Advanced Materials

Analog Applications of Photochemical Switches

Authors

  • Graeme Copley,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Thomas A. Moore,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    • Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ana L. Moore,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    • Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Devens Gust

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    • Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Molecules that change their structure in response to a stimulus such as light or an added chemical can act as molecular switches. Such switches can be chemically linked to other active moieties to create molecular “devices” for various purposes. There has been much activity of late in the use of molecular switches such as photochromes in the construction of molecular logic gates that carry out binary or digital functions. However, ensembles of such molecules can also act as analog devices. Here, examples of a molecular photonic signal transducer and two mimics of photosynthetic photoregulatory processes are discussed.

Ancillary