Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 20 Issue 12

June 18, 2008

Volume 20, Issue 12

Pages 2239–2452

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Corrections
    9. Index
    1. Cover Picture: Controlling the Assembly of Silver Nanocubes through Selective Functionalization of Their Faces (Adv. Mater. 12/2008)

      Matthew Rycenga, Joseph M. McLellan and Younan Xia

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890045

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      The cover shows some of the assemblies that can be generated from the self-assembly of silver nanocubes. These nanocubes have faces that have been selectively functionalized with alkanethiols in patterns that allow for their controlled assembly, as reported by Younan Xia and co-workers on p. 2416. Self-assembly occurs in water from the collective hydrophobic interactions of the functionalized nanocubes.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Corrections
    9. Index
    1. Inside Front Cover: Colloidal Crystal Wires (Adv. Mater. 12/2008)

      Michael Tymczenko, Lluis F. Marsal, Trifon Trifonov, Isabelle Rodriguez, Fernando Ramiro-Manzano, Josep Pallares, Angel Rodriguez, Ramon Alcubilla and Francisco Meseguer

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890046

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      The inside cover shows strands of colloidal crystal wires made from latex spheres. The processing method, reported by Francisco Meseguer and co-workers on p. 2315, concerns the infiltration of particles into microporous silicon with channels that are a few times larger than latex particles. The important parameter is the ratio between the pore diameter and the particle size: the confinement ratio D. In the reported experiments, D varies between 1 and 3.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Corrections
    9. Index
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 12/2008) (pages 2239–2250)

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890047

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Corrections
    9. Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Developments in Nanostructured Cathode Materials for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 2251–2269)

      Ying Wang and Guozhong Cao

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702242

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      This Review describes some recent developments in the synthesis and characterizations of nanostructured cathode materials for Li-ion rechargeable batteries with high energy density, high rate capability and excellent cycling stability. The nanostructured cathode materials provide high surface area, short distance for mass and charge transport, and freedom for volume change.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Corrections
    9. Index
    1. Reversible Infrared Actuation of Carbon Nanotube–Liquid Crystalline Elastomer Nanocomposites (pages 2271–2275)

      Liqiang Yang, Kristina Setyowati, An Li, Shaoqin Gong and Jian Chen

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702953

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      Nanocomposite films comprising polymer-functionalized single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWNTs) and liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) show a reversible IR-induced strain (∼−30%) at very low SWNT loading levels (≤0.2 wt%). SWNTs can efficiently transform absorbed IR light into thermal energy, thereby serving as a nanoscale heat-source and thermal- conduction pathway. The absorbed thermal-energy induced a nematic– isotropic phase-transition, generating a shape change in the nanocomposite film.

    2. Perpendicular Branching in Crystal Growth of 3D Architecture-Tuned Cadmium Hydroxide Arrays: From Oriented Tripods to Faceted Crystals (pages 2276–2279)

      Haidong Yu, Deshen Wang and Ming Yong Han

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702844

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      A chemical liquid-phase deposition method is used to synthesize perpendicularly branched nanotripods on substrates through continuous replenishment of nutrients into solution. A good control in crystal growth from oriented tripods to faceted crystals has been achieved, and more complex nanostructures are expected to be prepared by this slow crystal growth process.

    3. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Schiff-Base-Containing Conductive Polymer Films Electro-deposited in Microgravity (pages 2280–2284)

      Agostino Pietrangelo, Bryan C. Sih, Britta N. Boden, Zhenwei Wang, Qifeng Li, Keng C. Chou, Mark J. MacLachlan and Michael O. Wolf

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702582

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      Organic–inorganic hybrid films prepared from copper(II)-containing Schiff base complexes bearing long alkoxy chains grown under microgravity conditions show enhanced third-order NLO susceptibilities relative to films grown at 1 g.

    4. Human Embryoid Bodies Containing Nano- and Microparticulate Delivery Vehicles (pages 2285–2291)

      Lino Ferreira, Trevor Squier, Hyoungshin Park, Hannah Choe, Daniel S. Kohane and Robert Langer

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702404

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      Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells is affected by the incorporation of growth-factor-releasing particles in embryoid bodies. Incorporation of these particles has a minimal effect on cell viability and proliferation but a large impact on differentiation. The figure shows the distribution of TRITC-labeled microparticles in embryoid bodies, as evaluated by confocal microscopy.

    5. Monodisperse Chitosan Microspheres with Interesting Structures for Protein Drug Delivery (pages 2292–2296)

      Wei Wei, Lan Yuan, Gang Hu, Lian-Yan Wang, Jie Wu, Xue Hu, Zhi-Guo Su and Guang-Hui Ma

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702663

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      Monodisperse chitosan microspheres with different structures are prepared and loaded with proteins, as exemplified in the figure. The different types of microspheres show different protein release profiles, which implies that that their properties can be adjusted to fit the needs of different therapeutic applications. The structural properties of the microspheres are varied by adjusting the surface charge, cavity size, and wall porosity.

    6. Synthesis of Quasi-Hexagonal Ordered Arrays of Metallic Nanoparticles with Tuneable Particle Size (pages 2297–2302)

      Theobald Lohmueller, Eva Bock and Joachim P. Spatz

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702635

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      Quasi-hexagonal ordered arrays of noble-metal nanoparticles are synthesized by block copolymer micelle nanolithography (BCML) and electroless deposition. Two approaches are discussed to uniformly grow surface-deposited gold, platinum, and palladium nanoparticles independent of interparticle spacing (see figure). The geometrical order of the particles is preserved by either embedding them into a monolayer of alkylsiloxane molecules or using micelles as a stabilizing template.

    7. Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers for Lithography-Free Nanopatterning (pages 2303–2307)

      Bong Hoon Kim, Dong Ok Shin, Seong-Jun Jeong, Chong Min Koo, Sang Chul Jeon, Wook Jung Hwang, Sumi Lee, Moon Gyu Lee and Sang Ouk Kim

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702285

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      Hierarchical self-assembly of block copolymers has been achieved by two steps of sequential ordering processes, consisting of self-organized micropatterning from a dewetting block polymer solution and thermal annealing. The self-organized micropattern induces the spontaneous alignment of self-assembled lamellae (see figure), which is successfully applied for a lithography-free, ultra-large-scale nanopatterning.

    8. Millimeter-Scale Assembly of CdSe Nanorods into Smectic Superstructures by Solvent Drying Kinetics (pages 2308–2314)

      Claudia Querner, Michael D. Fischbein, Paul A. Heiney and Marija Drndić

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800125

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      Solid-state CdSe nanorod (NR) smectic superstructures (see figure) on a millimeter scale are achieved by exploiting capillary flow kinetics of a drying droplet. NRs assemble side-to-side into micrometer-long “tracks”, acting as individual building blocks that assemble by capillary forces into smectic superstructures. The size of the superstructures and the short drying time makes the capillary-flow mechanism of ordered self-assembly attractive for general NR-superstructure studies and applications.

    9. Colloidal Crystal Wires (pages 2315–2318)

      Michael Tymczenko, Lluis F. Marsal, Trifon Trifonov, Isabelle Rodriguez, Fernando Ramiro-Manzano, Josep Pallares, Angel Rodriguez, Ramon Alcubilla and Francisco Meseguer

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701526

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      Several configurations of colloidal wires are obtained by infiltration of charge-stabilized polystyrene spheres into cylindrical pores of a silicon membrane (see figure). As channel dimensions are comparable to those of particles, wirelike arrangements are governed by the ratio between the pore diameter and the particle diameter. Also, Coulomb repulsion between particles plays a very important role in the particle ordering.

    10. High-Performance Thin-Film Transistors from Solution-Processed Cadmium Selenide and a Self-Assembled Multilayer Gate Dielectric (pages 2319–2324)

      Paul D. Byrne, Antonio Facchetti and Tobin J. Marks

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702677

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      TFTs based on solution-processed CdSe films as the semiconductor and a solution-processed nanoscopic self-assembled gate dielectric are fabricated. The devices exhibit high electron mobilities at low operating voltages.

    11. Non-Volatile Organic Memory Applications Enabled by In Situ Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles in a Self-Assembled Block Copolymer (pages 2325–2331)

      Wei Lin Leong, Pooi See Lee, Anup Lohani, Yeng Ming Lam, Tupei Chen, Sam Zhang, Ananth Dodabalapur and Subodh G. Mhaisalkar

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702567

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      A block copolymer with Au nanoparticles is shown to exhibit a memory effect, with the Au nanoparticles acting as floating charge storage components for the holes from pentacene in a metal–pentacene–insulator–silicon (MPIS) structure (see figure). This novel structure displays a large memory window of 2.1 V after programming and erasing modes, and excellent retention ability.

    12. Electrospinning of Diphenylalanine Nanotubes (pages 2332–2336)

      Gurvinder Singh, Alexander M. Bittner, Sebastian Loscher, Nikola Malinowski and Klaus Kern

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702802

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      Electrospinning from concentrated diphenylalanine solutions in a low-boiling-point solvent results in tubes that are chemically identical to self-assembled tubes, but show different morphologies, especially extreme lengths. Electrospinning of tubes offers more possibilities for manipulation, for example, bridging electrodes in parallel orientation, a possible patterning strategy for electrospun material.

    13. Complete Band Gaps in the Visible Range Achieved by a Low-Refractive-Index Material (pages 2337–2340)

      Zhi Ren, Tianrui Zhai, Zhaona Wang, Jing Zhou and Dahe Liu

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702698

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      A holography technique to fabricate photonic crystals with self-simulating structures that possess a complete band gap in the visible range is developed. Achieving complete band gaps by this technique can use the common holographic recording materials with low refractive index rather than the materials with high refractive index. The width of the band gap obtained reaches 120 nm.

    14. Exfoliated Sulfonated Poly(arylene ether sulfone)–Clay Nanocomposites (pages 2341–2344)

      Yeong Suk Choi, Tae Kyoung Kim, Eun Ah Kim, Sang Hoon Joo, Chanho Pak, Yoon Hoi Lee, Hyuk Chang and Doyoung Seung

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702131

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      Exfoliated sulfonated poly(arylene sulfone) (sPAS)–laponite clay nanocomposites showed improved mechanical strength and methanol permeability, while maintaining high proton conductivities. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) containing laponite-sPAS membranes showed a performance equal or superior to Nafion-based fuell cells.

    15. Electrically Conductive Dense and Porous Alumina with In-Situ-Synthesized Nanoscale Carbon Networks (pages 2345–2351)

      Ruben L. Menchavez, Masayoshi Fuji and Minoru Takahashi

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701897

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      Electrically conductive dense and porous alumina compacts are fabricated by sintering dried gel-cast alumina samples with a homogeneous gel-binder distribution under an argon atmosphere. Sintering at an optimal temperature of 1700 °C leads to the uniform formation of electrically conductive nanoscale graphitic conduits throughout the composite, as shown in the figure.

    16. Sensitivity Enhancement of Surface-Plasmon Resonance Imaging by Nanoarrayed Organothiols (pages 2352–2358)

      Patrícia Lisboa, Andrea Valsesia, Ilaria Mannelli, Stephane Mornet, Pascal Colpo and François Rossi

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702736

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      Crystalline organothiol nanoarrays improve the detection sensitivity of surface-plasmon resonance (SPR) by a factor of five in comparison to noncrystalline nanopatterns and uniformly carboxylic surfaces. SPR images taken during the detection of an immunoreaction show a brighter color in the nanoarray area of the surface, which is the result of higher detection sensitivity. Sensor surfaces with nanoarrays may therefore provide future applications for the immobilization of biomolecules on biosensing surfaces.

    17. High-Triplet-Energy Poly(9,9′-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-3,6-fluorene) as Host for Blue and Green Phosphorescent Complexes (pages 2359–2364)

      Zhonglian Wu, Yan Xiong, Jianhua Zou, Lei Wang, Jincheng Liu, Qiliang Chen, Wei Yang, Junbiao Peng and Yong Cao

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800213

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      A novel polyfluorene with high triplet energy level the soluble conjugated homopolymer poly(9,9′-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-3,6-fluorene)) (P36EHF) is successfully synthesized and characterized. Preliminary results indicate that P36EHF could be a good host material for green and blue phosphorescent complexes (see figure), making it a wide-bandgap conjugated polymer host suitable for blue- or green-phosphorescent polymer LEDs.

    18. Biocatalytic Growth of Au Nanoparticles Immobilized on Glucose Oxidase Enhances the Ferrocene-Mediated Bioelectrocatalytic Oxidation of Glucose (pages 2365–2370)

      Yi-Ming Yan, Ran Tel-Vered, Omer Yehezkeli, Zoya Cheglakov and Itamar Willner

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703128

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      Glucose oxidase, GOx, functionalized with Au nanoparticles is linked to a Au electrode. The biocatalytic enlargement of the Au nanoparticles yields a matrix for the immobilization of electroactive ferrocene units and the improved charge transport through the assembly enhances the ferrocene-mediated bioelectrocatalytic activation of the enzyme.

    19. Sequestering Gold Nanorods by Polymer Microgels (pages 2371–2375)

      Mallika Das, Leo Mordoukhovski and Eugenia Kumacheva

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702860

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      Cationic nanorods can be efficiently sequestered into cationic, neutral and anionic polyacrylamide microgels, with a loading capacity almost independent of the charge of the microgels. These results indicate that electrostatic forces do not dominate interactions between the nanorods and microgels.

    20. Polymer Solar Cells That Use Self-Assembled-Monolayer- Modified ZnO/Metals as Cathodes (pages 2376–2382)

      Hin-Lap Yip, Steven K. Hau, Nam Seob Baek, Hong Ma and Alex K.-Y. Jen

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703050

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      A simple solution-deposition method is developed to fabricate polymer solar cells that comprise a SAM-modified ZnO/metal bilayer cathode. The contact properties between the ZnO and metal can be enhanced by interfacial modification with a series of carboxylic acid-based dipolar SAMs. This finding provides a new strategy for very effective contact engineering in organic optoelectronic devices.

    21. Plasma-Polymerized Multistacked Organic Bipolar Films: A New Approach to Flexible High-κ Dielectrics (pages 2383–2388)

      Dhiman Bhattacharyya, Woo-Jun Yoon, Paul R. Berger and Richard B. Timmons

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702981

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      Multilayered, ultrathin bipolar films are produced by alternating plasma polymerization of carboxylic acid and amine monomers. The resultant films offer a potential new route to development of all-polymeric, high-k dielectrics for use in production of flexible electronics.

    22. Electrical Detection of Femtomolar DNA via Gold-Nanoparticle Enhancement in Carbon-Nanotube-Network Field-Effect Transistors (pages 2389–2393)

      Xiaochen Dong, Ching Man Lau, Anup Lohani, Subodh G. Mhaisalkar, Johnson Kasim, Zexiang Shen, Xinning Ho, John A. Rogers and Lain-Jong Li

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702798

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      A dramatic sensitivity enhancement in electrical detection of DNA hybridization using single-walled carbon nanotube networked field effect transistors (SNFETs) via introducing reporter DNA-Au nanoparticle (AuNP) conjugates in the hybridization step is reported. The amplified change in drain current allows to reliably determine the DNA concentration down to ∼100 fM.

    23. Synthesis and Characteristics of a Phase-Change Magnetic Material (pages 2394–2397)

      Wen-Dong Song, Lu-Ping Shi, Xiang-Shui Miao and Chong-Tow Chong

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702282

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      A phase-change magnetic material is synthesized by doping the known Ge[BOND]Sb[BOND]Te phase-change material with Fe, and its properties are compared with the parent chalcogenide material (see figure). Besides different optical (reflectivity) and electrical properties in the amorphous and crystalline states, its magnetic properties are different in the two states; a fact that can be used to realize the fast control of ferromagnetism by phase change.

    24. Efficient, Anhydrous Proton-Conducting Nanofilms of Y-Doped Zirconium Pyrophosphate at Intermediate Temperatures (pages 2398–2404)

      Yuanzhi Li, Toyoki Kunitake, Yoshitaka Aoki and Emi Muto

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702590

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      Nanofilms of Y-doped zirconium pyrophosphate, with a molar composition of Y0.95/Y0.05/P2.64, exhibit high proton conductivities with an area-specific resistance of 0.085 Ω cm2. The films are very stable, even when operating in the flow of dry air at 340 °C for a prolonged period of time (see figure).

    25. Efficient Blue- and White-Emitting Electrophosphorescent Devices Based on Platinum(II) [1,3-Difluoro-4,6-di(2-pyridinyl)benzene] Chloride (pages 2405–2409)

      Xiaohui Yang, Zixing Wang, Sijesh Madakuni, Jian Li and Ghassan E. Jabbour

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702940

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      Efficient blue and white single-doped organic light-emitting devices based a novel platinum complex – platinum(II) [1,3-difluoro-4,6-di(2-pyridinyl)benzene] chloride – are reported (see figure). The blue and white devices show peak efficiencies of 16% and 9% and CIE chromaticity coordinates of (0.15, 0.26) and (0.33, 0.36), respectively. These results demonstrate that the utilization of platinum complexes is a viable approach for the development of blue electrophosphorescent devices.

    26. The Built-In Potential in Blue Polyfluorene-Based Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 2410–2415)

      Vladimir Bodrozic, Thomas M. Brown, Shabbir Mian, Daren Caruana, Matthew Roberts, Nathan Phillips, Jonathan J. Halls, Ilaria Grizzi, Jeremy H. Burroughes and Franco Cacialli

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702346

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      Energy level alignment in polyfluorene-based polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) is studied with electroabsorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Using an active layer containing a blend of three polyfluorenes, it is found that the built-in potential values are determined by the interplay of the contacts' work function and the lowest and highest lying energy levels of the blend components.

    27. You have free access to this content
      Controlling the Assembly of Silver Nanocubes through Selective Functionalization of Their Faces (pages 2416–2420)

      Matthew Rycenga, Joseph M. McLellan and Younan Xia

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800360

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      Silver nanocubes are self-assembled into unique structures via hydrophobic interactions. The structures could be predesigned by selectively functionalizing the faces of each nanocube with hydrophobic and hydrophilic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The cubic lattice shown in this SEM image was formed at an air-water interface from Ag nanocubes whose entire surface had been derivatized with a hydrophobic SAM.

    28. Interfacing Functionalized Carbon Nanohorns with Primary Phagocytic Cells (pages 2421–2426)

      Stéphanie Lacotte, Ainara García, Marion Décossas, Wafa' T. Al-Jamal, Shouping Li, Kostas Kostarelos, Sylviane Muller, Maurizio Prato, Hélène Dumortier and Alberto Bianco

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702753

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      Functionalized carbon nanohorns (f-CNH) are uptaken by macrophages, without affecting cell viability. f-CNH induce the production of reactive oxygen species and of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The level of inflammation, although moderate, should be taken into consideration when using f-CNH for drug delivery. However, it could be exploited as an intrinsic f-CNH adjuvant function for biomedical applications requiring some activation of the immune system.

    29. Photoconductivity of a Single Small-Molecule Organic Nanowire (pages 2427–2432)

      Xiujuan Zhang, Jiansheng Jie, Wenfeng Zhang, Chengyi Zhang, Linbao Luo, Zhubin He, Xiaohong Zhang, Wenjun Zhang, Chunsing Lee and Shuittong Lee

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800351

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      The photoconductivity of a methyl squarylium (MeSq) single-nanowire device shows a high light sensitivity, wavelength-dependent photoresponse, good response speed, and excellent stability and reproducibility. Nanodevices fabricated on flexible substrates (see figure) exhibit good mechanical bendability and no obvious change in performance after bending to a curvature of 0.5 cm−1.

    30. Guanosine-based Hydrogen-bonded Scaffolds: Controlling the Assembly of Oligothiophenes (pages 2433–2438)

      Gian Piero Spada, Stefano Lena, Stefano Masiero, Silvia Pieraccini, Mathieu Surin and Paolo Samorì

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703177

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      The scaffolding of a π-conjugated oligomer, namely terthiophene, is achieved by taking advantage of the self-assembly of a guanosine derivative into highly directional H-bonded networks. Reversible interconversion allows switching between ribbons and quartet-based assemblies in solution. The self-assembly of 1 on surfaces lead to large lamellae of straight ribbons, ultimately forming 1D conjugated arrays as prototypes of supramolecular nanowires.

    31. Demonstration of Bulk Semiconductor Optical Properties in Processable Ag2S and EuS Nanocrystalline Systems (pages 2439–2443)

      Vanessa M. Huxter, Tihana Mirkovic, P. Sreekumari Nair and Gregory D. Scholes

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702429

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      EuS and Ag2S colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are observed to display optical properties characteristic of the corresponding bulk materials, yet have the desirable processing properties of colloidal nanocrystals. We envision that bulk nanoparticles will play a complementary role to quantum-confined structures as another building block for the development of new technologies.

  6. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Corrections
    9. Index
    1. Diamond Nanoparticles: Jewels for Chemistry and Physics (pages 2445–2449)

      Anke Krueger

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701856

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      Nanodiamond has become an attractive material for various applications. Its synthesis by detonation or shock wave is up-scalable, its surface can be functionalized, and the possible applications include composites, biolabels, and electronic devices. This Research News article discusses the recent developments in the field of nanoscale diamond particles.

  7. Corrections

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Corrections
    9. Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Random Circuit Breaker Network Model for Unipolar Resistance Switching

      Seung Chul Chae, Jae Sung Lee, Sejin Kim, Shin Buhm Lee, Seo Hyoung Chang, Chunli Liu, Byungnam Kahng, Hyunjung Shin, Dong-Wook Kim, Chang Uk Jung, Sunae Seo, Myoung-Jae Lee and Tae Won Noh

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890049

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      Self-Organized Buffer Layers in Organic Solar Cells

      Qingshuo Wei, Takeshi Nishizawa, Keisuke Tajima and Kazuhito Hashimoto

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890050

  8. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Corrections
    9. Index
    1. Author Index and Subject Index Adv. Mater. 12/2008 (pages 2451–2452)

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890048

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