Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 20 Issue 10

May 19, 2008

Volume 20, Issue 10

Pages 1805–2014

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Index
    1. Cover Picture: Embedding Organic Light-Emitting Diodes into Channel Waveguide Structures (Adv. Mater. 10/2008) (page 1805)

      Malte C. Gather, Fabian Ventsch and Klaus Meerholz

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890037

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cost-efficient production of optical lab-on-a-chip sensors requires the integration of a light source and a wave-guiding element onto a single chip. In their Communication on p. 1966, Klaus Meerholz and co-workers demonstrate that the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) technology favourably lends itself to this task. The cover shows a device with eleven parallel waveguides of different length, each of which has an OLED integrated into its core (Picture by A. Reckmann).

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Index
    1. Inside Front Cover: Differential Conductivity in Self-Assembled Nanodomains of a Diblock Copolymer Using Polystyrene-block-Poly(ferrocenylethylmethylsilane) (Adv. Mater. 10/2008) (page 1806)

      James K. Li, Shan Zou, David A. Rider, Ian Manners and Gilbert C. Walker

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890038

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The differential conductivity of the domains of a phase-segregated diblock copolymer film, polystyrene-block-poly ferrocenylethylmethylsilane (PS-b-PFEMS), is investigated using conducting-probe atomic force microscopy as reported by Gilbert Walker and co-workers on p. 1989. Analysis of PFEMS regions show asymmetric I-V behavior, and concomitant width increase with bias indicates filling of trap states. Here, the topography is shown to correlate with the current image when scanning with an applied voltage bias.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Index
  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Index
    1. Platinum Catalyst Nanoparticles from Directed Deposition in Functional Block Copolymers (pages 1819–1824)

      Sundar Mayavan, Namita Roy Choudhury and Naba Kumar Dutta

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702069

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      An insight into the utilization of solvent driven morphology of functional block copolymers as nanoreactors for forming and stabilizing catalytic nanoparticles is presented. Highly dispersed nanoparticles would have great impact on the catalyst utilization if integrated within proton conducting network, which is hard to realize with existing approaches.

    2. Protein In-Mold Patterning (pages 1825–1829)

      Susan B. N. Biancardo, Henrik J. Pranov and Niels B. Larsen

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702859

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      Nano-and microscopic patterns of active proteins may be built into the surface of polymers during injection molding of hot polymer melts. The retained biofunction is likely due to extremely fast (nanoseconds) cooling rates within nanometers of the cold mold/hot melt interface.

    3. Identification of a Highly Specific Hydroxyapatite-binding Peptide using Phage Display (pages 1830–1836)

      Marc D. Roy, Scott K. Stanley, Eric J. Amis and Matthew L. Becker

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702322

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      A peptide sequence SVSVGMKPSPRP that selectively recognizes hydroxyapatite (HA) is identified by using a phage display approach. The engineered sequence exhibits chemical and structural specificity for HA over calcium carbonate and HA's amorphous calcium phosphate precursor. In situ binding to HA in a tooth cross section further demonstrates the sequence specificity and utility in nondestructive imaging applications.

    4. Synthesis and Characterization of Organic–Inorganic Hybrid GeOx/Ethylenediamine Nanowires (pages 1837–1842)

      Qingsheng Gao, Ping Chen, Yahong Zhang and Yi Tang

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701646

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      Organic-inorganic hybrid GeOx/ethylenediamine (EDA) nanowires are fabricated via a Fe2O3-assisted hydrothermal method. EDA connects the inorganic units through (N-H•••O-Ge) H-bonding to form a sub-nanometer periodic structure in the nanowires. This structure exhibits an obvious quantum confinement effect and thereby a blue-shift in the UV/vis spectrum. A Fe2O3-assisted growth mechanism is proposed, in which (N-H•••O-Ge) H-bonding induces anisotropic growth of the nanowires.

    5. Integrated Catalytic Activity of Patterned Multilayer Films Based on pH-Induced Electrostatic Properties of Enzymes (pages 1843–1848)

      Jeongju Park, Inpyo Kim, Hyunjung Shin, Min Jung Lee, Youn Sang Kim, Joona Bang, Frank Caruso and Jinhan Cho

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702407

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Patterned multilayer structures are fabricated on enzymatic surfaces using pH-induced variations in the electrostatic properties of these surfaces, as schematically illustrated in the figure. Notably, this process does not require photolithography or the use of hydrophobic components that could lead to a loss of enzymatic activity. Highly effective electrochemical sensors incorporating metal nanoparticles and biocatalysts are fabricated using this approach.

    6. Transparent Nanocomposites Based on Cellulose Produced by Bacteria Offer Potential Innovation in the Electronics Device Industry (pages 1849–1852)

      Masaya Nogi and Hiroyuki Yano

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702559

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bacterial cellulose (BC) pellicles consist of a layered structure of planar nanofiber networks, which enables the production of optically transparent composites with an ultralow coefficient of thermal expansion comparable to that of silicon crystal. The BC nanofiber networks suppress crack propagation in the brittle matrix resin, resulting in composites that can be bent without damage (see figure).

    7. A General Route to Nonspherical Anatase TiO2 Hollow Colloids and Magnetic Multifunctional Particles (pages 1853–1858)

      Xiong Wen Lou and Lynden A. Archer

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702379

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      A general scheme for the preparation of non-spherical anatase TiO2 hollow particles and derived magnetic multifunctional particles by converting hematite cores to magnetite phase is reported (see figure). The TiO2 hollow particles manifest excellent cycling performance and rate capability, confirming their promising application as anode materials for high power lithium batteries.

    8. Copper Nanowires with a Five-Twinned Structure Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition (pages 1859–1863)

      Changwook Kim, Wenhua Gu, Martha Briceno, Ian M. Robertson, Hyungsoo Choi and Kyekyoon (Kevin) Kim

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701460

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Freestanding copper nanowires (CuNWs) grown by CVD are analyzed by electron microscopy to show the details of a fivefold-twinned structure. The electron diffraction pattern discloses irregular mismatching of the twin boundaries. The electron emission characteristics of the CuNWs are presented, along with a CuNW-based proof-of-principle field-emission display (see figure).

    9. Fabrication of Mesoporous Functionalized Arrays by Integrating Deep X-Ray Lithography with Dip-Pen Writing (pages 1864–1869)

      Paolo Falcaro, Stefano Costacurta, Luca Malfatti, Masahide Takahashi, Tongjit Kidchob, Maria Francesca Casula, Massimo Piccinini, Augusto Marcelli, Benedetta Marmiroli, Heinz Amenitsch, Piero Schiavuta and Plinio Innocenzi

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702795

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Deep X-ray lithography (DXRL) allows the highly controlled patterning of mesoporous films (see figure). This technique requires no resist, enabling direct patterning without causing mesostructure degradation. Increase of silica polycondensation and partial removal of the templating agent is induced by synchrotron radiation. Selective functionalization of the mesoporous objects is achieved by combining DXRL with dip-pen writing.

    10. Modulation of Third-Order Nonlinear Optical Properties by Backbone Modification of Polymeric Pillared-Layer Heterometallic Clusters (pages 1870–1875)

      Chi Zhang, Yuan Cao, Jinfang Zhang, Suci Meng, Tsuyoshi Matsumoto, Yinglin Song, Jing Ma, Zhaoxu Chen, Kazuyuki Tatsumi and Mark G. Humphrey

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702645

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three polymeric heterothiometallic clusters with 3D pillar-layer-alternating honeycomblike frameworks are synthesized by a one-pot self-assembly reaction. Z-scan experiments demonstrate that the nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior of these clusters can be modulated by modifying the conjugated chain of the connecting backbone ligands (see figure). Time-dependent density functional theory calculations support and rationalize the observed NLO modulation.

    11. Towards Solutions of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Common Solvents (pages 1876–1881)

      Shane D. Bergin, Valeria Nicolosi, Philip V. Streich, Silvia Giordani, Zhenyu Sun, Alan H. Windle, Peter Ryan, N. Peter P. Niraj, Zhi-Tao T. Wang, Leslie Carpenter, Werner J. Blau, John J. Boland, James P. Hamilton and Jonathan N. Coleman

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702451

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spontaneous exfoliation of single-walled carbon nanotubes on dilution of dispersions in a common solvent, N-methyl-pyrrolidone, is demonstrated. The free-energy of mixing is negative, confirming athermal solubility. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements show physisorption of the solvent to the nanotube (see figure). Experiments, supported by a simple model, show that successful solvents for nanotubes are those with surface tensions close to that of graphite.

    12. Controlled β-Phase Formation in Poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorene) by Processing with Alkyl Additives (pages 1882–1885)

      Jeffrey Peet, Erin Brocker, Yunhua Xu and Guillermo C. Bazan

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702515

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      By introducing 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) into solutions used to spin cast poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorene) films, the β-phase content can be tailored between 0 and 45%. The absorption of films cast from o-xylene containing between 0 and 16% DIO by volume is shown at left. In turn, this morphological change can lead to a ca. 50% increase in the efficiency of polymer light emitting diodes.

    13. Hybrid Light-Emitting Diodes from Microcontact-Printing Double-Transfer of Colloidal Semiconductor CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots onto Organic Layers (pages 1886–1891)

      Aurora Rizzo, Marco Mazzeo, Marco Palumbo, Gianluca Lerario, Stefania D'Amone, Roberto Cingolani and Giuseppe Gigli

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701480

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel dry deposition approach is developed to transfer arrays of colloidal quantum dots onto organic thin films, as illustrated in the figure. A red light-emitting device combining inorganic and organic components is fabricated based on this simple transfer protocol.

    14. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Thermoelectric Transport Properties of Impurity-Free Antimony Telluride Hexagonal Nanoplates (pages 1892–1897)

      Weidong Shi, Liang Zhou, Shuyan Song, Jianhui Yang and Hongjie Zhang

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702003

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Impurity-free single-crystalline antimony telluride hexagonal nanoplates (see figure) are synthesized by a facile and quick hydrothermal treatment without any organic additives or templates. The inherent crystal structure is the driving force for the growth of these Sb2Te3 hexagonal nanoplates. Films of these nanoplates shows p-type behavior, and exhibit a promisingly high Seebeck coefficient of 125 µV K−1 at room temperature.

    15. Universal Block Copolymer Lithography for Metals, Semiconductors, Ceramics, and Polymers (pages 1898–1904)

      Seong-Jun Jeong, Guodong Xia, Bong Hoon Kim, Dong Ok Shin, Se-Hun Kwon, Sang-Won Kang and Sang Ouk Kim

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702930

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A universal block copolymer lithography is developed for a broad spectrum of materials including metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and polymers by combining advanced film deposition techniques with block copolymer lithography. The figure presents a nanopatterned platinum film prepared by applying universal block copolymer lithography.

    16. Electron Tomography Imaging and Analysis of γ′ and γ Domains in Ni-based Superalloys (pages 1905–1909)

      Satoshi Hata, Kosuke Kimura, Hongye Gao, Syo Matsumura, Minoru Doi, Tomokazu Moritani, Jonathan S. Barnard, Jenna R. Tong, Jo H. Sharp and Paul A. Midgley

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702461

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      Advanced electron tomography enables the visualization of 3D domain structures in crystalline materials (see figure) In this study, the morphology and composition ofγ′(L12-ordered) and γ (A1-disordered) domains formed in Ni-based Ni[BOND]Al[BOND]Ti superalloys are investigated by tomographic dark-field and energy-filtered transmission electronmicroscopy.

    17. Pyrenecyclodextrin-Decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors as Chemical Sensors (pages 1910–1915)

      Yan-Li Zhao, Liangbing Hu, J. Fraser Stoddart and George Grüner

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702804

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      Sensing Device: A pyrenecyclodextrin-decorated single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistor acts as a chemical sensor to detect organic molecules selectively in aqueous solution, based on their molecular recognition with β-cyclodextrin.

    18. Microporous Organic Polymers for Methane Storage (pages 1916–1921)

      Colin D. Wood, Bien Tan, Abbie Trewin, Fabing Su, Matthew J. Rosseinsky, Darren Bradshaw, Yan Sun, Li Zhou and Andrew I. Cooper

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702397

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      Methane storage is important for the development of alternative energy carriers. The synthesis and methane storage properties of microporous hypercrosslinked organic polymers are reported. The figure shows a simulation of methane sorption in microporous hypercrosslinked poly(p-dichloroxylene); up to 5.2 mmol g−1 CH4 at 20 bar/298 K; isosteric heat of sorption ∼21 kJ mol−1.

    19. Biodegradable Xylitol-Based Polymers (pages 1922–1927)

      Joost P. Bruggeman, Christopher J. Bettinger, Christiaan L.E. Nijst, Daniel S. Kohane and Robert Langer

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702377

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      Synthetic polymers composed of metabolites endogenous to the mammalian organism are designed. The design is based on the monomer xylitol, which possesses a wide range of physical properties that are biologically relevant. Xylitol-based hydrogels and elastomers are biocompatible in vitro and in vivo, compared to the prevalent synthetic polymer poly(L-lactic-co- glycolic acid) (PLGA). It furthermore provides a platform to tune mechanical properties, degradation profiles, and cell attachment.

    20. Stable Bimetallic Gold–Platinum Nanoparticles Immobilized on Spherical Polyelectrolyte Brushes: Synthesis, Characterization, and Application for the Oxidation of Alcohols (pages 1928–1933)

      Marc Schrinner, Sebastian Proch, Yu Mei, Rhett Kempe, Nobuyoshi Miyajima and Matthias Ballauff

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702421

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      Homogeneous alloy nanoparticles as excellent catalysts. Spherical polyelectrolyte brushes can be used to generate Au-Pt alloy nanoparticles (see figure) that exhibit properties widely differing from the properties of the respective bulk alloys. The alloy nanoparticles are shown to be homogeneous solid solutions. Moreover, they are effective catalysts for the selective oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes and ketones.

    21. Self-Sealing of Nanoporous Low Dielectric Constant Patterns Fabricated by Nanoimprint Lithography (pages 1934–1939)

      Hyun Wook Ro, Huagen Peng, Ken-ichi Niihara, Hae-Jeong Lee, Eric K. Lin, Alamgir Karim, David W. Gidley, Hiroshi Jinnai, Do Y. Yoon and Christopher L. Soles

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701994

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cross-sectional TEM image shows that line-space patterns can be directly imprinted, with high fidelity, into highly porous spin-on organosilicate materials. This publication quantifies how the porosity and distribution of pores within the patterns are affected by the nanoimprint lithography processes, including evidence for a densified pattern surface.

    22. Two-Photon Absorption and Lasing in First-Generation Bisfluorene Dendrimers (pages 1940–1944)

      Georgios Tsiminis, Jean-Charles Ribierre, Arvydas Ruseckas, Homar S. Barcena, Garry J. Richards, Graham A. Turnbull, Paul L. Burn and Ifor D. W. Samuel

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702498

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      The two-photon absorption properties of bisfluorene dendrimers are investigated in both the nanosecond and the femtosecond regime. By substituting different dendrons onto the same chromophore (see figure), we examine the effect of the dendrons on the spectrum and magnitude of the two-photon absorption. As these dendrimers have high photoluminescence quantum yields, we then proceed to make two-photon pumped dendrimer lasers.

    23. Multiwalled HgX (X = S, Se, Te) Nanotubes Formed with a Mercury Iodide Catalyst in Nanocrystalline Thin Films Spray-Deposited at Low Temperature (pages 1945–1951)

      Arnepalli Ranga Rao, Viresh Dutta and Vidyanand N. Singh

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702852

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      X (HgX = S, Se,Te) nanotube formation by low-temperature spray deposition of solvothermally synthesized HgX nanoparticles is demonstrated. HgI2 is found to act as a catalyst for HgX nanotube growth; the mechanism being similar to that of the catalytic tip growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. The figure shows the obtained bamboo-shaped HgS nanotubes with hexagonal crystal structure and HgSe and HgTe nanotubes with cubic crystal structure (from left to right).

    24. Silicon Surface-Bound Redox-Active Conjugated Wires Derived From Mono- and Dinuclear Iron(II) and Ruthenium(II) Oligo(phenyleneethynylene) Complexes (pages 1952–1956)

      Nicolas Gauthier, Gilles Argouarch, Frédéric Paul, Mark G. Humphrey, Loic Toupet, Soraya Ababou-Girard, Hussein Sabbah, Philippe Hapiot and Bruno Fabre

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800324

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      Electron-rich mononuclear Fe(II) or dinuclear Fe(II)/Ru(II) acetylide complexes are photochemically grafted onto hydrogenated silicon surfaces following a simple and mild one-step procedure. The monolayers of redox-active organometallics that are formed exhibit efficient electrical communication between their bound metallic centers and the silicon surface through interfacial Si[BOND]C bonds.

    25. Efficient, Color Stable White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Based on High Energy Level Yellowish-Green Dopants (pages 1957–1961)

      Young-Seo Park, Jae-Wook Kang, Dong Min Kang, Jong-Won Park, Yoon-Hi Kim, Soon-Ki Kwon and Jang-Joo Kim

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702435

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      White OLEDs with high efficiency and high color stability are developed by using high energy level dopants. The white OLEDs showed high external quantum efficiency of 11.7% and remarkable color stability with the variation of CIE chromaticity coordinates less than (0.02, 0.01) between 10 cd m−2 and 5000 cd m−2. Moreover roll-off of efficiency was low and the CRI value was over 87.

    26. Nanopatterned Self-Assembled Monolayers by Using Diblock Copolymer Micelles as Nanometer-Scale Adsorption and Etch Masks (pages 1962–1965)

      Sivashankar Krishnamoorthy, Raphael Pugin, Juergen Brugger, Harry Heinzelmann and Christian Hinderling

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702005

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      Nanopatterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are obtained from a simple, straight-forward procedure by using masks derived from monolayers of block copolymer micelles. The nanopatterned SAMs consist of regularly spaced circular hydrophilic areas with diameters of approximately 60 nm on a continous hydrobhopic background or vice versa. The surfaces are shown to be excellent tools for the preparation of arrays of nanocrystals.

    27. Embedding Organic Light-Emitting Diodes into Channel Waveguide Structures (pages 1966–1971)

      Malte C. Gather, Fabian Ventsch and Klaus Meerholz

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702837

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      Combining optical waveguides and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is a key requirement for optical sensors based on organic materials. A device architecture in which the active layers of the OLED also form the waveguide structure is demonstrated (see figure), and it is shown that the choice of materials with adequate optical an electrical properties is crucial to obtain low-loss waveguides.

    28. Self-Assembled Monolayers of a Malachite Green Derivative: Surfaces with pH- and UV-Responsive Wetting Properties (pages 1972–1977)

      Yugui Jiang, Pengbo Wan, Mario Smet, Zhiqiang Wang and Xi Zhang

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702366

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      Surfaces that respond to pH and UV stimuli are fabricated from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of a malachite green derivative on a rough surface (see figure). The wetting properties of the SAMs exhibit an uncommon response to pH and UV illumination, and range from superhydrophobicity to superhydrophilicity.

    29. Patterning of Polymers on a Substrate via Ink-Jet Printing of a Coordination Polymerization Catalyst (pages 1978–1981)

      Johannes Huber, Abderramane Amgoune and Stefan Mecking

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702702

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      Laterally structured polymer patterns are prepared by ink-jet printing of a coordination polymerization catalyst. This enables the direct preparation of patterns of polyacetylene, as an example of an insoluble, intractable and, thus, difficult-to-process polymer. Circuit paths are prepared on flexible substrates, exemplified by a functioning 4 × 4 calculator keypad.

    30. Design of Hole Blocking Layer with Electron Transport Channels for High Performance Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 1982–1988)

      Chung-Chin Hsiao, An-En Hsiao and Show-An Chen

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702150

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      A novel dual-functional composite layer composed of a high ionization potential nonconjugated polymer or conjugated molecular material and an inorganic salt of a low work function metal is demonstrated. The composite provides superior hole blocking along with promising electron transport capability and results in good device performance for two model electroluminescent polymers, PFO and MEH-PPV.

    31. Differential Conductivity in Self-Assembled Nanodomains of a Diblock Copolymer Using Polystyrene-block-Poly(ferrocenylethylmethylsilane) (pages 1989–1993)

      James K. Li, Shan Zou, David A. Rider, Ian Manners and Gilbert C. Walker

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702796

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The differential conductivity of the domains of a phase segregated diblock copolymer film, polystyrene-block-poly (ferrocenylethylmethylsilane) (PS-b-PFEMS), is described using conducting-probe atomic force microscopy. The schematic on the right depicts the experimental setup, and the image on the left is a representative current map of a 1 µm2 PS-b-PFEMS thin film on gold substrate, under an applied voltage bias of −9 V.

    32. Stacking of Organic Thin Film Transistors: Vertical Integration (pages 1994–1997)

      Soon-Min Seo, Changhoon Baek and Hong H. Lee

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701770

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      Three-dimensional integration in the vertical direction is attractive for organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) and circuits based on OTFTs simply because the device fabrication involves forming layers in the vertical direction. For the vertical stacking of the devices, however, any device in the stacked configuration has to be isolated from the ones above and below the device. We developed approaches that can resolve the problems for the vertical stacking of organic thin film transistors.

    33. Reversible and Amplified Fluorescence Quenching of a Photochromic Polythiophene (pages 1998–2002)

      Jeremy Finden, Tamara K. Kunz, Neil R. Branda and Michael O. Wolf

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702455

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      Amplification of fluorescence quenching of a polythiophene is optically triggered by converting pendant dithienylethene (DTE) photoswitches to their ring- closed isomers using UV light. The effect can be reversed with visible light, which regenerates the original DTE isomer. Amplification attributed to the high mobility of electronic excited states in conjugated polymers, which facilitates energy transfer to a ring-closed DTE.

    34. Iridium Complexes with Cyclometalated 2-Cycloalkenyl-Pyridine Ligands as Highly Efficient Emitters for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 2003–2007)

      Dong Min Kang, Jae-Wook Kang, Jong Won Park, Sung Ouk Jung, Se-Hyung Lee, Hyung-Dol Park, Yun-Hi Kim, Sung Chul Shin, Jang-Joo Kim and Soon-Ki Kwon

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702558

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      Iridium complexes containing cyclometalated 2-cyclohexenylpyridine derivatives with rigid and bulky cyclohexene units are synthesized, and found to be highly efficient materials in EL devices (see figure). Devices based on these iridium complexes emit yellowish- green light with the very high external quantum efficiency of 18.7%.

    35. Intact Pattern Transfer of Conductive Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelet Composite Films to Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Platforms (pages 2008–2012)

      Troy R. Hendricks, Jue Lu, Lawrence T. Drzal and Ilsoon Lee

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702672

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      A simple method for creating patterned conductive multilayered polymer/exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) nanocomposite films is presented, by using the LBL assembly of xGnP and the intact pattern transfer of these films to a substrate. After four bilayers are deposited onto the stamp, conductive patterns can be created on virtually any substrate.

  5. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Index

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