Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 20 Issue 21

November 3, 2008

Volume 20, Issue 21

Pages 3971–4206

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    10. Communication
    11. Communications
    12. Communication
    13. Communications
    14. Index
    1. Cover Picture: Spatially Localized Photoluminescence at 1.5 Micrometers Wavelength in Direct Laser Written Optical Nanostructures (Adv. Mater. 21/2008)

      Sean Wong, Oliver Kiowski, Manfred Kappes, Jörg K. N. Lindner, Nirajan Mandal, Frank C. Peiris, Geoffrey A. Ozin, Michael Thiel, Markus Braun, Martin Wegener and Georg von Freymann

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890085

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A grand challenge in 3D nanolithography is to place near-IR photoluminescent guests precisely where desired in a high-refractive-index nanostructured host. This objective has now been reduced to practice, as reported by Georg von Freymann, Sean Wong, and coworkers on p. 4097, by using direct laser writing in an As2S3 all-inorganic photoresist doped with Er3+ ions. Such precise placement is considered a key step towards miniaturized optical, electro-optical, and photonic devices. Cover artwork by M.S. Rill.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    10. Communication
    11. Communications
    12. Communication
    13. Communications
    14. Index
    1. Inside Front Cover: Versatile Approach for Integrative and Functionalized Tubes by Strain Engineering of Nanomembranes on Polymers (Adv. Mater. 21/2008)

      Yongfeng Mei, Gaoshan Huang, Alexander A. Solovev, Esteban Bermúdez Ureña, Ingolf Mönch, Fei Ding, Thomas Reindl, Ricky K. Y. Fu, Paul K. Chu and Oliver G. Schmidt

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890086

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A generic approach to engineering tubular micro-/nanostructures out of many different materials with tunable diameters and lengths by precisely releasing and rolling up functional nanomembranes on polymers is reported on p. 4085 by Yongfeng Mei and co-workers. This technology spans different scientific fields ranging from photonics to biophysics and optical ring resonators, magneto-fluidic sensors, remotely controlled microrockets (main image) and 2D confined channels (bottom right) for cell growth guiding are demonstrated.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    10. Communication
    11. Communications
    12. Communication
    13. Communications
    14. Index
  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    10. Communication
    11. Communications
    12. Communication
    13. Communications
    14. Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Warm-Up for 2009 (page 3985)

      Martin Ottmar

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802962

      The heat is on: With the turn of the year advancing upon us, the editorial team at Advanced Materials is warming up for weekly publication. In this editorial, Deputy Editor Martin Ottmar reports on the driving forces for this change, and gives a sneak peek at what you can expect from the journal in 2009.

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    10. Communication
    11. Communications
    12. Communication
    13. Communications
    14. Index
    1. Hollow Micro-/Nanostructures: Synthesis and Applications (pages 3987–4019)

      Xiong Wen (David) Lou, Lynden A. Archer and Zichao Yang

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800854

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hollow micro-/nanostructures are of great interest in many current and emerging areas of technology. This Review is devoted to the progress made in the last decade in synthesis and applications of hollow micro-/nanostructures. Strategies for generating more complex hollow structures, such as rattle-type and non-spherical hollow structures, are also discussed. Applications of hollow structures in lithium batteries, catalysis and sensing, and biomedical applications are reviewed.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    10. Communication
    11. Communications
    12. Communication
    13. Communications
    14. Index
    1. Energy Harvesting Using Nanowires? (pages 4021–4026)

      Marin Alexe, Stephan Senz, Markus Andreas Schubert, Dietrich Hesse and Ulrich Gösele

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800272

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      The present paper focuses on the basic science of the energy harvesting mechanism proposed in the literature to explain how ZnO nanowire-based generators operate. It tries to unveil the signal sources which – based on experiments and theoretical considerations – are different than commonly suggested.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Energy Harvesting Using Nanowires?

      Vol. 20, Issue 24, Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2008

    2. Multi-Dimensional Control of Surfactant-Guided Assemblies of Quantum Gold Particles (pages 4027–4032)

      Qingmin Ji, Somobrata Acharya, Jonathan P. Hill, Gary J. Richards and Katsuhiko Ariga

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801064

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The development of a surfactant-driven route to control multifold assemblies of monodispersed gold nanoparticles dimensions controlled into one, two-, and three dimensional architectures is reported. By using a self-assembly route with careful choice of ligands, a tunable multi-dimensional assembly of quantum-sized gold nanoparticles arranged in a broad range of configurations is achieved.

    3. Grain Orientation Mapping of Polycrystalline Organic Semiconductor Films by Transverse Shear Microscopy (pages 4033–4039)

      Vivek Kalihari, E. B. Tadmor, Greg Haugstad and C. Daniel Frisbie

      Version of Record online: 22 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801834

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A scanning probe technique, termed transverse shear microscopy, produces striking images of grain size, shape, and crystallographic orientation in ultrathin layers of polycrystalline organic semiconductors. The key feature of this novel technique is its ability to generate Grain Orientation Maps that facilitate quantitative analysis of grain alignment and the angular distribution of GBs.

    4. Carbon Nanotube Polycarbonate Composites for Ultrafast Lasers (pages 4040–4043)

      Vittorio Scardaci, Zhipei Sun, Frank Wang, Aleksey G. Rozhin, Tawfique Hasan, Frank Hennrich, Ian H. White, William I. Milne and Andrea C. Ferrari

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800935

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbon nanotube polycarbonate composites with controlled nanotube-bundle size are prepared by dispersion with conjugated polymers followed by blending with polycarbonate. The composite has uniform sub-micrometer nanotube bundles in high concentration, shows strong nonlinear optical absorption, and generates 193 fs pulses when used as passive mode-locker in a fiber laser.

    5. Highly Efficient Patterning of Organic Single-Crystal Transistors from the Solution Phase (pages 4044–4048)

      Stefan C. B. Mannsfeld, Armon Sharei, Shuhong Liu, Mark E. Roberts, Iain McCulloch, Martin Heeney and Zhenan Bao

      Version of Record online: 22 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703244

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic single-crystal and polymer FET arrays can be fabricated using a novel solution-based technique. The patterning of the organic semiconductor is achieved by semiconductor solution droplets selectively wetting the transistor electrode pads. The key advantages of the technique are the cleanliness of the patterning, the patterning speed, and the ultrasmall amount of material required.

    6. Biomimetic Artificial Surfaces Quantitatively Reproduce the Water Repellency of a Lotus Leaf (pages 4049–4054)

      Vassilia Zorba, Emmanuel Stratakis, Marios Barberoglou, Emmanuel Spanakis, Panagiotis Tzanetakis, Spiros H. Anastasiadis and Costas Fotakis

      Version of Record online: 22 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800651

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      Artificially structured surfaces possessing hierarchical micro- and nanostructures are prepared with a one-step production process. These surfaces, exhibiting controlled dual-scale roughness, qualitatively and quantitatively mimic both the structure and the water repellent characteristics of the natural Lotus leaf and constitute one of the most water-repellent artificial surfaces ever reported.

    7. Realization of Ultrahigh Photovoltages with Organic Photovoltaic Nanomodules (pages 4055–4060)

      Michael Niggemann, Wolfgang Graf and Andreas Gombert

      Version of Record online: 9 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801744

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The series interconnection of organic photovoltaic cells on the scale of several hundred nanometres results in 1390 interconnected elementary cells per mm. This organic photovoltaic nanomodule generates the highest reported voltage per length for an organic photovoltaic device. As a first application we demonstrate the switching of an organic field effect transistor with a 590 µm wide photovoltaic nanomodule providing a sufficiently high gate voltage.

    8. Efficient and Flexible ITO-Free Organic Solar Cells Using Highly Conductive Polymer Anodes (pages 4061–4067)

      Seok-In Na, Seok-Soon Kim, Jang Jo and Dong-Yu Kim

      Version of Record online: 29 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800338

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      ITO-free organic solar cells are fabricated on glass and on flexible substrates. The efficiencies of these cells on glass and plastic substrates (3.27% and 2.8%, respectively) were comparable to those of ITO-based devices (3.66% and 2.9%, respectively). Furthermore, in the flexibility test the ITO-free cells on flexible substrates manifested superior mechanical robustness compared with ITO-based cells.

    9. Silica-Coated InP/ZnS Nanocrystals as Converter Material in White LEDs (pages 4068–4073)

      Jan Ziegler, Shu Xu, Erol Kucur, Frank Meister, Miroslaw Batentschuk, Frank Gindele and Thomas Nann

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800724

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      White-LEDs are produced with the addition of a silicone-composite layer containing light-emitting converter material on top of a high-performance blue-LED chip. The color reproduction was significantly improved in comparison with commercially available white-LEDs.

    10. Photonic Ionic Liquids Polymer for Naked-Eye Detection of Anions (pages 4074–4078)

      Xiaobin Hu, Jing Huang, Weixia Zhang, Mohan Li, Chengan Tao and Guangtao Li

      Version of Record online: 9 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800808

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new concept for anion detection in a handy, rapid, and sensitive way is described based on the combination of the unique properties of both ILs and photonic crystals. By simple counteranion exchanging of the pendant IL units, the 3D highly ordered IL porous structure can directly sense different anions and easily convert the anion detection events into readable optical signals with color changes.

  7. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    10. Communication
    11. Communications
    12. Communication
    13. Communications
    14. Index
    1. Clay Bragg Stack Optical Sensors (pages 4079–4084)

      Bettina V. Lotsch and Geoffrey A. Ozin

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800914

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Functional 1D photonic crystals are fabricated based on the clay Laponite and mesoporous oxide layers. Color-tunable clay Bragg stacks are sensitive to a wide range of analytes and show potential as intelligent optical devices for chemo-optical sensing applications.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    10. Communication
    11. Communications
    12. Communication
    13. Communications
    14. Index
    1. Versatile Approach for Integrative and Functionalized Tubes by Strain Engineering of Nanomembranes on Polymers (pages 4085–4090)

      Yongfeng Mei, Gaoshan Huang, Alexander A. Solovev, Esteban Bermúdez Ureña, Ingolf Mönch, Fei Ding, Thomas Reindl, Ricky K. Y. Fu, Paul K. Chu and Oliver G. Schmidt

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801589

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We have developed a generic approach to engineer tubular micro-/nanostructures out of many different materials (see figure) with tunable diameters and lengths by precisely releasing and rolling up functional nanomembranes on polymers. The technology spans across different scientific fields ranging from photonics to biophysics and we demonstrate optical ring resonators, magneto-fluidic sensors, remotely controlled microjets and 2D confined channels for cell growth guiding.

    2. B/SiOx Nanonecklace Reinforced Nanocomposites by Unique Mechanical Interlocking Mechanism (pages 4091–4096)

      Xinyong Tao, Jie Liu, Goutam Koley and Xiaodong Li

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801549

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Necklace-like nanostructures with SiOx beads on boron strings are self-assembled via a facile environment-friendly method at atmospheric pressure. The electrical conductivity of the boron string is a thousand times higher than that of bulk boron. Due to the unique mechanical interlocking between beads and epoxy matrix, the reinforcement effect of the nanonecklaces in epoxy is better than normal carbon nanotubes. B/SiOx nanonecklaces are expected to exhibit unique electrical and mechanical properties for constructing nanodevices and nanocomposites.

  9. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    10. Communication
    11. Communications
    12. Communication
    13. Communications
    14. Index
    1. Spatially Localized Photoluminescence at 1.5 Micrometers Wavelength in Direct Laser Written Optical Nanostructures (pages 4097–4102)

      Sean Wong, Oliver Kiowski, Manfred Kappes, Jörg K. N. Lindner, Nirajan Mandal, Frank C. Peiris, Geoffrey A. Ozin, Michael Thiel, Markus Braun, Martin Wegener and Georg von Freymann

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801508

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A 3D direct laser writing (3D DLW) compatible photoresist, consisting of erbium-doped arsenic trisulfide (Er:As2S3) has been developed. This photoresist simultaneously possess a refractive index (n) of 2.45 and photoluminescence at 1.5 μm wavelength that is also spatially localizable. This enables 3D DLW to produce high-refractive index photonic structures with spatially selective optical activity without the need for post-processing steps.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Spatially Localized Photoluminescence at 1.5 Micrometers Wavelength in Direct Laser Written Optical Nanostructures

      Vol. 20, Issue 23, Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2008

    2. Cooperative Assembly of Block Copolymers with Deformable Interfaces: Toward Nanostructured Particles (pages 4103–4108)

      Seog-Jin Jeon, Gi-Ra Yi and Seung-Man Yang

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801377

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Block copolymers confined in emulsion droplets self-organize into polymeric particles, and cooperative self-assembly driven by deformable interfacial properties produces unprecedented structural motifs such as prolates of stacked lamellae, oblates with biomimetic nanoscale architecture, and spheres with tori or helices (see figure). Interface-mediated structural evolution provides a novel route for synthesizing functional particles with unique nanostructures.

    3. Organic Light-Emitting Field-Effect Transistors Operated by Alternating-Current Gate Voltages (pages 4109–4112)

      Takeshi Yamao, Yasuhiro Shimizu, Kohei Terasaki and Shu Hotta

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800942

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic light-emitting field-effect transistors are operated by a novel method characterized by the application of ac voltages to the gate electrode. This prompts carrier injection from both source and drain electrodes into the organic layer (a thin film or a crystal) without altering the device constitution. Stronger emissions are observed from the device with increasing gate voltage frequencies.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    10. Communication
    11. Communications
    12. Communication
    13. Communications
    14. Index
    1. Synthesis of Nanosized TiO2 by Cationic Polymerization of (µ4-oxido)-hexakis(µ-furfuryloxo)-octakis(furfuryloxo)-tetra-titanium (pages 4113–4117)

      Alexander Mehner, Tobias Rüffer, Heinrich Lang, Andreas Pohlers, Walter Hoyer and Stefan Spange

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801376

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      Interpenetrated inorganic–organic composite materials can be synthesized by twin polymerization of (µ4-oxido)-hexakis(µ-furfuryloxo)-octakis(furfuryloxo)-tetra-titanium. Poly(furfuryl alcohol)/titanium dioxide composites are formed in which the titania species are uniform dispersed. Pure nanosized titanium dioxide (anatase) is obtained after heat and water treatment and removing the organic layer of the composite materials by oxidation.

    2. Highly Efficient Fluorescence of NdF3/SiO2 Core/Shell Nanoparticles and the Applications for in vivo NIR Detection (pages 4118–4123)

      Xue-Feng Yu, Liang-Dong Chen, Min Li, Meng-Yin Xie, Li Zhou, Yan Li and Qu-Quan Wang

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801224

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      NdF3/SiO2 nanoparticles demonstrate highly efficient fluorescence due to successful suppressions of concentration quenching and surface quenching. More interestingly, their excitation and emission peaks with large frequency separation are both in the “near-infrared optical window” of biotissues. In living animal studies, the detecting depth can reach 1 cm by using a small dose of such nanomaterials.

    3. Ruddlesden-Popper-Type Epitaxial Film as Oxygen Electrode for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (pages 4124–4128)

      Atsuo Yamada, Yoshitaka Suzuki, Kazuyuki Saka, Makiko Uehara, Daisuke Mori, Ryoji Kanno, Takanori Kiguchi, Fabrice Mauvy and Jean-Claude Grenier

      Version of Record online: 7 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801199

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      The unexpected SOFC hetero-epitaxial system with large lattice mismatch is demonstrated. A (110)-oriented flat epitaxial film of Nd2NiO4+δ is successfully grown on the (100) surface of yttrium-stabilized zirconia, which realizes selective exposure of the active surface for oxygen reduction. The charge-transfer process is analyzed to be the rate-limiting step with a simple impedance model.

    4. Optofluidic Synthesis of Electroresponsive Photonic Janus Balls with Isotropic Structural Colors (pages 4129–4134)

      Shin-Hyun Kim, Seog-Jin Jeon, Woong Chan Jeong, Hyo Sung Park and Seung-Man Yang

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801167

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electroresponsive photonic Janus balls with optical and electrical anisotropy were prepared using a high-throughput optofluidic device, which produced monodisperse emulsion drops. Self-organized colloidal crystals in emulsion droplets displayed isotropic structural colors in their own respective domains. Electrical anisotropy induced by the presence of carbon black enabled alignment of the balls under the AC electric field.

    5. Formation of Double-Walled TiO2 Nanotubes and Robust Anatase Membranes (pages 4135–4139)

      Sergiu P. Albu, Andrei Ghicov, Saule Aldabergenova, Peter Drechsel, Darren LeClere, George E. Thompson, Jan M. Macak and Patrik Schmuki

      Version of Record online: 29 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801189

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      Anodically grown TiO2 nanotubes have a double-walled structure. The two shells can either be separated or fused together using different thermal annealing treatments. The morphology is determined by the heating rate. Highly regular and robust TiO2 membranes can be obtained with a crystal structure that can be adjusted to an anatase or an anatase/rutile mixture.

    6. Hydroentangling: A Novel Approach to High-Speed Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Membranes (pages 4140–4144)

      Xiangwu Zhang

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801919

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      A tangled web: Hydroentangling, a simple, high-speed, low-cost, environmentally benign textile technology, is used to assemble individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into strong, electrical-conducting, multifunctional CNT nonwoven membranes. Hydroentangled CNT membranes with thicknesses ranging from 80 nm to 1.5 mm can be fabricated in as quick as 5 s per batch or up to 400 m min−1.

    7. Non-Relief-Pattern Lithography Patterning of Solution Processed Organic Semiconductors (pages 4145–4147)

      Sung Kyu Park, Devin A. Mourey, Sankar Subramanian, John E. Anthony and Thomas N. Jackson

      Version of Record online: 29 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801133

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      Patterning of solution processed organic semiconductors demonstrated using a non-relief-pattern, photoresist-free, lithographic process with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) patterned by deep ultraviolet (DUV) irradiation. The patterned, low-surface-energy SAM then steers the organic semiconductor solution into areas where the SAM has been removed by the DUV exposure resulting in organic semiconductor microstructures with good resolution.

    8. Ultrathin Multilayered Films that Promote the Release of Two DNA Constructs with Separate and Distinct Release Profiles (pages 4148–4153)

      Xianghui Liu, Jingtao Zhang and David M. Lynn

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800881

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      ‘Charge-shifting’ cationic polymers are used to fabricate ultrathin multilayered films that promote the release of two different DNA constructs with separate and essentially nonoverlapping release profiles. This approach could contribute to the development of thin films and functional coatings capable of regulating the localized release of different DNA constructs (or other agents) to cells or tissues in a broad range of fundamental and applied contexts.

    9. Bioinspired Surface Immobilization of Hyaluronic Acid on Monodisperse Magnetite Nanocrystals for Targeted Cancer Imaging (pages 4154–4157)

      Yuhan Lee, Haeshin Lee, Young Beom Kim, Jaeyoon Kim, Taeghwan Hyeon, HyunWook Park, Phillip B. Messersmith and Tae Gwan Park

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800756

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      Hyaluronic-acid immobilized monodisperse magnetic nanocrystals (HA-DN/MNCs) are synthesized. Dopamine, the analogue of 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine responsible for the adhesion properties in proteins excreted by mussels, plays a key role in the surface modification of nanocrystals. HA-DN/MNCs exhibit great stability in aqueous solution, applicable for in vivo targeted-cancer imaging.

    10. Organic Light-Emitting Nanofibers by Solvent-Resistant Nanofluidics (pages 4158–4162)

      Carmela De Marco, Elisa Mele, Andrea Camposeo, Ripalta Stabile, Roberto Cingolani and Dario Pisignano

      Version of Record online: 9 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703033

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      Solvent-resistant nanofluidics is demonstrated as sub-100-nm technology for fabricating organic light-emitting fibers, with superior control over diameter and spatial arrangement. Nanofluidics is carried out with optimal resistance to organic solvents commonly employed to dissolve conjugated polymers. The optically active nanofibers, with diameters around 60 nm, are found to exhibit photoluminescence emission polarized along their axis.

    11. Synthesis of a Nonagglomerated Indium Tin Oxide Nanoparticle Dispersion (pages 4163–4166)

      Richard A. Gilstrap Jr., Charles J. Capozzi, Cantwell G. Carson, Rosario A. Gerhardt and Christopher J. Summers

      Version of Record online: 29 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702556

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      Highly crystalline nonagglomerated ITO colloidal nanoparticles form an optically clear solution in nonpolar solvents. Their ∼5 nm diameter and narrow size distribution is achieved through a fatty acid mediated reaction, that lacks the need for high-temperature annealing.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Synthesis of Nonagglomerated Indium Tin Oxide Nanoparticle Dispersions

      Vol. 20, Issue 24, Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2008

    12. Electron Mobility in a Novel Hyper-branched Phthalocyanine Dendrimer (pages 4167–4171)

      Meng Guo, Xingzhong Yan and Theodore Goodson III

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702637

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A hyper branched phthalocyanine dendrimer with non-Arrhenius and Poole–Frenkel charge-carrier transport characteristics is presented. The fast carrier movement in the system with electron mobility of 104cm2 V–1 s–1 may support that the impressive dielectric response in this system is dominated by polaron hopping and tunneling charge transfer mechanisms.

  11. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    10. Communication
    11. Communications
    12. Communication
    13. Communications
    14. Index
    1. A Dithienylbenzothiadiazole Pure Red Molecular Emitter with Electron Transport and Exciton Self-Confinement for Nondoped Organic Red-Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 4172–4175)

      Ju Huang, Xianfeng Qiao, Yangjun Xia, Xuhui Zhu, Dongge Ma, Yong Cao and Jean Roncali

      Version of Record online: 29 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800730

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An amorphous photoluminescent material based on a dithienylbenzothiadiazole structure has been used for the fabrication of organic red-light-emitting diodes. The synergistic effects of the electron-transport ability and exciton confinement of the emitting material allow for the fabrication of efficient pure-red-light-emitting devices without a hole blocker.

  12. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    10. Communication
    11. Communications
    12. Communication
    13. Communications
    14. Index
    1. Vibration Dynamics of Supra-Crystals of Cobalt Nanocrystals Studied With Femtosecond Laser Pulses (pages 4176–4179)

      Isabelle Lisiecki, Valérie Halté, Christophe Petit, Marie-Paule Pileni and Jean-Yves Bigot

      Version of Record online: 29 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800832

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      Face-centered cubic (fcc) Supra-crystals and disordered assemblies of Co nanocrystals have their time-dependent reflectivity compared using time-resolved confocal microscopy. The differential reflectivity exhibits a behavior strongly dependent on mesoscopic organization, an effect associated with the collective coherent vibration of the cobalt nanocrystals in the fcc superstructure. The coherent vibration is mediated by interdigitated aliphatic chains acting as nanosprings.

    2. Dipolar Chromophore Functional Layers in Organic Field Effect Transistors (pages 4180–4184)

      Peerasak Paoprasert, Byoungnam Park, Heesuk Kim, Paula Colavita, Robert J. Hamers, Paul G. Evans and Padma Gopalan

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800951

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      A layer of functionalized disperse red 19 (DR19) chromophore molecules leads to novel reversible photoelectrical characteristics in organic thin film field effect transistor. Photoassisted poling, along with the change in the dipole of the DR19 under illumination, and photoinduced charge transfer to electron traps in the DR19 layer combine to change the threshold voltage of transistors by up to 100 V.

    3. Nanoparticle Immobilization on Surfaces via Activatable Heterobifunctional Dithiocarbamate Bond Formation (pages 4185–4188)

      Myoung-Hwan Park, Yuval Ofir, Bappaditya Samanta, Palaniappan Arumugam, Oscar R. Miranda and Vincent M. Rotello

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801155

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      A simple and reliable technique has been developed to deposit robust monolayers of different types of nanoparticles including gold, iron-platinum, and core/shell CdSe/ZnS, using in situ dithiocarbamate formation.

    4. Highly Efficient Organic Blue-and White-Light-Emitting Devices Having a Carrier- and Exciton-Confining Structure for Reduced Efficiency Roll-Off (pages 4189–4194)

      Shi-Jian Su, Eisuke Gonmori, Hisahiro Sasabe and Junji Kido

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801375

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly efficient blue and white OLEDs with reduced efficiency roll-off based on a carrier- and exciton-confining structure are developed. Record power efficiencies of 46 and 44 lm W−1 and an external quantum efficiency of 25% at the illumination-relevant luminance of 1000 cd m−2 are achieved for the blue and white OLEDs, respectively, without the use of any outcoupling techniques.

    5. A Materials Approach to the Dual-Site Isolation of Catalysts Bonded to Linear Polymers and Small, Ionic Molecules for Use in One-Pot Cascade Reactions (pages 4195–4199)

      A. Lee Miller II and Ned B. Bowden

      Version of Record online: 29 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801599

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Site isolation of ionic catalysts and polymer-bound catalysts is achieved by placement on different sides of PDMS membranes. Ionic molecules and polymers do not flux through the PDMS membranes, but organic molecules can flux through the membranes and react with catalysts that are incompatible with each other. This is a general approach to site-isolate catalysts from each other.

    6. Preparation of Highly Oriented Nano-Pit Arrays by Thermal Shrinking of Honeycomb-Patterned Polymer Films (pages 4200–4204)

      Hiroshi Yabu, Ruokun Jia, Yasutaka Matsuo, Kuniharu Ijiro, Sada-aki Yamamoto, Fumiaki Nishino, Toshihiko Takaki, Masahiro Kuwahara and Masatsugu Shimomura

      Version of Record online: 9 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801170

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microporous films with various kinds of geometrical patterns including ellipsoids and rectangles are fabricated by using a self-organization process and shrinking. A shrinkable substrate can be used to change the shapes and sizes of honeycomb pores. The pit size can be miniaturized from several micrometers to hundreds of nanometers by repeating the shrinkage.

  13. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    10. Communication
    11. Communications
    12. Communication
    13. Communications
    14. Index

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