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Superhydrophobic Surfaces by Electrochemical Processes

Authors

  • Thierry Darmanin,

    1. Université de Nice–Sophia Antipolis & CNRS, Laboratoire Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), Groupe Surfaces et Interfaces, 28 avenue Valrose, Nice cedex 2, 06108, France
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  • Elisabeth Taffin de Givenchy,

    1. Université de Nice–Sophia Antipolis & CNRS, Laboratoire Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), Groupe Surfaces et Interfaces, 28 avenue Valrose, Nice cedex 2, 06108, France
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  • Sonia Amigoni,

    1. Université de Nice–Sophia Antipolis & CNRS, Laboratoire Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), Groupe Surfaces et Interfaces, 28 avenue Valrose, Nice cedex 2, 06108, France
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  • Frederic Guittard

    Corresponding author
    1. Université de Nice–Sophia Antipolis & CNRS, Laboratoire Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), Groupe Surfaces et Interfaces, 28 avenue Valrose, Nice cedex 2, 06108, France
    • Université de Nice–Sophia Antipolis & CNRS, Laboratoire Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), Groupe Surfaces et Interfaces, 28 avenue Valrose, Nice cedex 2, 06108, France.
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Abstract

This review is an exhaustive representation of the electrochemical processes reported in the literature to produce superhydrophobic surfaces. Due to the intensive demand in the elaboration of superhydrophobic materials using low-cost, reproducible and fast methods, the use of strategies based on electrochemical processes have exponentially grown these last five years. These strategies are separated in two parts: the oxidation processes, such as oxidation of metals in solution, the anodization of metals or the electrodeposition of conducting polymers, and the reduction processed such as the electrodeposition of metals or the galvanic deposition. One of the main advantages of the electrochemical processes is the relative easiness to produce various surface morphologies and a precise control of the structures at a micro- or a nanoscale.

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