. As reported by George M. Whitesides and co-workers on page 4134, the balance of magnetic and gravitational forces acting on the letters controls their vertical position and orientation. Digital photography by Emilie Izquierdo.

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