Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 19 Issue 13

July, 2007

Volume 19, Issue 13

Pages 1655–1778

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. Cover Picture: Magnetorheological Fluids Based on Ionic Liquids (Adv. Mater. 13/2007)

      C. Guerrero-Sanchez, T. Lara-Ceniceros, E. Jimenez-Regalado, M. Raşa and U. S. Schubert

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200790048

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The outstanding properties of ionic liquids are combined with magnetorheological technology to obtain new and “smart” fluids (see figure and cover) that can be applied in diverse areas of research and technology, such as medical therapies (drug delivery and cancer therapeutic methods), engineering devices (dampers and breaks), and accurate transportation and delivery of substances in multiphase biological and chemical systems.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. Contents: Adv. Mater. 13/2007 (pages 1655–1662)

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200790045

  3. Correction

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Self-Assembled Electroluminescent Polymers Derived from Terpyridine-Based Moieties (page 1662)

      J. Ji, J. Fu and J. Shen

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200790046

      This article corrects:

      Fabrication of a Superhydrophobic Surface from the Amplified Exponential Growth of a Multilayer1

      Vol. 18, Issue 11, 1441–1444, Article first published online: 26 APR 2006

    2. You have free access to this content
      Optical Detection of Mercury(II) in Aqueous Solutions by Using Conjugated Polymers and Label-Free Oligonucleotides (page 1662)

      X. Liu, Y. Tang, L. Wang, J. Zhang, S. Song, C. Fan and S. Wang

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200790049

      This article corrects:
  4. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. Metallo-Supramolecular Block Copolymers (pages 1665–1673)

      C.-A. Fustin, P. Guillet, U. S. Schubert and J.-F. Gohy

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602170

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Supramolecular copolymers have been a focal point of research towards new materials with tunable properties in the past few years. This Progress Report describes recent developments achieved in the field of metallo-supramolecular block copolymers, that is, copolymers in which the blocks are linked together by a metal–ligand complex. The synthesis and self-assembly of linear (see figure) and starlike architectures are discussed.

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. The Development of Light-Emitting Dendrimers for Displays (pages 1675–1688)

      P. L. Burn, S.-C. Lo and I. D. W. Samuel

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601592

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      Light-emitting dendrimers (see figure) are a new class of solution-processed emissive material for use in organic light-emitting diodes. This Review tracks their development from the first report through to the state-of-the-art phosphorescent dendrimers that give rise to highly efficient devices.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. Filling Fraction Dependent Properties of Inverse Opal Metallic Photonic Crystals (pages 1689–1692)

      X. Yu, Y.-J. Lee, R. Furstenberg, J. O. White and P. V. Braun

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602792

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nickel inverse opals with controlled metal filling fraction are fabricated through a combination of colloidal crystal templated electrodeposition and electropolishing (see figure). Optical measurements demonstrate that both reflection and emission are significantly modified by the photonic structure. The optical properties are truly three dimensional only at low metal filling fractions (after electropolishing).

    2. Luminescent Open Metal Sites within a Metal–Organic Framework for Sensing Small Molecules (pages 1693–1696)

      B. Chen, Y. Yang, F. Zapata, G. Lin, G. Qian and E. B. Lobkovsky

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601838

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Luminescent open metal sites within a microporous Eu(BTC) (see figure, BTC = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) metal–organic framework are used for binding and sensing small molecules. The small molecules, such as dimethyl formamide, acetone, and ethanol exhibit different enhancing and quenching effects on the luminescence intensity of Eu(BTC). These specific properties may allow the use of such frameworks as sensors for small molecules.

    3. Nanostructured Morphologies and Topologies of π-Conjugated Polymers from Thermally Reactive Polymer Blends (pages 1697–1702)

      X. Han, X. Chen and S. Holdcroft

      Article first published online: 25 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601828

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nano- and microstructured architectures of π-conjugated polymers (see figure) are obtained by solution-casting blends of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and a conjugated polymer bearing solubilizing tetrahydropyranyl groups followed by thermally induced, solid-phase deprotection of the conjugated polymer and subsequent dissolution of PMMA.

    4. Tuning the Crystal Structure and Magnetic Properties of FePt Nanomagnets (pages 1703–1706)

      J.-M. Qiu and J.-P. Wang

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602374

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Structure tuning of FePt nanomagnets is achieved by using a gas-phase condensation technique (see figure). Three types of FePt nanomagnets, A1 phase icosahedron, A1 phase octahedron, and L10 phase octahedron, with uniform size distributions are produced by directly manipulating the thermal environments for the nucleation and growth. The different magnetic performances of these nanomagnets are consistent with their structure variances.

    5. Growth and Optical Properties of Highly Uniform and Periodic InGaN Nanostructures (pages 1707–1710)

      P. Chen, A. Chen, S. J. Chua and J. N. Tan

      Article first published online: 5 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602110

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      InGaN nanodot arrays with improved optical properties, attributed to the strong localization of photogenerated carriers in the size-homogeneous nanodots, grown by nanoscale selective area epitaxy (NSAE) on electron-beam lithographically patterned templates are presented. The figure shows an array of 60 nm diameter cone-shaped InGaN nanodots with 200 nm spacing, and a single nanodot (inset).

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Growth and Optical Properties of Highly Uniform and Periodic InGaN Nanostructures

      Vol. 19, Issue 24, 4325, Article first published online: 11 DEC 2007

    6. High-Throughput Characterization of Metal Electrode Performance for Electric-Field-Induced Resistance Switching in Metal/Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3/Metal Structures (pages 1711–1713)

      K. Tsubouchi, I. Ohkubo, H. Kumigashira, M. Oshima, Y. Matsumoto, K. Itaka, T. Ohnishi, M. Lippmaa and H. Koinuma

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601957

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-throughput exploration of electrode materials is demonstrated with an epitaxial thin-film device to determine the appropriate electrode materials for a resistance random access memory. In I–V measurements, only electrode pairs containing Al showed resistance switching (see figure). The disappearance of switching in the four-probe measurements suggests that switching occurs near the interface of the Al electrode and the Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3 film.

    7. High-Resolution Patterning of Aluminum Thin Films with a Water-Mediated Transfer Process (pages 1714–1718)

      B. H. Lee, Y. H. Cho, H. Lee, K.-D. Lee, S. H. Kim and M. M. Sung

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601884

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Water-mediated nanotransfer printing (nTP) is based on the direct transfer of a metal thin film from a stamp to a substrate via water-mediated surface bonding between the stamp and the substrate. The procedure can generate aluminum patterns with feature sizes as small as 60 nm (see figure). The transferred Al patterns are chemically bound to the substrate surface and, thus, exhibit strong adhesion.

    8. Multifunctional Macroarchitectures of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube Fibers (pages 1719–1723)

      L. Ci, N. Punbusayakul, J. Wei, R. Vajtai, S. Talapatra and P. M. Ajayan

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602520

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple and scalable drawing–drying process for spinning pure double walled carbon nanotube (DWNT) fibers out of DWNT cotton is reported (see figure). Fibers with lengths up to tens of centimeters can be spun, and these fibers possess high mechanical strength. Field emission and electrochemical tests performed on individual DWNT fibers reveal the possibility of using the DWNT fibers as components in various device architectures.

    9. Controlling Cell Adhesion to Titanium: Functionalization of Poly[oligo(ethylene glycol)methacrylate] Brushes with Cell-Adhesive Peptides (pages 1724–1728)

      J. E. Raynor, T. A. Petrie, A. J. García and D. M. Collard

      Article first published online: 25 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602129

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A monolayer of 11-(2-bromo-2-methyl)propionyloxy)undecenyldimethylchlorosilane on titanium serves as an initiator for surface-initiated atom-transfer polymerization of (oligoethylene glycol) methacrylate (OEGMA) to prepare poly(OEGMA) brushes. The polymer brush affords resistance to adhesion of osteoblastic cells. Treatment of the brush-modified surface with 4-nitrophenyl chloroformate followed by a GFOGER-containing peptide promotes cell adhesion, thereby representing a strategy to impart biofunctionality to titanium (see figure) and thereby promote osseointegration.

    10. Grafted 2D Assembly of Colloidal Metal Nanoparticles for Application as a Variable Capacitor (pages 1729–1733)

      N. Lidgi-Guigui, C. Dablemont, D. Veautier, G. Viau, P. Seneor, F. Nguyen Van Dau, C. Mangeney, A. Vaurès, C. Deranlot and A. Friederich

      Article first published online: 25 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602866

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A combination of sputtering and colloidal chemistry is employed to prepare [Co/Al2O3//Ru nanoparticles//Al2O3/Co] junctions (see figure). These junctions are applied as variable capacitors relying on Coulomb blockades in a 2D assembly of nanoparticles. AC measurements show a significant capacitance variation as a function of applied DC voltage with a maximum of relative variation value that is proportional to the particle density embedded in the dielectric layer and is in good agreement with the theoretical model.

    11. Ionic Nanowires at 600 °C: Using Nanoarchitecture to Optimize Electrical Transport in Nanocrystalline Gadolinium-Doped Ceria (pages 1734–1739)

      C. Laberty-Robert, J. W. Long, K. A. Pettigrew, R. M. Stroud and D. R. Rolison

      Article first published online: 25 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601840

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The impact of nanoarchitecture on the electrical properties of sol–gel-derived Ce0.9Gd0.1O2 (CGO) is evaluated in O2 from 350 to 600 °C. The high degree of interconnectivity established between the < 10 nm crystallites in CGO aerogels (see figure) yields an electroceramic that responds as though it contains no grain boundaries and which exhibits long-range pathways for ionic diffusion (ca. 0.5 mm).

    12. Magnetorheological Fluids Based on Ionic Liquids (pages 1740–1747)

      C. Guerrero-Sanchez, T. Lara-Ceniceros, E. Jimenez-Regalado, M. Raşa and U. S. Schubert

      Article first published online: 25 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700302

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The outstanding properties of ionic liquids are combined with magnetorheological technology to obtain new and “smart” fluids (see figure and cover) that can be applied in diverse areas of research and technology, such as medical therapies (drug delivery and cancer therapeutic methods), engineering devices (dampers and breaks), and accurate transportation and delivery of substances in multiphase biological and chemical systems.

    13. DNA-Templated Semiconductor Nanoparticle Chains and Wires (pages 1748–1751)

      L. Dong, T. Hollis, B. A. Connolly, N. G. Wright, B. R. Horrocks and A. Houlton

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602543

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly organized CdS growth by DNA templating is used to produce either linear arrangements of Q-particles along the DNA strands or continuous conducting nanowires (see figure). By optimizing the reaction conditions, the potential of biopolymers in general and DNA in particular for producing nanometer-scale electronics is exemplified.

    14. Supramolecular Structures Generated by a p-tert-Butylphenyl-amide Derivative of Cholic Acid: From Vesicles to Molecular Tubes (pages 1752–1756)

      V. H. Soto Tellini, A. Jover, F. Meijide, J. Vázquez Tato, L. Galantini and N. V. Pavel

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602581

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The formation of supramolecular structures initiated by a p-tert-butylphenyl-amide derivative of cholic acid is investigated. The initial spherical vesicles, with a rather low effective bending constant, collapse into necklaces that self-transform into tubules of small diameter. Finally, molecular tubes are generated (see figure). During the process, the geometrical constraints of fixed surface area and fixed enclosed volume are obeyed.

    15. Formation of Self-Organized Zirconium Titanate Nanotube Layers by Alloy Anodization (pages 1757–1760)

      K. Yasuda and P. Schmuki

      Article first published online: 25 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601912

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-organized zirconium titanate nanotube layers (see figure) have been produced by anodizing a Ti–Zr alloy in a fluoride-containing electrolyte. The diameter of the tubes can be adjusted by the anodization voltage and ranges from several tens of nanometers to several hundreds of nanometers. The as-formed layers are amorphous but can be crystallized to zirconium titanate by an adequate thermal treatment.

    16. Anisotropic Metal Nanoparticles for Use as Surface-Enhanced Raman Substrates (pages 1761–1765)

      N. R. Jana and T. Pal

      Article first published online: 25 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601749

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silver platelets and silver-coated gold nanorods 20–100 nm in size (with a 10–20 nm short axis; see figure) have been identified as excellent candidates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates. Salt-induced particle aggregation is essential in obtaining high sensitivity.

    17. Highly Stabilized Nucleotide-Capped Small Gold Nanoparticles with Tunable Size (pages 1766–1771)

      W. Zhao, F. Gonzaga, Y. Li and M. A. Brook

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602449

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Improved stability of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in water is achieved by capping the particles. Such stability improvements are significant because of the potential applications of AuNPs in various biologically relevant areas. The highly stabilized water-soluble AuNPs described in this study have precisely tunable sizes ranging from 2 to 5 nm (see figure; inset: fast Fourier transform) and a narrow monodispersity, and are prepared by using nucleotides as capping ligands.

    18. Fabrication of Water-Dispersible Polyaniline-Poly(4-styrenesulfonate) Nanoparticles For Inkjet-Printed Chemical-Sensor Applications (pages 1772–1775)

      J. Jang, J. Ha and J. Cho

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602127

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel fabrication of water-dispersible polyaniline-poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PANI–PSS) nanoparticles with an average diameter of ca. 30 nm is presented. PANI–PSS nanoparticles can be easily processed and thus used in inkjet-printed chemical sensors (an inkjet-printed image is shown in the figure). These chemical sensors shows unprecedented sensitivity and rapid response time compared to the conventional PANI-based chemical sensors.

  7. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Index

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