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Can Polymorphism be Used to form Branched Metal Nanostructures?

Authors

  • Alec P. LaGrow,

    1. School of Chemical and Physical Sciences and The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, 6012, New Zealand
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  • Soshan Cheong,

    1. School of Chemical and Physical Sciences and The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, 6012, New Zealand
    2. Industrial Research Limited, P.O. Box 31-310, Lower Hutt 5040, New Zealand
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  • John Watt,

    1. School of Chemical and Physical Sciences and The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, 6012, New Zealand
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  • Bridget Ingham,

    1. Industrial Research Limited, P.O. Box 31-310, Lower Hutt 5040, New Zealand
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  • Michael F. Toney,

    1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA
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  • David A. Jefferson,

    1. University of Cambridge Chemical Laboratories, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW, UK
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  • Richard D. Tilley

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemical and Physical Sciences and The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, 6012, New Zealand
    • School of Chemical and Physical Sciences and The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, 6012, New Zealand.
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Abstract

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Branched metal nanostructures are of great technological importance because of their unique size- and shape-dependent properties. A kinetically controlled synthesis that uses polymorphism to produce branched nickel nanoparticles is presented. These nanoparticles consist of a face-centred cubic (fcc) core and extended arms of alternating fcc and hexagonal close-packed (hcp) nickel phases.

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