Advanced Materials

A Selenium-Substituted Low-Bandgap Polymer with Versatile Photovoltaic Applications

Authors

  • Letian Dou,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    2. California Nano Systems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. These authors contributed equally to this work.
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  • Wei-Hsuan Chang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    2. California Nano Systems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. These authors contributed equally to this work.
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  • Jing Gao,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
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  • Chun-Chao Chen,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
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  • Jingbi You,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
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  • Yang Yang

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    2. California Nano Systems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
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Abstract

A reduction of the bandgap and an enhancement of the charge transport properties of a LBG polymer (PBDTT-DPP) can be achieved simultaneously by changing the sulfur atoms on the DPP unit to selenium atoms. The newly designed polymer, PBDTT-SeDPP (Eg = 1.38 eV), shows excellent photovoltaic performance in single junction devices with power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) over 7% and photo-response up to 900 nm. A tandem polymer solar cell and a visibly transparent solar cell based on PBDTT-SeDPP show 9.5% and 4.5% PCEs, which are superior to those based on PBDTT-DPP.

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