Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

1989

Volume 1, Issue 5

Pages fmi–fmi, 140–175

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Articles
    6. Panel Discussions
    7. Book Reviews: From Blood Substitutes to Semiconductors and beyond
    8. Short Communication
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010501

  2. Editorial Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Articles
    6. Panel Discussions
    7. Book Reviews: From Blood Substitutes to Semiconductors and beyond
    8. Short Communication
    1. Materials, research—current issues and future directions (pages 140–141)

      Dr. John W. Collette and Dr. Joel S. Miller

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010502

      Technological advances in Europe and the USA which culminated, 50 years ago, in the commercialization of Nylon opened the way for the full scale development of synthetic materials. The Advanced Materials Conference held in Wilmington, Delaware, USA, in October 1988 as part of this 50th anniversary celebration, covered a wide spectrum of issues in materials science. John Collette and Joel Miller, organizers of the conference, introduce a series of reviews based on the lectures which took place.

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Articles
    6. Panel Discussions
    7. Book Reviews: From Blood Substitutes to Semiconductors and beyond
    8. Short Communication
    1. Materials Issues in Electronic Systems (pages 142–145)

      Dr. David W. McCall

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010503

      The manufacture and use of electronic systems involves an enormous amount of materials engineering work. David McCall surveys the various technologies needed to produce electronics components (see figure) and takes a look at possible future developments in this fascinating area.

    2. Materials Processing—a Key Factor (pages 146–151)

      Prof. Walter Michaeli

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010504

      Critical changes in the properties of materials due to varying processing conditions are the driving force behind the attempt to understand and control processing effects. Walter Michaeli uses the processing of polymers to emphasize the factors important in directing the design and processing of materials and the advantages of the integration of computers into development systems.

  4. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Articles
    6. Panel Discussions
    7. Book Reviews: From Blood Substitutes to Semiconductors and beyond
    8. Short Communication
    1. The Keviar Story—an Advanced Materials Case Study (pages 151–156)

      Dr. David Tanner, Dr. James A. Fitzgerald and Dr. Brian R. Phillips

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010505

      The need for a fiber with the heat resistance of asbestos and the stiffness of glass led to the development of Kevlar which has a molecular orientation parallel to the fiber axis (see figure). Brian Phillips et al. trace the many faceted course of the development of Kevlar from the initial scientific discovery to the opening of a 45 million 1b/yr production plant.

    2. Aerospace materials research opportunities (pages 157–164)

      Dr. Michael Salkind

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010506

      Materials used in the aerospace industry must have unique combinations of properties. Michael Salkind reviews the progress made in ceramics, polymers, alloys and composites and emphasizes the multidisciplinary approach which has led to success.

    3. Challenges in Materials for Health Care Applications (pages 164–169)

      Prof. David F. Williams

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010507

      The successful replacement of complex natural tissues (see figure) by synthetic materials is dependent on many factors. Biocompatibility, corrosion and wear, and interfacing are just some of the aspects reviewed by David Williams who also gives a view of future developments in biomaterials.

  5. Panel Discussions

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Articles
    6. Panel Discussions
    7. Book Reviews: From Blood Substitutes to Semiconductors and beyond
    8. Short Communication
    1. Improving effectiveness in materials research (pages 169–171)

      Prof. Gerhard Wegner

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010508

      Panel Discussion: “Educate and cooperate” was the general message which came from the discussion of future trends in materials science during the meeting in Wilmington Delaware. Gerhard Wegner gives a European view of the proceedings, pointing out current trends and future aims in both the teaching of materials science and in the development and production of new materials.

  6. Book Reviews: From Blood Substitutes to Semiconductors and beyond

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Articles
    6. Panel Discussions
    7. Book Reviews: From Blood Substitutes to Semiconductors and beyond
    8. Short Communication
  7. Short Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Articles
    6. Panel Discussions
    7. Book Reviews: From Blood Substitutes to Semiconductors and beyond
    8. Short Communication
    1. Short Communication (page 175)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010513

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