Advances in Supramolecular Electronics – From Randomly Self-assembled Nanostructures to Addressable Self-Organized Interconnects

Authors

  • Emilie Moulin,

    1. SAMS Research Group–icFRC, Institut Charles Sadron, CNRS–UPR 22, 23 rue du Loess, BP 84087, 67034 Strasbourg cedex 2, France
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  • Juan-José Cid,

    1. SAMS Research Group–icFRC, Institut Charles Sadron, CNRS–UPR 22, 23 rue du Loess, BP 84087, 67034 Strasbourg cedex 2, France
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Américo Vespucio, 49, Isla de la Cartuja, 41092 Sevilla, Spain
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  • Nicolas Giuseppone

    Corresponding author
    1. SAMS Research Group–icFRC, Institut Charles Sadron, CNRS–UPR 22, 23 rue du Loess, BP 84087, 67034 Strasbourg cedex 2, France
    2. University of Strasbourg, 1 rue Blaise Pascal 67000 Strasbourg, France
    • SAMS Research Group–icFRC, Institut Charles Sadron, CNRS–UPR 22, 23 rue du Loess, BP 84087, 67034 Strasbourg cedex 2, France.
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Abstract

Supramolecular organic electronics rests on the use of bottom-up chemical self-assembly processes in order to design conducting components on the 5–100 nm scale. The challenges in this field are both the construction of 1D-nanostructures displaying optimized transport properties and their precise connections to electrodes. The present Research News highlights important advances in such materials regarding their electrical performances, from semiconductors to organic metals, but also regarding their processability. In particular, by externally controlling light-responsive supramolecular polymerization processes, and by using appropriate methods of casting with an applied electric field, it becomes possible to pre-determine the accurate positioning of organic interconnects within patterned nano-circuitry. These strategies using external stimuli to obtain addressability, thus hold promising alternatives to other conducting materials such as carbon nanotubes for further technological applications in nanosciences.

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