Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 20 Issue 1

January, 2008

Volume 20, Issue 1

Pages 3–210

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Guide for Authors
    6. Communications
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Index
    1. Cover Picture: Fabrication of Elastomeric Wires by Selective Electroless Metallization of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (Adv. Mater. 1/2008)

      M. S. Miller, G. J. E. Davidson, B. J. Sahli, C. M. Mailloux and T. B. Carmichael

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200790106

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple, low-cost method for fabricating flexible copper wires on elastomeric substrates is demonstrated. The use of microcontact printing and electroless metal deposition rather than conventional photolithography and physical vapor deposition of metals makes the process inexpensive and operationally simple. Copper films on elastomers may be used to fabricate flexible electronic circuits and biocompatible electronic devices.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Guide for Authors
    6. Communications
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Index
    1. Inside Front Cover: Superhydrophobic Surfaces Generated from Water-Borne Dispersions of Hierarchically Assembled Nanoparticles Coated with a Reversibly Switchable Shell (Adv. Mater. 1/2008)

      M. Motornov, R. Sheparovych, R. Lupitskyy, E. MacWilliams and S. Minko

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200790107

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The method used to fabricate a superhydrophobic coating from aqueous dispersions of hybrid responsive nanoparticles with no application of surfactants, organic solvents or fluorinated organic materials is reported. The hybrid nanoparticles consisted of a silica core with a grafted mixed block copolymer brush of poly[styrene-block-(4-vinylpyridine)] constituting the responsive particle shell. The responsive shell was used to tune and stabilize the secondary aggregates of the particles of the appropriate size and morphology in an aqueous environment. The suspension of the particles formed a textured superhydrophobic coating on various substrates upon casting, evaporation of water and heating above the glass transition temperature.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Guide for Authors
    6. Communications
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Index
    1. Contents: Adv. Mater. 1/2008 (pages 3–14)

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200790105

  4. Guide for Authors

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Guide for Authors
    6. Communications
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Index
  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Guide for Authors
    6. Communications
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Index
    1. Multilayer Nanocomplexes of Polymer and DNA Exhibit Enhanced Gene Delivery (pages 19–25)

      J. M. Saul, C.-H. K. Wang, C. P. Ng and S. H. Pun

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700633

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymeric-DNA complexes (polyplexes) are constructed with multiple layers of counter-polyions as DNA/polyethylenimine/poly(acrylic acid)/polyethylenimine. The increased association of polyethylenimine achieved by the multilayer approach leads to substantial increases in expression of transgene for reporter plasmids without the need for excess free polymer typically required for non-viral gene delivery. This method of polyplex preparation provides the opportunity to improve transgene expression for gene therapy approaches to disease treatment.

    2. Clusters of Closely Spaced Gold Nanoparticles as a Source of Two-Photon Photoluminescence at Visible Wavelengths (pages 26–30)

      K. Ueno, S. Juodkazis, V. Mizeikis, K. Sasaki and H. Misawa

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602680

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gold nanostructures consisting of nanoblocks separated by a few nanometer-wide gaps were fabricated, and found to exhibit strong photoluminescence due to enhancement of the optical near-field localized in the nanogaps. The fabricated structures demonstrate a nanostructured metallic material capable of efficient photoluminescence, whose efficiency can be adjusted by tailoring the nanogap width.

    3. Molded Nanowell Electrodes for Site-Selective Single Liposome Arrays (pages 31–36)

      P. Kim, B. K. Lee, H. Y. Lee, T. Kawai and K. Y. Suh

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700570

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We present a nanowell (NW)-based biosensing platform for electrochemically detecting biological reactions on the level of single lipid vesicle. The NW geometry of a gently-sloped vertical wall is found to be optimal for selective deposition of single liposomes without capillary resistances. Also, the use of a hydrophilic, non-biofouling PEG copolymer is essential to provide distinctively separated FLV arrays without nonspecific adsorption.

    4. Fmoc-Diphenylalanine Self Assembles to a Hydrogel via a Novel Architecture Based on π–π Interlocked β-Sheets (pages 37–41)

      A. M. Smith, R. J. Williams, C. Tang, P. Coppo, R. F. Collins, M. L. Turner, A. Saiani and R. V. Ulijn

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701221

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The self assembly of peptide hydrogelators that carry aromatic substituents can be modeled by a novel nanocylindrical architecture. The proposed model suggests that the nanocylinders are formed by anti-parallel β-sheets interlocked by the π-stacking interactions of fluorenyl groups and phenyl rings. This explanation is consistent with the structures observed in TEM and the data obtained by a variety of spectroscopic techniques.

    5. Poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) Nanowires with Pronounced β-Phase Morphology: Synthesis, Characterization, and Optical Properties (pages 42–48)

      D. O'Carroll, D. Iacopino, A. O'Riordan, P. Lovera, É. O'Connor, G. A. O'Brien and G. Redmond

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701539

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High aspect ratio, luminescent poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) nanowires are synthesized by template wetting. Optical spectroscopic characterization indicates the formation of a significant fraction of the polymer β-phase. The results indicate that the wires essentially act as self-doped 1D nanostructures in which the PFO β-phase dominates the luminescence behavior following optical, electrochemical or electrical excitation.

    6. Field-Induced Carrier Generation in Conjugated Polymer Semiconductors for Dynamic, Asymmetric Junctions (pages 49–53)

      R. G. Pillai, J. H. Zhao, M. S. Freund and D. J. Thomson

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700854

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A functioning dynamic memory device has been created using a polypyrrole composite material that contains immobilized anions and highly mobile cations in the form of a thin film spanning two metal electrodes in an interdigitated electrode array configuration. Dynamic asymmetric electronic behavior based on the movement of charge in response to the application of a field is demonstrated. The material system described has significant advantages for application in nanometer-scale electronics.

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      Nanorod-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Improved Charge Collection Efficiency (pages 54–58)

      S. H. Kang, S.-H. Choi, M.-S. Kang, J.-Y. Kim, H.-S. Kim, T. Hyeon and Y.-E. Sung

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701819

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) comprising chemically synthesized nanorods and nanoparticles are investigated. In identical circumstances, except for the charge-collection efficiency, nanorod-based DSSCs show improved photovoltaic properties (6.2 % versus 4.3 % for NP-based DSSCs) owing to the characteristics of slightly enhanced electron transport and predominantly degraded charge recombination, compared with nanoparticle-based DSSC.

    8. Fabrication of Elastomeric Wires by Selective Electroless Metallization of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (pages 59–64)

      M. S. Miller, G. J. E. Davidson, B. J. Sahli, C. M. Mailloux and T. B. Carmichael

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702136

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple, low-cost method for fabricating flexible copper wires on elastomeric substrates is demonstrated. The use of microcontact printing and electroless metal deposition rather than conventional photolithography and physical vapor deposition of metals makes the process inexpensive and operationally simple. Copper films on elastomers may be used to fabricate flexible electronic circuits and biocompatible electronic devices.

    9. Highly Efficient Inorganic Transparent UV-Protective Thin-Film Coating by Low Temperature Sol-Gel Procedure for Application on Heat-Sensitive Substrates (pages 65–68)

      H. Cui, M. Zayat, P. G. Parejo and D. Levy

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701960

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transparent inorganic UV-protective coatings are prepared by an epoxide-derived sol-gel route at low temperature. The obtained coatings show high transparency in visible range and highly efficient absorption in the whole UV range, which makes them ideal candidates for the protection against UV radiation.

    10. Highly Efficient Amplified Stimulated Emission from CdSe-CdS-ZnS Quantum Dot Doped Waveguides with Two-Photon Infrared Optical Pumping (pages 69–73)

      J. J. Jasieniak, I. Fortunati, S. Gardin, R. Signorini, R. Bozio, A. Martucci and P. Mulvaney

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701582

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tunable, room-temperature, amplified stimulated emission (ASE) is generated in quantum dot (QD)-doped nanocomposites through two-photon optical pumping in the near infrared (see figure). Utilizing a zirconia host matrix temporal stability comparable to that of ASE generated through optical pumping in the 1-photon excitation region is demonstrated.

    11. Printing of Monolithic Polymeric Microstructures Using Reactive Mesogens (pages 74–78)

      C. Sánchez, F. Verbakel, M. J. Escuti, C. W. M. Bastiaansen and D. J. Broer

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700597

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Printing of well defined micro-structures using a soft lithographic technique based on liquid crystalline inks is presented. Monolithic structures with tunable macromolecular organization can be locally printed with a variety of optical functionalities. Applications in the fields of displays and security- features are shown.

    12. Tunable Emission from Binary Organic One-Dimensional Nanomaterials: An Alternative Approach to White-Light Emission (pages 79–83)

      Y. S. Zhao, H. B. Fu, F. Q. Hu, A. D. Peng, W. S. Yang and J. N. Yao

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700542

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Uniformly doped crystalline organic nanorods and nanowires are prepared by adsorbent-assisted physical vapor deposition. The emission color of the binary 1D nanomaterials can be controlled – and made to approach white light (see figure) – by changing the doping content, which is ascribed to intermolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the two nanocrystalline components.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Tunable Emission from Binary Organic One-Dimensional Nanomaterials: an Alternative Approach to White-Light Emission

      Vol. 20, Issue 7, Version of Record online: 29 APR 2008

    13. Long-Lived Planar Lipid Bilayer Membranes Anchored to an In Situ Polymerized Hydrogel (pages 84–89)

      N. Malmstadt, T.-J. Jeon and J. J. Schmidt

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700810

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bilayer membranes that are covalently conjugated in situ to an encapsulating hydrogel have been formed. These membranes are extremely long-lived, lasting over ten days in standard laboratory conditions, and are sufficiently fluid to support protein incorporation.

    14. A Molecular Mechanism for Toughening and Strengthening Waterborne Nanocomposites (pages 90–94)

      T. Wang, C.-H. Lei, D. Liu, M. Manea, J. M. Asua, C. Creton, A. B. Dalton and J. L. Keddie

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700821

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      A high molecular-weight polymer – not a small molecule or surfactant – is superior for dispersing carbon nanotubes in water when processing a waterborne, polymeric nanocomposite. A polymeric dispersant above its entanglement molecular weight creates a brush structure on the nanotube that increases molecular friction on entangles with the matrix, yielding increased adhesion energy, as shown, along with greater toughness and energy dissipation during deformation. A dispersant can thereby be used to tune a nanocomposite's mechanical properties.

    15. Silicon Colloids: From Microcavities to Photonic Sponges (pages 95–98)

      R. Fenollosa, F. Meseguer and M. Tymczenko

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701589

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silicon colloids with diameters from 0.5 μm to 5 μm are synthesized. Because of their spherical shape and smooth surface they work as optical microcavities with well-defined resonating modes in the near-infrared range. Silicon colloids are also the building blocks of photonic sponges formed by disorder networks of microspheres of different sizes that scatter light strongly in a wide range of wavelengths

    16. Enhancement of In Vitro Capillary Tube Formation by Substrate Nanotopography (pages 99–103)

      C. J. Bettinger, Z. Zhang, S. Gerecht, J. T. Borenstein and R. Langer

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702487

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Endothelial progenitor cells are cultured on nanotopographic substrates with a line-grating geometry and respond to these substrates through aligned and elongated morphology, reduced proliferation, and increased migration relative to flat substrates. The cells also form supercellular band structures, which lead to enhanced capillary tube formation upon the addition of matrigel. These results suggest that substrate nanotopography can be used to create organized vascular structures in vitro. Image taken at 250 × magnification.

    17. Design of Contact-Active Antimicrobial Acrylate-Based Materials Using Biocidal Macromers (pages 104–108)

      C. J. Waschinski, J. Zimmermann, U. Salz, R. Hutzler, G. Sadowski and J. C. Tiller

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701095

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A self organizing antimicrobial finish on acrylate-based materials was achieved by adding only 0.4 wt% of a biocidal macromer to the monomer mixture prior polymerization. The materials surface kills the infectious bacterium Staphylococcus aureus without releasing the biocide (Figure, lower section) and stays active even after 45 d of constant washing. Confocal Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy (Figure, upper section) reveal that the biocide has migrated to the surface of the materials during polymerization.

    18. Spatially Resolved Mapping of Polarization Switching Behavior in Nanoscale Ferroelectrics (pages 109–114)

      B. J. Rodriguez, S. Jesse, M. Alexe and S. V. Kalinin

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700473

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      The spatial variability of polarization switching in ferroelectric lead zirconate-titanate nanoparticle arrays and within a single sub-100 nanometer nanoparticle is investigated by using switching spectroscopy piezoresponse force microscopy. Strong variations of switching properties within a single nanoparticle are observed and attributed to polarization pinning by geometric effects and interfacial dislocations. The spatial distributions of imprint bias and the thickness of the frozen polarization layer within the nanoparticle are reconstructed.

    19. Design of Gallium Nitride Resonant Cavity Light-Emitting Diodes on Si Substrates (pages 115–118)

      M. A. Mastro, J. D. Caldwell, R. T. Holm, R. L. Henry and C. R. Eddy Jr.

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701683

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A GaN resonant cavity light emitting diode was built on a GaN/AlN distributed Bragg reflector grown on a silicon substrate. The electroluminescence output increased by 2.5 times for a GaN diode coupled to a properly designed resonant cavity. Theoretical calculations showed that this enhancement could increase up to four times for transmission through a semi-transparent metal contact design, and up to eight times for a flip-chip design.

    20. Oligo(p-phenylene vinylene)s as a “New” Class of Piezochromic Fluorophores (pages 119–122)

      J. Kunzelman, M. Kinami, B. R. Crenshaw, J. D. Protasiewicz and C. Weder

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701772

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cyano-substituted oligo(p-phenylene vinylene) derivatives can display piezochromic fluorescence. This rare and desirable effect is achieved by balancing π–π and aliphatic interactions in these molecules through the variation of electron density in the central ring and the length of peripheral aliphatic tails. This leads to fluorophores which can adopt different supramolecular structures and as a result can change their solid-state emission characteristics upon compression.

    21. Fabrication and Light-Transmission Properties of Monolayer Square Symmetric Colloidal Crystals via Controlled Convective Self-assembly on 1D Grooves (pages 123–128)

      J. Sun, Y. Y. Li, H. Dong, P. Zhan, C. J. Tang, M. W. Zhu and Z. L. Wang

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701175

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-organization of colloidal spheres within a channel, of which a 1D periodic groove substrate is used as the bottom substrate, is studied. We demonstrate that high-quality monolayer square symmetric colloidal crystals can be achieved only when the colloidal suspension drying front is set parallel to close-packing rows of a commensurate square lattice of the 1D periodic grooves. Experimental optical characterization and theoretical simulations of the samples are presented and discussed.

    22. Advanced Device Architecture for Highly Efficient Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with an Orange-Emitting Crosslinkable Iridium(III) Complex (pages 129–133)

      N. Rehmann, C. Ulbricht, A. Köhnen, P. Zacharias, M. C. Gather, D. Hertel, E. Holder, K. Meerholz and U. S. Schubert

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701699

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Insoluble triplet-emissive layers were realized due to the introduction of an oxetane moiety into an orange-emitting iridium(III)-complex. Highly efficient and entirely solution processed multilayer devices were fabricated and the well-balanced charge injection and transport results in a maximum luminous efficiency of 18.4 cd A–1 and a power efficiency of 14 lm W–1 at a brightness of 100 cd m–2. These results compare favorably with vacuum-processed devices reported in the literature.

    23. Three-Dimensional Geometry of Nanometer-Scale AlN Pits: A New Template for Quantum Dots? (pages 134–137)

      F. Liu, R. Collazo, S. Mita, Z. Sitar and G. Duscher

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701288

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      The exact 3D geometry of nanometer-scale AlN pits is determined by Z-contrast imaging. The figure shows the 3D geometry of an AlN nano-pit and its corresponding GaN quantum dot. An atomic-resolution Z-contrast image is displayed in false color to clearly show the Z-contrast of the image, while the other panel displays a schematic 3D view.

    24. Gold Nanoparticles Induce Oxidative Damage in Lung Fibroblasts In Vitro (pages 138–142)

      J. J. Li, L. Zou, D. Hartono, C.-N. Ong, B.-H. Bay and L.-Y. Lanry Yung

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701853

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      Evaluation of the health risks associated with the use of nanometer-sized particles constitutes an important research field. Here, the effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on human embryonic lung fibroblasts is investigated. The figure shows the uptake of AuNPs by lung fibroblasts. Most nanoparticles are endocytosed and found in vesicles (arrows) around the nucleus (N). However, some particles are found in cytosol (red circle).

    25. Water-in-Oil Microemulsion Preparation and Characterization of Cs2[Mo6X14]@SiO2 Phosphor Nanoparticles Based on Transition Metal Clusters (X = Cl, Br, and I) (pages 143–148)

      F. Grasset, F. Dorson, S. Cordier, Y. Molard, C. Perrin, A.-M. Marie, T. Sasaki, H. Haneda, Y. Bando and M. Mortier

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701686

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      Monodisperse Cs2Mo6X14@SiO2(X = Cl, Br, I) luminescent nanoparticles are synthesized by a water-in-oil microemulsion technique. They emit in the red and near-infrared window (600–900 nm), a region of interest for bio-imaging technologies. Microscopy studies (SEM, TEM and HAADF-STEM, see figure) show a good dispersion of the [Mo6X14]2– anions within the @SiO2 nanoparticles and that the nanoparticles are homogeneous with a regular spherical shape of 45 nm diameter.

    26. A Novel Method of Synthesis of Dense Arrays of Aligned Single Crystalline Copper Nanotubes Using Electrodeposition in the Presence of a Rotating Electric Field (pages 149–154)

      M. Venkata Kamalakar and A. K. Raychaudhuri

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700430

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Copper nanotube arrays are synthesized by electrodeposition of copper into the porous alumina membranes in presence of a lateral rotating electric field. A computer simulation of the experiment gives the insight of growth mechanism. In principle, this method can be applied to synthesize nanotube arrays of all such materials which can be electrodeposited.

    27. Monolithic Actuators from Flash-Welded Polyaniline Nanofibers (pages 155–158)

      C. O. Baker, B. Shedd, P. C. Innis, P. G. Whitten, G. M. Spinks, G. G. Wallace and R. B. Kaner

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602864

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      He'll weld with a mighty hand. Flash-welded polyaniline nanofiber actuators demonstrate unprecedented reversible, rapid actuation upon doping. An intense flash of light creates an asymmetric structure (see figure) with a thin dense layer on top of a thick porous nanofibrillar layer. On exposure to camphor sulfonic acid the asymmetric film curls more than 720°.

    28. Wetting of Silicon Nanograss: From Superhydrophilic to Superhydrophobic Surfaces (pages 159–163)

      C. Dorrer and J. Rühe

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701140

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      The generation of “nanograss” surfaces, where the surface chemistry of nanorough silicon is precisely adjusted by the photochemical immobilization of polymeric thin films, is reported. The wetting properties of the surfaces can range from superwetting to impaled drops and superhydrophobicity. Superhydrophobic nanograss is found to be “condensation resistant”.

    29. Biospecific Recognition of Tethered Small Molecules Diluted in Self-Assembled Monolayers (pages 164–167)

      M. J. Shuster, A. Vaish, M. E. Szapacs, M. E. Anderson, P. S. Weiss and A. M. Andrews

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700082

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      We describe the first in a series of studies designed to develop and to characterize self-assembled monolayers containing isolated small-molecule probes. We insert tether molecules into preformed oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated alkanethiolate monolayer matrices and covalently attach the neurotransmitter serotonin to the tethers. These monolayers selectively recognize serotonin antibodies and resist binding of nonspecific antibodies and proteins. We will use these capture materials for biosensor development and functionally-directed proteomics.

    30. Tunable n-Type Conductivity and Transport Properties of Ga-doped ZnO Nanowire Arrays (pages 168–173)

      G.-D. Yuan, W.-J. Zhang, J.-S. Jie, X. Fan, J.-X. Tang, I. Shafiq, Z.-Z. Ye, C.-S. Lee and S.-T. Lee

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701377

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      Well-aligned ZnO nanowires (NWs) with tunable n-type conductivity are synthesized by introducing Ga2O3 as a dopant source in thermal evaporation. The crystallographic orientation of the NWs depends on the dopant content. Electrical transport property measurements on single nanowires verify that the resistivity of ZnO NWs can be controlled, with high reproducibility, by the Ga impurities.

    31. Polymerizable Photochromic Macrocyclic Metallomesogens: Design of Supramolecular Polymers with Responsive Nanopores (pages 174–178)

      C. S. Pecinovsky, E. S. Hatakeyama and D. L. Gin

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702210

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      A liquid-crystalline (LC) monomer containing a bis(azobenzene)-based metallomacrocycle was synthesized and found to form a columnar hexagonal (ColH) LC phase. Adding solvent to swell the cross-linked ColH phase allows the azobenzene macrocycles to undergo photo-isomerization from the “closed” to “open” form with retention of LC order to afford a supramolecular polymer with photo-responsive nanopores.

    32. Rational Synthesis of Helically Coiled Carbon Nanowires and Nanotubes through the Use of Tin and Indium Catalysts (pages 179–182)

      W. Wang, K. Yang, J. Gaillard, P. R. Bandaru and A. M. Rao

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701143

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      The synthesis of helically coiled nanotubes and nanowires through the use of In and Sn catalysts, respectively, in a floating-catalyst-based CVD process, is demonstrated. The figure is a scanning electron microscopy image of helically coiled carbon nanowires prepared from a thermal decomposition of xylene and acetylene in the presence of Fe–Sn catalyst particles. The bright spot at the tip of each nanowire represents the catalyst particle.

    33. Morphology of Microtubules Grown in Agarose Gels: Effect of Diffusion and Confinement (pages 183–188)

      J. S. Castro, P. A. Deymier, S. D. Smith and J. B. Hoying

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700608

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      The controlled assembly of active microtubule (MT)-based networks offers great promise in numerous technologies. The design and construction of these systems requires MT growth in 3D scaffolds such as gels. We report on the morphology of MTs grown in a crowded environment in the form of viscous fluids containing agarose, and in confined environments in the case of solid agarose gels. The experimental results are supported by a computational model.

    34. The Inner Shell Influence on the Electronic Structure of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (pages 189–194)

      Y. Tison, C. E. Giusca, V. Stolojan, Y. Hayashi and S. R. P. Silva

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700399

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      We present STM and STS results obtained for double-walled carbon nanotubes. In the case displayed here, the STS results exhibit the Van Hove singularities corresponding to semi conducting tubes for both the outer and the inner shell and a finite density of states at the Fermi level (EF) is observed for a DWNT. We associate this behavior to the presence of an intershell interaction.

    35. Nano-embossed Hollow Spherical TiO2 as Bifunctional Material for High-Efficiency Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 195–199)

      H.-J. Koo, Y. J. Kim, Y. H. Lee, W. I. Lee, K. Kim and N.-G. Park

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700840

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      Nano-embossed hollow spherical (NeHS) TiO2 that features both good light scattering and charge generation shows a very promising performance in high-efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells. A bilayered film structure having the bifunctional NeHS TiO2 particulate film as an overlayer exhibits conversion efficiencies as high as 10.34 % under AM-1.5G one sun light intensity.

    36. Superhydrophobic Surfaces Generated from Water-Borne Dispersions of Hierarchically Assembled Nanoparticles Coated with a Reversibly Switchable Shell (pages 200–205)

      M. Motornov, R. Sheparovych, R. Lupitskyy, E. MacWilliams and S. Minko

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700030

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The method used to fabricate a superhydrophobic coating from aqueous dispersions of hybrid responsive nanoparticles with no application of surfactants, organic solvents or fluorinated organic materials is reported. The hybrid nanoparticles consisted of a silica core with a grafted mixed block copolymer brush of poly[styrene-block-(4-vinylpyridine)] constituting the responsive particle shell. The responsive shell was used to tune and stabilize the secondary aggregates of the particles of the appropriate size and morphology in an aqueous environment. The suspension of the particles formed a textured superhydrophobic coating on various substrates upon casting, evaporation of water and heating above the glass transition temperature.

  6. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Guide for Authors
    6. Communications
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Index
  7. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Guide for Authors
    6. Communications
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Index

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