Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

1989

Volume 1, Issue 8-9

Pages fmi–fmi, 249–312

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Book Rivews: Sol-Gel, Drug Release Superconductors and Liquid Crystals
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010801

  2. Editorial Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Book Rivews: Sol-Gel, Drug Release Superconductors and Liquid Crystals
    1. Materials science and engineering in Britain (pages 249–250)

      Prof. Colin Humphreys

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010802

      The funding of the materials science research effort in British universities and polytechnics has recently been reorganized with the founding the Materials Science and' Engineering Commission of the SERC. The chairman of the committee assesses Britain's performance in materials science and outlines the aims and objectives of the funding bodies in the UK. The recent increase in the importance of advanced materials has resulted in a surge research activity but have the funding levels kept pace?

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Book Rivews: Sol-Gel, Drug Release Superconductors and Liquid Crystals
    1. Advanced Catalysts: Interfaces in the physical and biological sciences (pages 251–260)

      Prof. John M. Thomas

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010803

      The presidential address to the chemistry section of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (BAAS) to be given in Sheffield in September by John Thomas (see picture) concentrates on the roles that catalysts play in chemical synthesis both in industry and in a biological environment. The future of catalysts rests in the hands of interdisciplinary scientists and engineers who, when faced with the problem of developing a new catalytic system, can call upon experience from such diverse fields as solid state physics and biology.

    2. Materials for the Next Millenium (pages 260–269)

      Dr. Ernest D. Hondros and Dr. Edward Bullock

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010804

      The future of mankind will be influenced by our attitudes towards the overuse of today's materials and to the development and exploitation of new ones. Current supply and demand trends are analyzed and themes of future significance are examined, which include microstructure control and the design of functional materials.

    3. Tailoring Semiconductor Crystal to atomic dimensions (pages 270–275)

      Prof. Bruce A. Joyce

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010805

      Semiconductor properties resulting from quantum confinement effects can be engineered using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), a method of depositing materials in thin films. The dynamics of thin film growth (see figure) are examined, the production of quantum wells, superlattices and quantum wires is described and recent modifications to the method, based on flux interruption, are reported.

    4. Structure-Directed Synthesis of new organic materials (pages 275–282)

      Dr. Franz H. Kohnke, John P. Mathias and Dr. J. Fraser Stoddart

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010806

      The synthesis of molecular cages, belts and strips opens up new areas of technology for exploitation. Solvent specific sensors are one possible use of cage molecules called carcerands (see figure). A series of Diels Alder reactions under tight stereochemical control are used in a remarkably efficient manner to produce the structures.

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Book Rivews: Sol-Gel, Drug Release Superconductors and Liquid Crystals
    1. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) perspectives and prospects (pages 282–292)

      Prof. John O. Williams

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010807

      Thin film epitaxial semiconductor structures of widely varying but controlled composition and thickness can be prepared using MOCVD. The performance of the method is gauged against molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and spray pyrolysis, and comment is made on the direction in which this area research is going, for example, towards the processing of high-Te superconductors and ferroelectric oxides.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Book Rivews: Sol-Gel, Drug Release Superconductors and Liquid Crystals
    1. Siloxane copolymers with laterally and terminally attached mesogenic side chains (pages 292–294)

      Dr. G. W. Gray, Dr. J. S. Hill and Dr. D. Lacey

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010808

      Liquid crystals based on polysiloxane copolymers (see figure) with well defined physical characteristics have been synthesized by varying the type and ratio of the laterally attached mesogenic side chains. Applications in integrated optics and optical storage are envisaged.

    2. Polymers with a high refractive index and low optical dispersion (pages 294–295)

      Dr. Hans-U. Simmrock, Dr. Alfred Mathy, Dr. Ligia Dominguez, Dr. Wolfgang H. Meyer and Prof. Gerhard Wegner

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010809

      Organic Polyelectrolytes (I-VII) known as Ionenes, with unique combinations of high refractive index (ND) and high Abbe number (VD, see figure) now compete with inorganic glasses for application in optics. Variation of the counterions allows the tuning of their chemical and optical properties.

  6. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Book Rivews: Sol-Gel, Drug Release Superconductors and Liquid Crystals
    1. Gauge theory – a new outlook on solid state dynamics (pages 296–298)

      Prof. Stanley Clough

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010810

      The hitherto mysterious relationship between the quantum and classical descriptions of solid state dynamic processes has been reexamined recently. It has been found that quantum theory has been missing important features such as symmetry breaking and Berry's phase, the incorporation of which does away with the rather fuzzy Copenhagen interpretation and rationalizes solid state behavior.

    2. Imaging organic molecules with the scanning tunneling microscope (pages 299–300)

      Dr. Jürgen P. Rabe

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010811

      The lack of electrical conductivity and the constant molecular mobility of organic molecules have, in the past, restricted the successful imaging of these systems by STM. Recently, however, a number of new organic systems have been imaged. Jürgen Rabe reports on these new developments and in the future will write regularly for ADVANCED MATERIALS on surface analysis techniques especially scanning microscopy methods.

    3. Phase equilibria under stress (pages 300–302)

      Prof. Robert W. Cahn

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010812

      A slight mismatch between the lattice parameters of two intergrown “coherent” phases can cause internal stresses within a two phase alloy which can modify the shapes of the dispersed phase particles. Recent studies by both metallurgists and geologists have been aimed at understanding this and other stress related phenomena.

    4. Networks composed of rigid rod polymers (pages 302–303)

      Dr. Matthias Ballauff

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010813

      Rubber elasticity in macromolecules on which the tire industry (for example) relies is the result of the arrangement of the polymer chains as shown in the figure, crosslinked, and connected by flexible hinges. In two recent publications a theory describing this elasticity has been proposed. Mutthius Bullauff reviews this new work and will, in the future, run a regular column in ADVANCED MATERIALS on polymer related topics.

  7. Conference Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Book Rivews: Sol-Gel, Drug Release Superconductors and Liquid Crystals
    1. Joining ceramics, glass and metal in Bad Nauheim (pages 304–306)

      Graham Partridge

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010814

      G. Partridge (GEC) reports on a meeting which concerned the joining of ceramics, glass, and metals and E. Murinero and T. Suzuki (IBM) on two major symposia from the spring meeting of the MRS, on magnetic and magneto-optic thin films and multilayers.

    2. Magnetic and magneto-optic thin films and multilayers in San Diego (pages 306–308)

      Dr. Ernesto Marinerom and Dr. Takao Suzuki

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010815

  8. Book Rivews: Sol-Gel, Drug Release Superconductors and Liquid Crystals

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Book Rivews: Sol-Gel, Drug Release Superconductors and Liquid Crystals
    1. Sol-gel technology for thin films, fibers, preforms, electronics and specialty shapes. Edited by L. C. Klein. Noyes Publications, New Jersey, USA 1988. xxi, 407 pp., bound, US$72.–1SBN 0-8155-1154-X (page 309)

      Richard Brook

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19890010816

      L. C. Klein (Ed.): Sol-Gel Technology for Thin Films, Fibers, Preforms, Electronics and Speciality Shapes reviewed by R. Brook–M. Rosoff (Ed.): Controlled Release of Drugs: Polymers and Aggregated Systems reviewed by D. W. Grainger – R. M. Hazen: Superconductors: The Breakthrough reviewed by P. Gregory – C. B. McArdle (Ed.): Side Chain Liquid Crystal Polymers reviewed by H.-W. Schmidt.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION