Advanced Materials

Bistable Large-Strain Actuation of Interpenetrating Polymer Networks

Authors

  • Xiaofan Niu,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, California, 90095, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Xinguo Yang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, California, 90095, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Paul Brochu,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, California, 90095, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hristiyan Stoyanov,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, California, 90095, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sungryul Yun,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, California, 90095, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Zhibin Yu,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, California, 90095, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Qibing Pei

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, California, 90095, USA
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, California, 90095, USA.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The bistable electroactive polymer is a new smart material capable of large strain, rigid-to-rigid actuation. At the rubbery state of the polymer heated to above its glass transition, stable electrically-induced actuation is obtained at strains as large as 150%. Electromechanical instability can be effectively overcome by the formation of interpenetrating polymer networks. An application as a refreshable braille display is demonstrated.

original image

Ancillary