Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 18 Issue 20

October, 2006

Volume 18, Issue 20

Pages 2651–2790

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Index
    1. Cover Picture: Protein Detecting Arrays Based on Cationic Polythiophene–DNA-Aptamer Complexes (Adv. Mater. 20/2006)

      M. Béra Abérem, A. Najari, H.-A. Ho, J.-F. Gravel, P. Nobert, D. Boudreau and M. Leclerc

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200690082

      By combining an appropriate DNA aptamer with a cationic polythiophene optical transducer, human thrombin can be specifically detected on microarrays in the attomole range in less than one hour without any tagging of the target. The system can be modified and utilized as a probe for the detection of various proteins or other biomolecules. This work opens new interesting possibilities for simple and rapid multiparametric analysis in genomics and proteomics.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Index
    1. Inside Front Cover: Efficient Top-Gate, Ambipolar, Light-Emitting Field-Effect Transistors Based on a Green-Light-Emitting Polyfluorene (Adv. Mater. 20/2006)

      J. Zaumseil, C. L. Donley, J.-S. Kim, R. H. Friend and H. Sirringhaus

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200690083

      Bright, ambipolar, light-emitting polymer field-effect transistors in a bottom-contact/top-gate structure using poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorene-alt- benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) as a green-emitting semiconductor show balanced hole and electron mobilities, depending on the polymer dielectric. The emission zone, observed as a bright line in the figure, is well defined and can be moved through the channel.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Index
  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Quality Counts (pages 2661–2663)

      D. Flanagan and L. Wylie

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602150

      Quality of information: As another exciting year in materials science draws to a conclusion, this Editorial surveys the topics making an impact and the advances the journal has made in maintaining our commitment to bringing our readers the very best in materials research.

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Index
    1. Introducing Defects in 3D Photonic Crystals: State of the Art (pages 2665–2678)

      P. V. Braun, S. A. Rinne and F. García-Santamaría

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200600769

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The design and fabrication of defects in 3D photonic bandgap materials are reviewed. Defect formation has been achieved in photonic crystals though a diverse set of fabrication and modeling techniques. Future directions and challenges in the formation of designed defects are also discussed. The figure shows a fluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy image of a y-splitter defect formed through two-photon polymerization within a colloidal photonic crystal.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Index
    1. Three-Dimensional Biochemical and Biomechanical Patterning of Hydrogels for Guiding Cell Behavior (pages 2679–2684)

      M. S. Hahn, J. S. Miller and J. L. West

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200600647

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The ability to spatially tailor material biomechanical and biochemical properties at the microscale and to create freeform 3D patterns and gradients within existing photoactive networks (see figure) is demonstrated. The ability of patterned substrates to guide cell migration is also shown.

    2. Nanoscale ZnO-Enhanced Fluorescence Detection of Protein Interactions (pages 2685–2690)

      A. Dorfman, N. Kumar and J. Hahm

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200502616

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Enhanced fluorescence emission is detected from interacting protein pairs of dichlorotriazinylaminofluorescein-streptavidin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin (see figure) that are adsorbed onto periodically spaced, square-patterned ZnO nanostructures. This florescence-enhancement capability of nanoscale ZnO and its potential easy integration into biosensor arrays may allow ultrasensitive protein detection, which is needed in the areas of biomedical research and in large-scale testing and screening.

    3. Highly Oriented Thin-Film Microdomain Patterns of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Block Copolymers via Directional Solidification of a Solvent (pages 2691–2694)

      J. Yoon, W. Lee and E. L. Thomas

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200600741

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Excellent control of the thin-film microdomain orientation of lamellar- (LAM) and cylinder- (CYL) forming ultrahigh molecular weight block copolymers has been obtained over a large area via directional solidification of a crystallizable solvent. 3D optical imaging of the microdomains via laser scanning confocal microscopy (see figure) directly show an intriguing orientation of the intermaterial dividing surfaces (IMDSs).

    4. Manipulating Magnetoresistance Near Room Temperature in La0.67Sr0.33MnO3/La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 Films Prepared by Polymer Assisted Deposition (pages 2695–2698)

      M. Jain, P. Shukla, Y. Li, M. F. Hundley, H. Wang, S. R. Foltyn, A. K. Burrell, T. M. McCleskey and Q. X. Jia

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601221

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multilayer-coated La0.67Sr0.33MnO3/La0.67Ca0.33MnO3(LSMO/LCMO) films can be prepared using cost-effective polymer assisted deposition, keeping a constant LSMO/LCMO volume ratio. By changing the thickness of the individual layers (see figure), the temperature of maximum resistance and the magnitude of magnetoresistance values can be manipulated. Similar properties are not achieved by simply mixing LSMO with LCMO phases at the same volume ratio.

    5. Deformable Antireflection Coatings from Polymer and Nanoparticle Multilayers (pages 2699–2702)

      Z. Wu, J. Walish, A. Nolte, L. Zhai, R. E. Cohen and M. F. Rubner

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601438

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Antireflection (AR) coatings that retain favorable optical properties during the deformation of a flexible lens have been prepared by depositing silica nanoparticles and poly(diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride) on polydimethylsiloxane substrates via layer-by-layer assembly (see figure, 5 μm × 5 μm). Only a modest drop in transmission levels was observed during lens deformation, indicating that nanoparticle-containing multilayers can function as deformable AR coatings.

    6. Protein Detecting Arrays Based on Cationic Polythiophene–DNA-Aptamer Complexes (pages 2703–2707)

      M. Béra Abérem, A. Najari, H.-A. Ho, J.-F. Gravel, P. Nobert, D. Boudreau and M. Leclerc

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601651

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By combining an appropriate DNA aptamer with a cationic polythiophene optical transducer, human thrombin can be specifically detected on microarrays in the attomole range in less than one hour without any tagging of the target. The system can be modified and utilized as a probe for the detection of various proteins or other biomolecules. This work opens new interesting possibilities for simple and rapid multiparametric analysis in genomics and proteomics.

    7. Efficient Top-Gate, Ambipolar, Light-Emitting Field-Effect Transistors Based on a Green-Light-Emitting Polyfluorene (pages 2708–2712)

      J. Zaumseil, C. L. Donley, J.-S. Kim, R. H. Friend and H. Sirringhaus

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601080

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bright, ambipolar, light-emitting polymer field-effect transistors in a bottom-contact/top-gate structure using poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorene-alt- benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) as a green-emitting semiconductor show balanced hole and electron mobilities, depending on the polymer dielectric. The emission zone, observed as a bright line in the figure, is well defined and can be moved through the channel.

    8. Suppression of Energy-Transfer Between Conjugated Polymers in a Ternary Blend Identified Using Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy (pages 2713–2719)

      A. Cadby, R. Dean, R. A. L. Jones and D. G. Lidzey

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200600114

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Scanning near-field optical microscopy (see figure) has been employed to study energy transfer within a ternary blend of the conjugated polymers poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (F8), poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT), and the saturated polymer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Although the morphology of such phase-separated blends resembles that of simple binary systems composed of a saturated and a unsaturated polymer, it was found that energy transfer between F8 and F8BT is significantly hindered by the diluting effect of the PMMA.

    9. UV Electroluminescence Emission from ZnO Light-Emitting Diodes Grown by High-Temperature Radiofrequency Sputtering (pages 2720–2724)

      J.-H. Lim, C.-K. Kang, K.-K. Kim, I.-K. Park, D.-K. Hwang and S.-J. Park

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200502633

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A UV-light-emitting homojunction ZnO LED is grown by radiofrequency sputtering at high temperature, improving the structural, electrical, and optical properties of the n- and p-type ZnO layers. The figure shows a comparison of the electroluminescence spectra of A) a p–n homojunction ZnO LED and B) a ZnO LED with Mg0.1Zn0.9O layers used as energy barrier layers. Such materials are of interest for their potential use in long-lifetime solid-state lighting, high-density information storage, secure communication, and chemical/biological-agent monitoring.

    10. Reversible Thermoresponsive Recording of Fluorescent Images (TRF) (pages 2725–2729)

      S. Hirata and T. Watanabe

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200600209

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nondestructive readout by an excitation light with high fluorescence contrast has been achieved using red, green, and blue fluorescent dyes (see figure). Reversible thermoresponsive recording of fluorescent images (TRF) using a molecularly doped matrix made up of a fluorescent dye, a leuco dye, and a developer is reported.

    11. Waterborne, Nanocomposite Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives with High Tack Energy, Optical Transparency, and Electrical Conductivity (pages 2730–2734)

      T. Wang, C.-H. Lei, A. B. Dalton, C. Creton, Y. Lin, K. A. S. Fernando, Y.-P. Sun, M. Manea, J. M. Asua and J. L. Keddie

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601335

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transparent and conductive pressure-sensitive adhesives are cast from aqueous colloidal dispersions of poly(butyl acrylate) (P(BuA)) and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). At the percolation threshold for network formation (at only 0.3 wt % functionalized CNT), the nanotubes remarkably double the amount of strain at adhesive failure and increase the adhesion energy by 85 % (see figure). The tack properties are explained by current models of adhesive debonding.

    12. Mesoporous Carbon Nanocapsules from Enzymatically Polymerized Poly(4-ethylphenol) Confined in Silica Aerosol Particles (pages 2735–2738)

      T. Zheng, J. Zhan, J. Pang, G. S. Tan, J. He, G. L. McPherson, Y. Lu and V. T. John

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200600808

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mesoporous carbon nanocapsules (see figure) have been synthesized through the direct carbonization of silica aerosol particles encapsulating enzymatically polymerized poly(4-ethylphenol) and subsequent removal of silica. This method provides a simple and efficient approach to synthesize mesoporous carbon nanocapsules using an environmentally benign biocatalyzed carbon precursor.

    13. Toward Amorphous Conductors: Enhanced Conductivity of Doped Polyaniline via Interchain Crosslinking Promoted by Acid-Functionalized Aluminum Quinolines (pages 2739–2742)

      M. Massi, C. Albonetti, M. Facchini, M. Cavallini and F. Biscarini

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200600465

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polyaniline is doped with an Alq3 homologue endowed with sulfonic acid functionalities. The design of the dopant, which favors the formation of a crosslinked network between the polymer chains, along with its semiconducting electrical properties, highly enhance charge transport inside the amorphous phase of the material (see figure).

    14. Reversible Exchange of Tl and Hg Cations on the Superconducting “1212” Lattice (pages 2743–2746)

      Z. Xing, H. Zhao and J. Z. Wu

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200600105

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The synthesis of epitaxial thin films of HgBa2CaCu2O6 via a Hg–Tl cation exchange is reported (see figure). The mechanism of the newly developed, reversible Hg–Tl cation exchange is explored. The simple mechanism of the cation exchange may provide a generic “atomic surgery”, and the process may be useful for the synthesis and epitaxy of elusive volatile material, and used to search for new volatile material from existing precursor materials.

    15. Self-Assembled Growth of BiFeO3–CoFe2O4 Nanostructures (pages 2747–2752)

      H. Zheng, F. Straub, Q. Zhan, P.-L. Yang, W.-K. Hsieh, F. Zavaliche, Y.-H. Chu, U. Dahmen and R. Ramesh

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601215

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      3D heteroepitaxial growth of BiFeO3-CoFe2O4 nanostructures leads to unique morphological patterns depending on the substrate orientations. The morphologies of the BiFeO3-CoFe2O4 nanostructures, estimated using the Winterbottom construction (see figure), are dependent on the different nucleation modes that result from the differences in surface energy anisotropy. The dimensions of the BiFeO3-CoFe2O4 nanostructures increase as the growth temperature increases and decrease as the growth rate increases.

    16. Bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene Charge-Transfer Salt Nanotube Arrays (pages 2753–2757)

      H.-X. Ji, J.-S. Hu, Q.-X. Tang, W.-P. Hu, W.-G. Song and L.-J. Wan

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200600398

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      β″-(BEDT-TTF)4[H2O·Fe(C2O4)3]· C6H5NO2nanotube arrays with uniform size and a highly ordered arrangement are fabricated via an electrocrystallization process on porous anodic aluminum oxide template. The current–voltage characteristics of nanotube arrays and single nanotubes as well as the temperature dependence of the resistance of the nanotube arrays are reported. This method is an important step toward the development of nanoscale electronic devices and chemical sensors based on these organic materials.

    17. Silicone Nanofilaments and Their Application as Superhydrophobic Coatings (pages 2758–2762)

      G. R. J. Artus, S. Jung, J. Zimmermann, H.-P. Gautschi, K. Marquardt and S. Seeger

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200502030

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silicone nanofilaments (see figure) are grown by a simple chemical vapor deposition method on different substrate materials. The filaments are flexible, and have lengths of up to several micrometers and diameters of up to 150 nm. The dense and entangled arrangement of these filaments yields a superhydrophobic coating that is also optically transparent and antireflective.

    18. Polyacylation of Single-Walled Nanotubes under Friedel–Crafts Conditions: An Efficient Method for Functionalizing, Purifying, Decorating, and Linking Carbon Allotropes (pages 2763–2767)

      T. S. Balaban, M. C. Balaban, S. Malik, F. Hennrich, R. Fischer, H. Rösner and M. M. Kappes

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200600138

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new way of purifying and separating single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs, see figure) comes in the form of an efficient polyacylation using Friedel–Crafts catalysts in either nitrobenzene as a solvent or in a NaCl/AlCl3 melt. The report method provides a way for the efficient insertion not only of normal acyl chains but also of perfluorinated acyl residues or for crosslinking possibilities by using α,ω-diacyl dichlorides.

    19. Quantum Dot Thin Layers Templated on ZnO Inverse Opals (pages 2768–2772)

      P. D. García, Á. Blanco, A. Shavel, N. Gaponik, A. Eychmüller, B. Rodríguez-González, L. M. Liz-Marzán and C. López

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200600376

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel composite material integrating ZnO and semiconductor colloidal quantum dots (QDs) in a photonic crystal (see figure) is fabricated by accurate infiltration in two hierarchical steps of colloidal self-assembly. The presence of a high-energy photonic gap has a strong effect on the QD spontaneous emission. A further progressive infiltration with more ZnO is useful to tune this photonic effect through the photoluminescence emission spectrum.

  7. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Index
    1. Dendritic Gels—Many Arms Make Light Work (pages 2773–2778)

      D. K. Smith

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200600474

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multiple functional groups: The fractal nature of dendritic branching (see figure) offers unique advantages when applied in materials chemistry, providing multiple points of interaction and the possibility of multifunctional behavior, such as the formation of gels.

    2. Perfecting Imperfection—Designer Defects in Colloidal Photonic Crystals (pages 2779–2785)

      A. Arsenault, F. Fleischhaker, G. von Freymann, V. Kitaev, H. Miguez, A. Mihi, N. Tétreault, E. Vekris, I. Manners, S. Aitchison, D. Perovic and G. A. Ozin

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601332

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Defects in colloidal photonic crystals (see figure) add custom-engineered functionality to their fascinating optical properties. The state of the art of this exciting field is reviewed, starting from basic principles and spanning fabrication, optical characterization, and numerical simulation as well as chemical functionalization.

  8. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Index
  9. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Index

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