Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 20 Issue 16

August 18, 2008

Volume 20, Issue 16

Pages 2991–3182, A1–A16

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Anniversary
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Cover Picture: (Adv. Mater. 16/2008)

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890064

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      In 2008, Advanced Materials celebrates 20 years of bringing our readers the very best in materials research. Check out our special celebration section, which features essays, tributes, a timeline and the geography of Advanced Materials. See which communications and reviews were most cited and most downloaded from Wiley Interscience, and who their authors were. Find out more about the launch of the journal, and our expectations for the future.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Anniversary
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Inside Front Cover: Chemical Control of Local Doping in Organic Thin-Film Transistors: From Depletion to Enhancement (Adv. Mater. 16/2008)

      Peter Pacher, Alexandra Lex, Veronika Proschek, Harald Etschmaier, Elena Tchernychova, Meltem Sezen, Ullrich Scherf, Werner Grogger, Gregor Trimmel, Christian Slugovc and Egbert Zojer

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890065

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      The image background shows an elemental map of a cross-section through an organic thin-film transistor containing a chemically reactive interfacial layer, as determined by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy. The layout of the device (shown in the foreground) allows the realization of a transistor whose threshold voltage can be shifted by up to 60 volts upon exposure to ammonia switching its mode of operation from depletion to enhancement, as reported by Egbert Zojer and co-workers on p. 3143.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Anniversary
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 16/2008) (pages 2991–3001)

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890066

  4. Anniversary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Anniversary
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. ADVANCED MATERIALS 20TH ANNIVERSARY (pages A1–A16)

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890067

  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Anniversary
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Ramping Up (pages 3003–3004)

      David Flanagan and Lisa Wylie

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802015

      Up, up and away: An increased ISI Impact Factor for 2007 shows that Advanced Materials continues to enjoy the complete confidence of the community when it comes to publishing the top research in materials science. Falling publication times and an expansion of the editorial team this year means that we are better equipped than ever to bring our readers the best in materials science.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Anniversary
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Micropatterning Layers by Flame Aerosol Deposition-Annealing (pages 3005–3010)

      Antonio Tricoli, Markus Graf, Felix Mayer, Stéphane Kuühne, Andreas Hierlemann and Sotiris E. Pratsinis

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701844

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      A flame process for in situ synthesis and micropatterned deposition of highly porous, self-assembled, lace-like nanostructured layers of pure or Pt-doped SnO2 is presented. These layers are stabilized in situ by rapid flame annealing that results in transparent cauliflower-like layers with strong adhesion to substrates containing integrated circuitry, while exhibiting high CO sensitivity (f).

    2. Non-Lithographic Wrinkle Nanochannels for Protein Preconcentration (pages 3011–3016)

      Seok Chung, Jeong Hoon Lee, Myoung-Woon Moon, Jongyoon Han and Roger D. Kamm

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701715

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      A simple, non-lithographic method to create a nanofluidic channel array that exploits wrinkles is demonstrated. The dimension and position of the wrinkles can be precisely controlled, producing wrinkle nanochannels (WNCs) that range in size from several tens of nanometers to micrometers. The usefulness of the WNCs is demonstrated by preconcentration of a protein, which is shown to vary linearly. Preconcentration levels of more than 100 can be achieved within 10 minutes.

    3. Temperature Tuning of Nonlinear Exciton Processes in Self-Assembled Oligophenyl Nanofibers under Laser Action (pages 3017–3021)

      Francesco Quochi, Michele Saba, Fabrizio Cordella, Agnieszka Gocalinska, Riccardo Corpino, Marco Marceddu, Alberto Anedda, Andrei Andreev, Helmut Sitter, Niyazi Serdar Sariciftci, Andrea Mura and Giovanni Bongiovanni

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800509

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      Low-temperature suppression of nonlinear losses leads to improvement in nanosecond lasing threshold of self-assembled oligophenyl nanofibers by two orders of magnitude. Laser dynamics is revealed by time-resolved photoluminescence excited by femtosecond and nanosecond pulses. Strategies are discussed to extend low-threshold operation of nanofiber lasers to room temperature.

    4. Alignment of Lamellar Block Copolymers via Electrohydrodynamic-Driven Micropatterning (pages 3022–3027)

      Nicoleta E. Voicu, Sabine Ludwigs and Ullrich Steiner

      Article first published online: 15 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702970

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      The alignment of lamellar block copolymer in cylindrical confinement is investigated. Liquefied polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer films exposed to an electric field form micrometer-sized columns with the lamellae aligned parallel to the cylinder axis. The lateral arrangement of the lamellae is determined by the interplay of surface tension, lateral components of the applied electric field, and the bending of the lamellae.

    5. High Tensile Ductility and Strength in Bulk Nanostructured Nickel (pages 3028–3033)

      Yonghao Zhao, Troy Topping, John F. Bingert, Jeremy J. Thornton, Andrea M. Dangelewicz, Ying Li, Wei Liu, Yuntian Zhu, Yizhang Zhou and Enrique J. Lavernia

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800214

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      Both high tensile ductility and high strength are achieved in bulk multimodal (Multi-Ni) and bimodal (Bi-Ni) nanostructured nickel, synthesized by cryomilling and subsequent quasi-isostatic forging processes. The relatively low tensile ductility of bulk nanostructured materials has been a major obstacle for their practical applications. This work provides a new approach for fabricating bulk nanostructured materials with both high ductility and strength.

    6. A Novel Approach to Observing Synergy Effects of PHSRN on Integrin–RGD Binding Using Intelligent Surfaces (pages 3034–3038)

      Mitsuhiro Ebara, Masayuki Yamato, Takao Aoyagi, Akihiko Kikuchi, Kiyotaka Sakai and Teruo Okano

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702308

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      A novel assay for measuring time-dependant ligand-receptor affinity changes is developed based on a peptide-immobilized temperature-responsive surface, as schematically illustrated in the figure. The grafted thermoresponsive polymer acts as an “on-off” switch for mediating integrin–peptide bonding. At temperatures above and below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), the peptides are accessible and shielded from integrin access, respectively.

    7. Highly Luminescent Flexible Quantum Dot–Clay Films (pages 3039–3043)

      Hiroyuki Tetsuka, Takeo Ebina and Fujio Mizukami

      Article first published online: 23 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702544

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      Highly luminescent flexible CdSe/ZnS-clay films with a well-organized structure can be prepared by simple casting of aqueous dispersions of nanocrystals and clay. Through electrostatic interactions, negatively charged CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals are incorporated into the spaces between the positively charged edges of clay platelets. A substantial enhancement in photoluminescence efficiency is observed by introducing thermal annealing.

    8. Surfactant-Free, Melt-Processable Metal–Polymer Hybrid Materials: Use of Graphene as a Dispersing Agent (pages 3044–3049)

      Norman A. Luechinger, Norman Booth, Greg Heness, Sri Bandyopadhyay, Robert N. Grass and Wendelin J. Stark

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800026

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      Graphene coatings on metal nanoparticles work as lubricants and dispersing agents and can fully replace currently used surfactants. These high-temperature-stable metal–polymer hybrid materials can be shaped by injection molding, enabling rapid manufacturing of electrical engines, actuators, and micromachines.

    9. Electrochemical Modification of Graphene (pages 3050–3053)

      Ravi Shankar Sundaram, Cristina Gómez-Navarro, Kannan Balasubramanian, Marko Burghard and Klaus Kern

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800198

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      Nanoparticles on an atomic carpet: Individual graphene sheets have been decorated with metal nanoparticles through electrochemistry. The attachment of Pd particles onto graphene renders it sensitive to hydrogen. The controlled functionalization of graphene paves the way for various electronic applications.

    10. Preparation of Neutral Wetting Brushes for Block Copolymer Films from Homopolymer Blends (pages 3054–3060)

      Shengxiang Ji, Guoliang Liu, Fan Zheng, Gordon S. W. Craig, F. J. Himpsel and Paul F. Nealey

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800048

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      Neutral brush layers are prepared from a ternary blend of two low-molecular-weight homopolymers and their corresponding low-molecular-weight block copolymer. The presence of block copolymer effectively emulsifies the homopolymer mixtures on substrates and mediates their grafting ratios.

    11. Thermoresponsive Hydrogel Photonic Crystals by Three-Dimensional Holographic Lithography (pages 3061–3065)

      Ji-Hwan Kang, Jun Hyuk Moon, Seung-Kon Lee, Sung-Gyu Park, Se Gyu Jang, Shu Yang and Seung-Man Yang

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800141

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      Well-defined three dimensional photonic crystals (PCs) of hydrogels are fabricated by prism holographic lithography over large areas. The hydrogel PCs, swollen in the humidity of air, show a tunable optical stop-band in response to temperature. The thermoresponsive behavior is caused by viscoelastic deformation upon temperature change, which is investigated by capturing the structure with silica.

    12. High-Current-Density CuO x/InZnOx Thin-Film Diodes for Cross-Point Memory Applications (pages 3066–3069)

      Bo Soo Kang, Seung-Eon Ahn, Myoung-Jae Lee, Genrikh Stefanovich, Ki Hwan Kim, Wen Xu Xianyu, Chang Bum Lee, Youngsoo Park, In Gyu Baek and Bae Ho Park

      Article first published online: 15 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702932

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      Room-temperature-deposited CuOxInZnOx thin-film heterojunction diodes show a high current density of 3.5 × 104 A cm−2 and a high on/off current ratio of 106 (see figure). The oxide diode is a promising switch element for three-dimensional stackable memory devices, where high-temperature-prepared silicon diodes are difficult to apply.

    13. Nano- and Micropatterning of Optically Transparent, Mechanically Robust, Biocompatible Silk Fibroin Films (pages 3070–3072)

      Hannah Perry, Ashwin Gopinath, David L. Kaplan, Luca Dal Negro and Fiorenzo G. Omenetto

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800011

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      Regular nanometer-scale patterning down to a few tens of nanometers and the manufacturing of diffractive optical elements in silk by using the ideas of soft lithography is reported. The unique processing of silk films makes them an ideal substrate to incorporate biological matter (such as small organics, enzymes, proteins, cells). Unprecedented definition in the transverse direction, with features down to few tens of nanometers, is reported.

    14. Orientational Transition of Liquid Crystal Molecules by a Photoinduced Transformation Process into a Recovery-free Silicon Oxide Layer (pages 3073–3078)

      Jong Bok Kim, Chu Ji Choi, Jin Seol Park, Sung Jin Jo, Byoung Har Hwang, Min Kyoung Jo, Daeseung Kang, Se Jong Lee, Youn Sang Kim and Hong Koo Baik

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702906

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      The vertical alignment of liquid crystal (LC) on an inorganic silicon oxide layer, which is fabricated by a simple photoinduced transformation process of an ultrathin poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) layer is reported. While the PDMS layer shows a random orientation of LC, the silicon oxide layer, fabricated by UVO treatment, vertically aligns the LC. In addition, the silicon oxide layer shows a stable alignment of LC in harsh conditions.

    15. A Germanium–Carbon Nanocomposite Material for Lithium Batteries (pages 3079–3083)

      Guanglei Cui, Lin Gu, Linjie Zhi, N. Kaskhedikar, Peter A. van Aken, Klaus Müllen and Joachim Maier

      Article first published online: 15 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800586

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      A facile approach to prepare carbon-germanium composite nanoscale spheres with Ge nanoparticles encapsulated by a carbon matrix (see figure) is developed. The method involves solid-state pyrolysis of an intermediate thermally polymerized from tetraallylgermane. The composite exhibits a highly stable and reversible capacity of about 900 mA h g−1 and improved rate performance as an anode material in a Li secondary battery.

    16. Heterogeneous Interfacial Properties of Ink-Jet-Printed Silver Nanoparticulate Electrode and Organic Semiconductor (pages 3084–3089)

      Dongjo Kim, Sunho Jeong, Hyunjung Shin, Younan Xia and Jooho Moon

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702750

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      An in-depth description of the chemical structure and the electronic energy state at the ink-jet-printed metal-nanoparticle electrode/organic semiconductor interface is presented. Surface oxygen atoms induce an interface dipole, which leads to an increase in the work function of the printed electrodes, thus facilitating the injection of charge carriers into the organic semiconductor.

    17. Electrical Nanoscale Training of Piezoelectric Response Leading to Theoretically Predicted Ferroelastic Domain Contributions in PZT Thin Films (pages 3090–3095)

      Simon Bühlmann and Paul Muralt

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701311

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      Piezoelectric contributions from mobile 90° domains are locally activated by electrical training of a PZT thin film. The high response state of 160 pm V−1 corresponds well with theoretical predictions. This state relaxed at modest trainings within minutes but was stabilized after extensive training. Our findings indicate that dramatic domain reconfigurations must take place.

    18. Pro-Ionomers: An Anion Metathesis Approach to Amphiphilic Block Ionomers from Neutral Precursors (pages 3096–3099)

      Tingji Tang, Daniel J. Coady, Andrew J. Boydston, Olga L. Dykhno and Christopher W. Bielawski

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800291

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      Starting from neutral “pro-ionomeric” diblock copolymers, photoluminescent benzobis(imidazolium) (BBI) dihalide salts are used to effect anion metathesis, affording fluorescent block ionomers in a single step. In aqueous media, the ionomers self-assemble into either core- or shell-crosslinked micellular structures, depending on the copolymer and BBI used (see figure).

    19. Enhancement of the External Quantum Efficiency of a Silicon Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Diode by Localized Surface Plasmons (pages 3100–3104)

      Beak-Hyun Kim, Chang-Hee Cho, Jin-Soo Mun, Min-Ki Kwon, Tae-Young Park, Jong Su Kim, Clare Chisu Byeon, Jongmin Lee and Seong-Ju Park

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703096

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      The electroluminescence intensity of a silicon quantum dot (Si QD) light-emitting diode (LED) with an Ag layer containing Ag particles can be enhanced by 434% relative to a Si QD LED without an Ag layer. The large enhancement is attributed to an increase in radiative quantum efficiency as a result of coupling between Si QDs and localized surface plasmons and increased current injection efficiency through improved carrier tunneling into Si QDs.

    20. Direct Formation of PbS Nanorods in a Conjugated Polymer (pages 3105–3109)

      Alexandros Stavrinadis, Richard Beal, Jason M. Smith, Hazel E. Assender and Andrew A. R. Watt

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702115

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      Inorganic nanorod/conjugated polymer composites are advanced materials for photovoltaics. It is shown that a post-synthesis treatment of PbS nanocrystal/poly(2-methoxy-5-(2-ethyl-hexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) composites, synthesized by a low-temperature and surfactant-free method, results in the controlled assembly of nanorods through oriented attachment of PbS nanocrystals.

    21. Evidence of Large Voids in Pure-Silica-Zeolite Low-k Dielectrics Synthesized by Spin-on of Nanoparticle Suspensions (pages 3110–3116)

      Salvador Eslava, Mikhail R. Baklanov, Alexander V. Neimark, Francesca Iacopi, Christine E. A. Kirschhock, Karen Maex and Johan A. Martens

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701798

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      Spin-on pure-silica-zeolite or Silicalite films are currently considered as outstanding low-k materials because of their stiffness and ultralow dielectric constant. It is shown that spin-on Silicalite films with low k values unavoidably contain cavities tens of nanometers wide, representing a considerable challenge in their application as on-chip interconnects.

    22. Photo-embossed Surface Relief Structures with an Increased Aspect Ratios by Addition of a Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer Agent (pages 3117–3121)

      Jolke Perelaer, Ko Hermans, Cees W. M. Bastiaansen, Dirk J. Broer and Ulrich S. Schubert

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800124

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      photo-embossed surface relief structures with significantly increased aspect ratios are prepared by addition of a reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer agent. The aspect ratios under inert atmosphere are successfully improved by a factor of almost 10. Moreover, aspect ratios obtained under ambient circumstances, preferred for industrial applications, are also significantly enhanced.

    23. Creating Hierarchical Structures in Renewable Composites by Attaching Bacterial Cellulose onto Sisal Fibers (pages 3122–3126)

      Julasak Juntaro, Marion Pommet, Gerhard Kalinka, Athanasios Mantalaris, Milo S. P. Shaffer and Alexander Bismarck

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703176

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      The growth of bacterial-cellulose nanofibrils on the surfaces of micrometer-scale natural fibers provides a route to a new class of hierarchical, renewable, degradable composites. The nanofibrils improve the interaction between the primary fibers and the matrix, leading to improved mechanical properties and water resistance.

    24. Alternating the Output of a CdS Nanowire Nanogenerator by a White-Light-Stimulated Optoelectronic Effect (pages 3127–3130)

      Yi-Feng Lin, Jinhui Song, Yong Ding, Shih-Yuan Lu and Zhong Lin Wang

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703236

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      The response of a single CdS-nanowire-based nanogenerator to excitation by visible light is investigated. White light reduces the height of the Schottky barrier that existis at the tip nanowire contact, leading to possible barrier breakthrough and a contact-mode change from Schottky to quasi-Ohmic. This work demonstrates the triple coupling among semiconducting, piezoelectric, and optoelectric properties, which may be useful for designing new optopiezotronic devices.

    25. Ultra-thin and Conductive Nanomembrane Arrays for Nanomechanical Transducers (pages 3131–3137)

      Tae June Kang, Misun Cha, Eui Yun Jang, Jaeha Shin, Hyeong Uk Im, Yunho Kim, Junghoon Lee and Yong Hyup Kim

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800274

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      An integrated approach to the fabrication of multilayered nanocomposite membranes from layer-by-layer assembled polymers and single-wall carbon nanotubes is presented. The integrated bottom-up and top-down approach provides multifunctional molecular assemblies of tailored architectures and material properties for various versatile reaction/sensing materials of nanometer thickness, and will enable large-scale, reproducible production of membrane-based, highly integrated microsensors.

    26. Electrically Tunable Color by Using Mixtures of Bent-Core and Rod-Shaped Molecules (pages 3138–3142)

      Geetha G. Nair, Christopher A. Bailey, Stefanie Taushanoff, Katalin Fodor-Csorba, Aniko Vajda, Zoltán Varga, Attila Bóta and Antal Jákli

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800067

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      The voltage dependence of the effective birefringence with corresponding textures for a 1:1 mixture of bent-core and rod-shaped molecules measured in a 5 µm film with planar alignment coating is measured (see figure). The data are fitted assuming rotation of the second director around the main director as illustrated in the lower part. Rectangles indicate the tilt-plane of the bent-core and rod-shape molecules.

    27. Chemical Control of Local Doping in Organic Thin-Film Transistors: From Depletion to Enhancement (pages 3143–3148)

      Peter Pacher, Alexandra Lex, Veronika Proschek, Harald Etschmaier, Elena Tchernychova, Meltem Sezen, Ullrich Scherf, Werner Grogger, Gregor Trimmel, Christian Slugovc and Egbert Zojer

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800058

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      An organic field-effect transistor can be switched chemically from depletion (normally on) to enhancement (normally off) mode by inserting a reactive thin layer comprising sulfonyl chloride and sulfonic acid functionalities. Upon exposure of the devices to alkaline gases, such as ammonia, a shift of the threshold voltage of up to 60 V is achieved.

    28. Size-Dependence and Elasticity of Liquid-Crystalline Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (pages 3149–3154)

      Wenhui Song and Alan H. Windle

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702972

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      Profound size-effects of liquid-crystalline microstructures of multiwalled carbon nanotube dispersions are reported. The figure shows that nanotubes behave like rigid rods in the case of a low aspect ratio; however, they behave as flexible beams that deform easily following the local orientation in a liquid crystalline field if they are thin and/or long with a relatively high aspect ratio.

    29. Dense Self-Assembly on Sparse Chemical Patterns: Rectifying and Multiplying Lithographic Patterns Using Block Copolymers (pages 3155–3158)

      Joy Y. Cheng, Charles T. Rettner, Daniel P. Sanders, Ho-Cheol Kim and William D. Hinsberg

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800826

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      A lithography-friendly self-assembly process which multiplies and rectifies an existing resist patterns is demonstrated here. A polymer film (right figure) has assembled at a 14 nm half-pitch on a thin resist pattern at twice the period (left figure). This directed self-assembly process dramatically heals defects and reduces feature size variation of the ill-defined resist patterns.

    30. Molecular-Controlled Fracture and Release of Templated Nanoporous Organosilicate Thin Films (pages 3159–3164)

      Markus D. Ong, Willi Volksen, Geraud Dubois, Victor Lee, Phillip J. Brock, Vaughn R. Deline, Robert D. Miller and Reinhold H. Dauskardt

      Article first published online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702665

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      Molecular interactions between templating porogen particles and the underlying substrate can be exploited to create a controlled release mechanism while maintaining the bulk properties of the matrix material. Furthermore, these interactions can be reversed by priming the substrate with a hydrophobic layer to produce a strong interface with a nanoporous layer.

    31. Photoluminescent n-Type Porous Silicon Fabricated in the Dark (pages 3165–3168)

      Shi Qiang Li, T. L. Sudesh L. Wijesinghe and Daniel J. Blackwood

      Article first published online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800090

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      A simple technique for the fabrication of optically active porous silicon (PSi) in the dark on n-type substrates is presented. This solves the long-standing problem that n-type photoluminsecnt porous silicon can only form under illumination. Strong visible red photoluminescence is demonstrated.

    32. A Nanostructured Sn–C Composite Lithium Battery Electrode with Unique Stability and High Electrochemical Performance (pages 3169–3175)

      Jusef Hassoun, Gaelle Derrien, Stefania Panero and Bruno Scrosati

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702928

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      A refined, nanostructured Sn–C composite with unique chemical stability is prepared and characterized. It is shown that this material can be used as an electrode in lithium cells with excellent electrochemical performance. These properties make the Sn–C nanocomposite a very promising, new type of negative electrode for advanced lithium ion batteries.

  7. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Anniversary
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Exploiting Ionic Coupling in Electronic Devices: Electrolyte-Gated Organic Field-Effect Transistors (pages 3177–3180)

      Matthew J. Panzer and C. Daniel Frisbie

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800617

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      Ionic motion facilitates the injection of large electronic charge carrier densities in electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors (see figure). Substantial electric double layer capacitances (CEDL) combine in series to strongly couple the applied electrostatic gate potential to the organic semiconductor layer.

  8. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Anniversary
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Author Index and Subject Index Adv. Mater. 16/2008 (pages 3181–3182)

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890068

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