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Transfer Printing Techniques for Materials Assembly and Micro/Nanodevice Fabrication

Authors

  • Andrew Carlson,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Audrey M. Bowen,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Yonggang Huang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA
    • Yonggang Huang, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA

      Ralph G. Nuzzo, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA

      John A. Rogers, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.

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  • Ralph G. Nuzzo,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
    • Yonggang Huang, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA

      Ralph G. Nuzzo, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA

      John A. Rogers, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.

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  • John A. Rogers

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
    • Yonggang Huang, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA

      Ralph G. Nuzzo, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA

      John A. Rogers, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.

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Abstract

Transfer printing represents a set of techniques for deterministic assembly of micro-and nanomaterials into spatially organized, functional arrangements with two and three-dimensional layouts. Such processes provide versatile routes not only to test structures and vehicles for scientific studies but also to high-performance, heterogeneously integrated functional systems, including those in flexible electronics, three-dimensional and/or curvilinear optoelectronics, and bio-integrated sensing and therapeutic devices. This article summarizes recent advances in a variety of transfer printing techniques, ranging from the mechanics and materials aspects that govern their operation to engineering features of their use in systems with varying levels of complexity. A concluding section presents perspectives on opportunities for basic and applied research, and on emerging use of these methods in high throughput, industrial-scale manufacturing.

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