“Cut and Stick” Rubbery Ion Gels as High Capacitance Gate Dielectrics

Authors

  • Keun Hyung Lee,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
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  • Moon Sung Kang,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743, Korea
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  • Sipei Zhang,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
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  • Yuanyan Gu,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
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  • Timothy P. Lodge,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    • Departments of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
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  • C. Daniel Frisbie

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    • Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.
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Abstract

original image

A free-standing polymer electrolyte called an ion gel is employed in both organic and inorganic thin-film transistors as a high capacitance gate dielectric. To prepare a transistor, the free-standing ion gel is simply laid over a semiconductor channel and a side-gate electrode, which is possible because of the gel's high mechanical strength.

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