Supramolecular Materials: Aligned Macroscopic Domains of Optoelectronic Nanostructures Prepared via Shear-Flow Assembly of Peptide Hydrogels (Adv. Mater. 43/2011)

Authors

  • Brian D. Wall,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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    • B.D.W., S.R.D., and S.Z. contributed equally to this work.

  • Stephen R. Diegelmann,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    2. Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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    • Case Western Reserve University, Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering.

  • Shuming Zhang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Thomas J. Dawidczyk,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • William L. Wilson,

    1. Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    3. Integrated Imaging Center (IIC), Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles, St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Howard E. Katz,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    2. Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    3. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Hai-Quan Mao,

    1. Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    3. Translational Tissue Engineering Center and Whitaker Biomedical, Engineering Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
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  • John D. Tovar

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    2. Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    3. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    • Department of Chemistry, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.
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Abstract

original image

An assembly process whereby solutions of π-conjugated peptide molecules are fashioned into macroscale hydrogel noodles through a simple solution dispensing technique is reported by John D. Tovar and co-workers on page 5009. This method allows one-step manipulation of molecular species into 1D nanostructures that are themselves globally aligned within the noodle architecture. Art-work by Shawna Garcia.

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