Advanced Materials

Self-Assembled Peptide Amphiphile Micelles Containing a Cytotoxic T-Cell Epitope Promote a Protective Immune Response In Vivo

Authors

  • Matthew Black,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. These authors contributed equally to this work
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  • Amanda Trent,

    1. Biomolecular Science and Engineering Program, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. These authors contributed equally to this work
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  • Yulia Kostenko,

    1. Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94709, USA
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  • Joseph Saeyong Lee,

    1. Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94709, USA
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  • Colleen Olive,

    1. Immunity and Vaccinology Laboratory, The Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane QLD 4029, Australia
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  • Matthew Tirrell

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Searle Chemistry Laboratory, Room 402, 5735 South Ellis, Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    • Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Searle Chemistry Laboratory, Room 402, 5735 South Ellis, Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.
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Abstract

A model cytotoxic T-cell epitope is linked to a synthetic lipid tail, forming a peptide amphiphile that self-assembles into cylindrical micelles. The micelles are capable of inducing a cytotoxic T-cell response in mice that slows the growth of tumors expressing the tumor antigen.

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