Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 20 Issue 19

October 2, 2008

Volume 20, Issue 19

Pages 3577–3772

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Index
    1. Cover Picture: Hierarchical Assembly of Multilayered Hollow Microspheres from an Amphiphilic Pharmaceutical Molecule of Azithromycin (Adv. Mater. 19/2008)

      Hong Zhao, Jian-Feng Chen, Yong Zhao, Lei Jiang, Jing-Wei Sun and Jimmy Yun

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890077

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover represents a template-free method by hierarchical assembly of azithromycin molecules to form hollow microspheres with multilayered porous shells. Jian-Feng Chen, Lei Jiang, and co-workers report on p. 3682 this simple, rapid, and high-yielding method, which allows the number of layers to be tailored by regulating the initial concentration of the azithromycin solution. Such structures may find applications in controlled drug delivery, amongst other fields.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Index
    1. Inside Front Cover: NIR Laser-Driven Reversible Volume Phase Transition of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Composite Gels (Adv. Mater. 19/2008)

      Tsuyohiko Fujigaya, Tatsuro Morimoto, Yasuro Niidome and Naotoshi Nakashima

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890078

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The inside cover shows that polymer gels composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit a repeatable volume phase transition between shrinkage and swelling upon ON/OFF near-IR laser-light irradiation in the presence of water. The volume changes, triggered by the photothermal effect of CNTs, are repeatable for more than 1200 cycles. In their Communication on p. 3610, Tsuyohiko Fujigaya, Naotoshi Nakaashima, and co-workers emphasize that one of the great advantages of utilizing CNTs in this system is their high durability.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Index
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 19/2008) (pages 3577–3586)

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890079

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Index
    1. Scanning Photoemission Microscopy of Graphene Sheets on SiO2 (pages 3589–3591)

      Ki-jeong Kim, Hangil Lee, Jae-Hyun Choi, Young-Sang Youn, Junghun Choi, Hankoo Lee, Tai-Hee Kang, M. C. Jung, H. J. Shin, Hu-Jong Lee, Sehun Kim and Bongsoo Kim

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800742

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Scanning photoemission microscopy (SPEM) images of a graphene flake as well as the C 1s core level spectra for the mono- and multilayer graphene are measured. The samples with lateral dimensions on the micrometer scale are prepared on a SiO2 surface by direct exfoliation of crystalline graphite. Monolayer graphene is distinguished from the multilayer graphens through the chemical contrast images of SPEM.

    2. Aqueous Near-Infrared Fluorescent Composites Based on Apoferritin-Encapsulated PbS Quantum Dots (pages 3592–3596)

      Barbara Hennequin, Lyudmila Turyanska, Teresa Ben, Ana M. Beltrán, Sergio I. Molina, Mei Li, Stephen Mann, Amalia Patanè and Neil R. Thomas

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800530

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      PbS nanocrystals entrapped in the hollow core of apoferritin protein cages are synthesized in aqueous solution by both reassembly and nanoreactor routes. In both cases, apoferritin limits the size of the PbS quantum dot it can encapsulate to 8 nm and provides a route to the creation of a stable near-infrared fluorescent composite.

    3. Mount-Etna-Lava-Supported Nanocarbons for Oxidative Dehydrogenation Reactions (pages 3597–3600)

      Dang Sheng Su, Xiaowei Chen, Xi Liu, Juan Jose Delgado, Robert Schlögl and Andreja Gajović

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800323

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      Catalysis rocks! Basalt lava erupted from Mount Etna containing iron oxide particles can be used as catalysts and supports to synthesize and immobilize carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. The obtained composites are highly active and stable catalysts for butadiene and styrene production. The whole process is energy-saving, environmentally friendly, technically feasible, and with great potential for industrialization: no wet-chemical pretreatment of the lava or catalyst activation is needed.

    4. Optical Switching of a Birefringent Photonic Crystal (pages 3601–3604)

      Zhuo-Ying Xie, Li-Guo Sun, Guo-Zhi Han and Zhong-Ze Gu

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800495

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Photonic crystals with photocontrollable polarization-dependent stop-bands are fabricated by infiltrating photoresponsive nematic liquid crystals into a stretched polymer inverse opal. When the liquid crystal is in a nematic phase, molecules aligned along the stretching axis generate an optical birefringent effect, which disappears when the liquid crystal is in an isotropic phase. The two states can be reversibly switched by UV-vis light irradiation.

    5. Carbon-Nanotube-Enabled Vertical Field Effect and Light-Emitting Transistors (pages 3605–3609)

      Bo Liu, Mitchell A. McCarthy, Youngki Yoon, Do Young Kim, Zhuangchun Wu, Franky So, Paul H. Holloway, John R. Reynolds, Jing Guo and Andrew G. Rinzler

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800601

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In contrast to typical metals, carbon nanotubes are shown to form a unique Schottky barrier contact with semiconductors wherein a gate field can modulate not only the band bending in the semiconductor but also the height of the barrier. These phenomena are exploited to enable two new device architectures: a vertical field-effect transistor (figure) and a vertical light-emitting transistor.

    6. NIR Laser-Driven Reversible Volume Phase Transition of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Composite Gels (pages 3610–3614)

      Tsuyohiko Fujigaya, Tatsuro Morimoto, Yasuro Niidome and Naotoshi Nakashima

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800494

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Composite polymer gels composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and CNTs exhibit a repeatable volume phase transition between shrinkage and swelling upon ON/OFF NIR laser-light irradiation. The volume change is repeatable for more than 1200 cycles, indicating that the gel has an extremely high durability. The local and transient heat via the irradiation raised the temperature at the spot area in the gel through a photothermal conversion effect of the CNTs, thus inducing this volume change.

    7. Converting Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes into Semiconductors by Boron/Nitrogen Co-Doping (pages 3615–3619)

      Zhi Xu, Wengang Lu, Wenlong Wang, Changzhi Gu, Kaihui Liu, Xuedong Bai, Enge Wang and Hongjie Dai

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800830

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electronic transport measurements on boron/nitrogen co-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (BCN-SWNTs) have been performed to determine their metallic or semiconducting character. The results obtained from a large number of BCN-SWNT-based field-effect transistors indicate that the as-grown BCN-SWNTs are purely semiconducting, while the undoped C-SWNTs consist of only about 70% semiconducting nanotubes.

    8. Transition Metal Borides: Superhard versus Ultra-incompressible (pages 3620–3626)

      Qinfen Gu, Günter Krauss and Walter Steurer

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703025

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Borides of several heavy transition metals have been synthesized by arc melting at ambient pressure. The materials are characterized by either low compressibility or high hardness, some of them showing a good compromise between both properties. The structure–property relationship is revealed based on their crystal structures and a chemical bonding analysis by means of the electron localization function.

    9. Reversible Lithium-Ion Insertion in Molybdenum Oxide Nanoparticles (pages 3627–3632)

      Se-Hee Lee, Yong-Hyun Kim, Rohit Deshpande, Philip A. Parilla, Erin Whitney, Dane T. Gillaspie, Kim M. Jones, A. Harv Mahan, Shengbai Zhang and Anne C. Dillon

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800999

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Li-ion battery anodes fabricated from crystalline MoO3 nanoparticles display an anomalous reversible capacity of 630 mAhg−1 when cycled at high rate. The nanoparticle anodes show no degradation in capacity for 150 cycles, where micron sized MoO3 particles are shown to fail after several cycles. Theoretical calculations elucidate the Li-ion intercalation mechanism and explain the reversible capacity.

    10. Nanosegregated Amorphous Composites of Calcium Carbonate and an Organic Polymer (pages 3633–3637)

      Yuya Oaki, Satoshi Kajiyama, Tatsuya Nishimura, Hiroaki Imai and Takashi Kato

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800773

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transparent and stable composites of calcium carbonate and an acidic macromolecule are obtained at mild conditions. The nanosegregated structure is formed in the amorphous composite materials in the bulk and thin-film states. The transparent, stable, and crack-free thin films might be beneficial for coating of materials.

    11. Nanocrystals of the Quaternary Thermoelectric Materials: AgPbmSbTem+2 (m = 1–18): Phase-Segregated or Solid Solutions? (pages 3638–3642)

      Indika U. Arachchige, Jinsong Wu, Vinayak P. Dravid and Mercouri G. Kanatzidis

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801116

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Facile synthesis of a series of thermoelectrically relevant AgPbmSbTem+2 (m = 1–18) nanoparticles (see figure) is carried out by using a colloidal synthetic route. As-synthesized nanocrystals are spherical in geometry and adopt a cubic NaCl-type structure. These quaternary nanocrystals behave as solid solutions at room temperature and tend to phase separate into AgSbTe2 and PbTe upon annealing at moderately high temperature.

    12. Surfactant-Assisted Orientation of Thin Diblock Copolymer Films (pages 3643–3648)

      Jeong Gon Son, Xavier Bulliard, Huiman Kang, Paul F. Nealey and Kookheon Char

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800670

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The addition of surfactants, which preferentially interact with the PMMA block domains, modifies the surface energy of the system by making the surface energy difference between the two blocks almost equal, resulting in the perpendicular orientation of microphase separated domains in the film.

    13. Terahertz Photonic Crystals Based on Barium Titanate/Polymer Nanocomposites (pages 3649–3653)

      Joseph Lott, Chen Xia, Louis Kosnosky, Christoph Weder and Jie Shan

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800531

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymeric materials with engineered refractive indices for applications in the THz regime can be fabricated and processed by conventional melt-processing of inorganic nanomaterials and conventional host polymers. The approach opens up new opportunities for the creation of optical elements to manipulate the technologically relevant THz radiation, for example photonic crystals.

    14. Enhanced Thermoelectric Properties of Core/Shell Heterostructure Nanowire Composites (pages 3654–3656)

      Genqiang Zhang, Wei Wang and Xiaoguang Li

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800162

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microstructure analysis indicates that Te/Bi core/shell nanowires are formed by a solution phase epitaxial growth process. The obtained Te/Bi core/shell nanowire composites possess a greatly enhanced Seebeck coefficient and a lowered thermal conductivity.

    15. A High-Efficiency Solution-Deposited Thin-Film Photovoltaic Device (pages 3657–3662)

      David B. Mitzi, Min Yuan, Wei Liu, Andrew J. Kellock, S. Jay Chey, Vaughn Deline and Alex G. Schrott

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800555

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-quality Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) films are deposited from hydrazine-based solutions and are employed as absorber layers in thin-film photovoltaic devices. The CIGS films exhibit tunable stoichiometry and well-formed grain structure without requiring post-deposition high-temperature selenium treatment. Devices based on these films offer power conversion efficiencies of 10% (AM1.5 illumination).

    16. Formation Mechanism of Porous Anodic Aluminium and Titanium Oxides (pages 3663–3667)

      Zixue Su and Wuzong Zhou

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800845

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Porous anodic aluminium and titanium oxides are investig ated. An equifield strength model is proposed to explain the formation of the pores and their self-adjustment of ordering. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed a double-layer structure in the anodic titanium oxide nanotubes. It is also shown that the porosity of the porous anodic oxide film is mainly governed by the relative dissociation rate of water.

    17. High-Performance Microring Resonators Fabricated with Multiphoton Absorption Polymerization (pages 3668–3671)

      Linjie Li, Erez Gershgoren, George Kumi, Wei-Yen Chen, P.-T. Ho, Warren N. Herman and John T. Fourkas

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800032

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      The fabrication of high-performance polymeric optical devices is demonstrated using multiphoton absorption polymerization (MAP). Supported waveguides with micrometer-scale diameters sustain high-quality modes with low loss. The performance of microring resonators created with MAP is comparable to that of devices created using more conventional lithographic techniques, but opens the door to the creation of devices with unique architectures.

    18. Single-Crystalline La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 Nanowires by Polymer-Template-Directed Chemical Solution Synthesis (pages 3672–3677)

      Adrián Carretero-Genevrier, Narcis Mestres, Teresa Puig, Awatef Hassini, Judith Oró, Alberto Pomar, Felip Sandiumenge, Xavier Obradors and Etienne Ferain

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800487

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A facile polymer-template-aided synthesis is adopted to prepare single crystalline La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 nanowires by chemical solution deposition. The La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 nanowires crystallize in a novel monoclinic phase and exhibit ferromagnetic ordering at room temperature.

    19. Dip-Pen Nanolithography of Bioactive Peptides on Collagen-Terminated Retinal Membrane (pages 3678–3681)

      Rizaldi Sistiabudi and Albena Ivanisevic

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800950

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      Dip-pen nanolithography is used to directly modify freshly dissected eye tissues with biologically active collagen-binding peptide molecules. The results address the challenge of surface heterogeneity and utilize dip-pen nanolithography to control the localization and concentration of molecules on a collagen-terminated tissue-derived surface. This method can allow the development of scaffolds for treatment of age-related macular degeneration.

    20. Hierarchical Assembly of Multilayered Hollow Microspheres from an Amphiphilic Pharmaceutical Molecule of Azithromycin (pages 3682–3686)

      Hong Zhao, Jian-Feng Chen, Yong Zhao, Lei Jiang, Jing-Wei Sun and Jimmy Yun

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703064

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hollow microspheres with multilayered porous shells are formed by a template-free method by hierarchical assembly of azithromycin molecules. This simple, rapid, and high-yielding method allows the number of layers to be tailored by regulating the initial concentration of azithromycin solution. Such structures may find applications in controlled drug delivery amongst other fields.

    21. Self-Exploding Beads Releasing Microcarriers (pages 3687–3691)

      Bruno G. De Geest, Stefaan De Koker, Kristof Immesoete, Jo Demeester, Stefaan C. De Smedt and Wim E. Hennink

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800907

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-exploding polyelectrolyte-coated gel beads releasing micrometer-sized capsules at the time of explosion consist of degradable hydrogel beads loaded with 3 µm sized layer-by-layer (LbL) microcapsules. When the polyelectrolyte coated gel beads explode, the smaller LbL microcapsules are suddenly released.

    22. The Ferroic Phase Transitions of BiFeO3 (pages 3692–3696)

      Sverre M. Selbach, Thomas Tybell, Mari-Ann Einarsrud and Tor Grande

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800218

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      BiFeO3 displays an abrupt first order transition from the polar structure R3c to centrosymmetric equation image at TC = 830 °C. The ferroelectric transition is associated with abrupt changes in polar cation displacements and a large discontinuous volume. A continuous volume expansion occurs across the second order antiferromagnetic transition at TN = 370 °C. Electronic conductivity anomalies are associated with both phase transitions.

    23. π-σ-Phosphonic Acid Organic Monolayer/Sol–Gel Hafnium Oxide Hybrid Dielectrics for Low-Voltage Organic Transistors (pages 3697–3701)

      Orb Acton, Guy Ting, Hong Ma, Jae Won Ka, Hin-Lap Yip, Neil M. Tucker and Alex K.-Y. Jen

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800810

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Anthryl-alkyl-PA (π-σ-PA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs)/hafnium oxide (HfO2) hybrid dielectrics have been integrated into organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) to achieve operating voltages under −1.5 V. Using π-σ-PA SAMs on sol–gel processed HfO2, pentacene-based OTFTs possess low subthreshold slopes (100 mV dec−1), high on–off current ratios (105–106), and hole mobilities as high as 0.22 cm2 V−1 s−1.

    24. Combinatorial Hierarchically Ordered 2D Architectures Self-assembled from Nanocrystal Building Blocks (pages 3702–3708)

      Xiangxing Xu, Xun Wang, Amjad Nisar, Xin Liang, Jing Zhuang, Shi Hu and Yuan Zhuang

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800215

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A one-step, low-cost, and general nanocrystal self-assembly method that covers both the nanometer-scale superlattice and macroscale ordered patterns—that is, hierarchical architectures—is developed. This approach can generate various functional, compositional, and dimensional combinatorial architectures. It may give new opportunities in applications of catalysis, electronics, energy, magnetic devices, and bio-techniques.

    25. Creating a Molecular-scale Graded Electronic Profile in a Single Polymer to Facilitate Hole Injection for Efficient Blue Electroluminescence (pages 3709–3716)

      Chih-Wei Huang, Kang-Yung Peng, Ching-Yang Liu, Tzu-Hao Jen, Neng-Jye Yang and Show-An Chen

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800109

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Graded electronic profile in single polymer can be established by grafting dual hole-transporting groups onto the polymer structure with finely adjusted spatial and energetic sequence among them. Light emitting devices based on these materials exhibit external quantum efficiencies of 4.54% and 7.53% for deep blue and blue emitting devices, respectively. The present efficiencies for devices with merely simple sandwich structures challenge other polymer-based blue devices to date.

    26. Palladium Oxide Nanoparticles on Nitrogen-Doped Titanium Oxide: Accelerated Photocatalytic Disinfection and Post-Illumination Catalytic “Memory” (pages 3717–3723)

      Qi Li, Yin Wai Li, Pinggui Wu, Rongcai Xie and Jian Ku Shang

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800685

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A visible light photocatalyst is synthesized by dispersing palladium oxide nanoparticles on nitrogen-doped n-titanium oxide. The photocatalyst demonstrates not only a much faster photocatalytic disinfection rate on Escherichia coli under visible light illumination than nitrogen-doped titanium oxide, but also a “memory” catalytic disinfection capability. These unusual antimicrobial properties of TiON/PdO are derived from strong optoelectronic coupling between PdO nanoparticles and TiON semiconductor.

    27. Transparent, Conductive, and Superhydrophobic Films from Stabilized Carbon Nanotube/Silane Sol Mixture Solution (pages 3724–3727)

      Joong Tark Han, Sun Young Kim, Jong Seok Woo and Geon-Woong Lee

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800239

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Variable wettability of hybrid films of thin multiwalled carbon nanotubes and silane sols is achieved by the combination of transparent and conductive carbon nanotubes with the chemical functionality of the silane compound. These superhydrophobic or superhydrophilic films may be available for such applications as the development of self-cleaning coatings for optoelectronics.

    28. Highly Versatile and Robust Materials for Soft Imprint Lithography Based on Thiol-ene Click Chemistry (pages 3728–3733)

      Luis M. Campos, Ines Meinel, Rosette G. Guino, Martin Schierhorn, Nalini Gupta, Galen D. Stucky and Craig J. Hawker

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800330

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      As easy as “shake and bake”, the mixing and photocuring of poly-functional thiols with alkene-functional cross-linkers, via thiol-ene click chemistry, leads to materials with outstanding and tunable characteristics for soft imprint lithography. The materials are cured within 2 minutes at ambient conditions allowing stamps with high aspect ratio and sub-100 nm features to be fabricated.

    29. Engineering Three-Dimensional Micromirror Arrays by Fiber-Drawing Nanomanufacturing for Solar Energy Conversion (pages 3734–3738)

      Zeyu Ma, Liyuan Ma and Ming Su

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fiber-drawing nanomanufacturing is used for the large scale fabrication of glass micromirror arrays with three-dimensional order by differential chemical etching. The arrays can deflect 97% of the incident light away from the incident direction, thus making novel substrates ideal for increased optical paths for a variety of optoelectronic applications including solar cells.

    30. Multi-functionalized Inorganic–Organic Rare Earth Hybrid Microcapsules (pages 3739–3744)

      Xin Liang, Biao Xu, Simin Kuang and Xun Wang

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800894

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A general one step route has been developed for the synthesis of rare-earth inorganic–organic hybrid microcapsules. Hollow capsules and core–shell capsules have been prepared by this facile synthetic route. These multifunctionalized capsules would have wide applications in various fields, such as cell biology, drug delivery, diagnostics, and so on.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Multi-functionalized Inorganic-Organic Rare Earth Hybrid Microcapsules

      Vol. 20, Issue 23, Article first published online: 4 DEC 2008

    31. Highly Sensitive, Air-Stable Photodetectors Based on Single Organic Sub-micrometer Ribbons Self-Assembled through Solution Processing (pages 3745–3749)

      Yan Zhou, Lei Wang, Jian Wang, Jian Pei and Yong Cao

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800336

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly sensitive, air-stable photodetectors based on single sub-micrometer organic crystalline ribbons self-assembled and deposited on the substrate via simple solution processing are achieved on both glass substrates and flexible substrates. The photoconductivity gain is about 1.3 × 103, while the responsivity is about 420 A W−1 at a field of 2 × 104 V cm−1. The highest on/off ratio reaches around 1000.

    32. Ultralow Power Microfuses for Write-Once Read-Many Organic Memory Elements (pages 3750–3753)

      Bianca C. de Brito, Edsger C. P. Smits, Paul A. van Hal, Tom C. T. Geuns, Bert de Boer, Clemens J. M. Lasance, Henrique L. Gomes and Dago M. de Leeuw

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800960

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ultralow power microfuses for write- once read-many organic memory elements that rely on electrolysis of water rather than conventional Joule heating are presented. Gasses formed upon electrolysis cannot escape, the pressure rises, the top electrode delaminates and the electrical contact is lost. The voltage-driven fuses are ideally suited for low-end applications such as in electronic bar codes.

    33. High-Temperature Self-Assembly of Peptides into Vertically Well-Aligned Nanowires by Aniline Vapor (pages 3754–3758)

      Jungki Ryu and Chan Beum Park

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800364

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Treatment of amorphous diphenylalanine thin film at high temperatures as 150 °C with aniline vapor under anhydrous condition results in the formation of vertically well-aligned nanowires. By combining the high-temperature aniline vapor aging method with a simple soft-lithographic technique, we could fabricate a micro-scale pattern of vertically-grown peptide nanowires.

  5. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Index
    1. Sensor Paints (pages 3759–3763)

      Otto S. Wolfbeis

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702276

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Materials that act as “chemical paints” by responding to a (bio)chemical parameter with a change in their optical properties are described here. The object of interest is painted and the color or fluorescence of the paint is monitored by optical imaging methods. This technique represents a simple, new technology to monitor multiple parameters, such as oxygen partial pressure and pH, over relatively large areas and in real time.

    2. Developments and Perspectives of Iron-based High-Temperature Superconductors (pages 3764–3769)

      Hai-Hu Wen

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801623

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The recently discovered iron-based high temperature superconductors provide a new platform for research of superconductivity, probably unconventional in nature. They have many similarities to the cuprates, but also differ in many aspects. Here, a brief introduction to the recent research progress as well as a perspective on these new iron-based superconductors is given.

  6. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Index
    1. Author Index and Subject Index Adv. Mater. 19/2008 (pages 3771–3772)

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890080

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