Advanced Materials

Wire Metamaterials: Physics and Applications

Authors

  • Constantin R. Simovski,

    1. National Research University of Information, Technologies, Mechanics, and Optics (ITMO), St. Petersburg 197101, Russia
    2. Aalto University, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland
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  • Pavel A. Belov,

    1. National Research University of Information, Technologies, Mechanics, and Optics (ITMO), St. Petersburg 197101, Russia
    2. Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS, UK
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  • Alexander V. Atrashchenko,

    1. National Research University of Information, Technologies, Mechanics, and Optics (ITMO), St. Petersburg 197101, Russia
    2. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian, Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021, Russia
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  • Yuri S. Kivshar

    Corresponding author
    1. National Research University of Information, Technologies, Mechanics, and Optics (ITMO), St. Petersburg 197101, Russia
    2. Nonlinear Physics Center and Centre for Ultrahigh-bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia
    • National Research University of Information, Technologies, Mechanics, and Optics (ITMO), St. Petersburg 197101, Russia.
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Abstract

The physics and applications of a broad class of artificial electromagnetic materials composed of lattices of aligned metal rods embedded in a dielectric matrix are reviewed. Such structures are here termed wire metamaterials. They appear in various settings and can operate from microwaves to THz and optical frequencies. An important group of these metamaterials is a wire medium possessing extreme optical anisotropy. The study of wire metamaterials has a long history, however, most of their important and useful properties have been revealed and understood only recently, especially in the THz and optical frequency ranges where the wire media correspond to the lattices of microwires and nanowires, respectively. Another group of wire metamaterials are arrays and lattices of nanorods of noble metals whose unusual properties are driven by plasmonic resonances.

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