Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 20 Issue 22

November 18, 2008

Volume 20, Issue 22

Pages 4211–4366

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review Article
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Cover Picture: Synthesis of Light-Diffracting Assemblies from Microspheres and Nanoparticles in Droplets on a Superhydrophobic Surface (Adv. Mater. 22/2008)

      Vinayak Rastogi, Sonia Melle, Oscar G. Calderón, Antonio A. García, Manuel Marquez and Orlin D. Velev

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890089

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Orlin Velev and co-workers report on page 4263 on the synthesis of light-diffracting assemblies obtained from microspheres and nanoparticles in droplets on a superhydrophobic surface. The cover shows optical microscopy images of drying droplets from aqueous suspensions of monodisperse latex or latex/gold nanoparticle mixtures dispensed on superhydrophobic substrates. Colloidal crystals are formed in the surface layer of the droplets due to the flux of evaporating water. The colloidal crystals give rise to multicolored diffraction patterns upon illumination with collimated white light. Once completely dried, these templates yield structured “nanojewel” supraparticles.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review Article
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Inside Front Cover: Modeling the Optical Response of Highly Faceted Metal Nanoparticles with a Fully 3D Boundary Element Method (Adv. Mater. 22/2008)

      Viktor Myroshnychenko, Enrique Carbó-Argibay, Isabel Pastoriza-Santos, Jorge Pérez-Juste, Luis M. Liz-Marzán and F. Javier García de Abajo

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200890090

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The shape and optical properties of gold nanoparticles can be tailored to yield intriguing reflection and transmission colors. The color of the particles shown on the inside cover results from light scattering, whereas the background of the image corresponds to the color of the light transmitted through a colloidal dispersion. Further details on the modeling of the optical response of metal nanoparticles can be found in the article by Luis Liz-Marzán and co-workers on page 4288.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review Article
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review Article
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Frontiers in Nanoparticle Research: Toward Greater Complexity of Structure and Function of Nanomaterials (pages 4221–4222)

      Nicholas A. Kotov and Francesco Stellacci

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803045

      In this Editorial, our Special Issue Guest Editors Nick Kotov and Francesco Stellacci present a snapshot of the state-of-the-art in research into nanoparticles, and give their views on the outlook and potential development of the fascinating research field.

  5. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review Article
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Applications of Nanoparticles in Biology (pages 4225–4241)

      Mrinmoy De, Partha S. Ghosh and Vincent M. Rotello

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703183

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoparticles provide an excellent platform for a broad range of biological and pharmaceutical applications. This review gives an overview on progress in biological applications of metallic, metal-oxide, semiconductor, and silica nanoparticles in sensing, delivery, and imaging.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review Article
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Thermodynamic Study of the Reactivity of the Two Topological Point Defects Present in Mixed Self-Assembled Monolayers on Gold Nanoparticles (pages 4243–4247)

      Gretchen A. DeVries, Frajovon R. Talley, Randy P. Carney and Francesco Stellacci

      Version of Record online: 5 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702472

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      When a mixed self-assembled monolayer forms on the curved surface of a gold nanoparticle two opposed point defects must form for topological reasons. Here we present a thermodyn amic study proving that these defects are more reactive than other sites on the nanoparticle, and demonstrate that the energy of the react ion depends on the ligand molecules (see figure).

    2. Reversal of Flux Closure States in Cobalt Nanoparticle Rings With Coaxial Magnetic Pulses (pages 4248–4252)

      Takeshi Kasama, Rafal E. Dunin-Borkowski, Michael R. Scheinfein, Steven L. Tripp, Jie Liu and Alexander Wei

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702941

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bistable flux closure (FC) states in Co nanoparticle rings can be switched reversibly by applying a coaxial magnetic field (Hz). The FC switching phenomena can be reproduced by micromagnetics simulations, which also reveal novel magnetic states at intermediate applied field strengths.

    3. Fabrication of Macroscopic Freestanding Films of Metallic Nanoparticle Monolayers by Interfacial Self-Assembly (pages 4253–4256)

      Haibing Xia and Dayang Wang

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702978

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-assembly of gold nanoparticles (NPs) directed by a water/alcohol interface, followed by annealing at 48 °C, leads to macroscopic, dried, freestanding monolayer films as large as several square centimeters (see figure). The approach is free of sacrificial templates and polymer glue layers and independent of the chemical nature of the metal NPs, which means it can easily be generalized to different metal NPs.

    4. Three-Dimensional Self-Assembly of Thiol-Capped CdTe Nanocrystals: Gels and Aerogels as Building Blocks for Nanotechnology (pages 4257–4262)

      Nikolai Gaponik, Andreas Wolf, Romy Marx, Vladimir Lesnyak, Kristian Schilling and Alexander Eychmüller

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702986

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A controllable approach to the formation of 3D networks of strongly light-emitting thiol-capped nanocrystals and their post-preparative treatment, leading to processable and functional materials and composites, is demonstrated. The method shows great potential for application in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

    5. Synthesis of Light-Diffracting Assemblies from Microspheres and Nanoparticles in Droplets on a Superhydrophobic Surface (pages 4263–4268)

      Vinayak Rastogi, Sonia Melle, Oscar G. Calderón, Antonio A. García, Manuel Marquez and Orlin D. Velev

      Version of Record online: 28 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703008

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Aqueous suspension droplets of monodisperse latex or latex and gold nanoparticles mixtures assume spherical shape on superhydrophobic substrates. The drying sessile droplets serve as macroscopic templates for assembling microspheres into closed-packed structures. Upon illumination, the supraparticles display discrete colored rings because of the periodic arrangement of latex particles in the surface layer. The physical origin of the colored patterns is explained in detail.

    6. Two-Dimensional SnS2 Nanoplates with Extraordinary High Discharge Capacity for Lithium Ion Batteries (pages 4269–4273)

      Jung-wook Seo, Jung-tak Jang, Seung-won Park, Chunjoong Kim, Byungwoo Park and Jinwoo Cheon

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703122

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The preparation of 2D layered SnS2 nanoplates with nanoscale lateral confinement (less than 150 nm) is described (see figure). Their unique nanoscale characteristics, including finite lateral 2D morphology, make the discharge capacity of Li ion batteries remarkably high-almost close to the theoretical possible value.

    7. Complete Quenching of CdSe Nanocrystal Photoluminescence by Single Dye Molecules (pages 4274–4280)

      Alison M. Funston, Jacek J. Jasieniak and Paul Mulvaney

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703186

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Quantitative energy transfer from CdSe nanocrystals to a single, conjugated organic dye is observed in the system shown. The energy transfer can be modulated by altering the surface chemistry of the CdSe nanocrystal. The ability of one dye molecule to capture the exciton energy from a semiconductor nanocrystal effectively enhances the absorption cross section of the dye.

    8. Uptake of Colloidal Polyelectrolyte-Coated Particles and Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Capsules by Living Cells (pages 4281–4287)

      Alumdena Muñoz Javier, Oliver Kreft, Maximilian Semmling, Susanne Kempter, Andre G. Skirtach, Oliver T. Bruns, Pablo del Pino, Mathieu F. Bedard, Joachim Rädler, Josef Käs, Christian Plank, Gleb B. Sukhorukov and Wolfgang J. Parak

      Version of Record online: 21 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703190

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rigid particles as well as soft capsules can be ingested by cells and stored in acidic compartments around the nucleus. TEM and fluorescence images show that the rigid particles retain their original spherical shape whereas the hollow and thus more flexible capsules are deformed and squeezed upon the incorporation process. Though soft capsules are deformed upon uptake, the cargo loaded into the capsules is not released into the cytosol.

    9. Modeling the Optical Response of Highly Faceted Metal Nanoparticles with a Fully 3D Boundary Element Method (pages 4288–4293)

      Viktor Myroshnychenko, Enrique Carbó-Argibay, Isabel Pastoriza-Santos, Jorge Pérez-Juste, Luis M. Liz-Marzán and F. Javier García de Abajo

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703214

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel 3D boundary element method that proves extremely efficient for modeling the optical response of metal nanoparticles with arbitrary shapes is presented. The method is computationally more efficient than other methods currently used, and should therefore be of interest for modeling of complex nanostructures.

    10. Chains of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles (pages 4294–4299)

      Kazuya Nakata, Ying Hu, Oktay Uzun, Osman Bakr and Francesco Stellacci

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800022

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Molecularly linked γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles chains are produced from superparamagnetic γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles under zero applied magnetic field. The chains exhibit ferromagnetic interaction between γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles that compose them as evidenced by an increase in blocking temperature from ∼80 K in the case of isolated nanoparticles to ∼120 K for chains.

    11. Plasmon Coupling in Dimers of Au Nanorods (pages 4300–4305)

      Padmanabhan Pramod and K. George Thomas

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703057

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The coupled plasmon absorption of Au nanorod dimers is investigated as a function of the orientation between the long-axes of the nanorod by linking them with rigid and flexible molecules. As the angle between the Au nanorods increases, the coupled plasmon band shifts to longer wavelength confirming the role of effective dipolar overlap.

    12. Photodeposition of Pt on Colloidal CdS and CdSe/CdS Semiconductor Nanostructures (pages 4306–4311)

      Gordana Dukovic, Maxwell G. Merkle, James H. Nelson, Steven M. Hughes and A. Paul Alivisatos

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800384

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pt nanoparticles are deposited photochemically on the surfaces of colloidal CdS nanorods and CdSe/CdS nanoheterostructures. While Pt deposits at varying positions along CdS nanorods, the deposition on CdSe/CdS occurs preferentially near the CdSe core.

    13. Growth of Photocatalytic CdSe–Pt Nanorods and Nanonets (pages 4312–4317)

      Einat Elmalem, Aaron E. Saunders, Ronny Costi, Asaf Salant and Uri Banin

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800044

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A hybrid Pt-CdSe nanoparticle system is prepared in aqueous media, displaying rod or nanonet structures depending on the pH. The new hybrids display morphology-dependent photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation. Separation between photo-generated charge carriers occurs at the metal/semiconductor interface (see figure), allowing redox reactions to take place at the nanoparticle surface.

    14. Evolution of Self-Assembled Structures of Polymer-Terminated Gold Nanorods in Selective Solvents (pages 4318–4322)

      Daniele Fava, Zhihong Nie, Mitchell A. Winnik and Eugenia Kumacheva

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702786

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The evolution of self-assembled structures of polymer-terminated gold nanorods in ternary solvent mixtures is governed by the competition of the side-by-side and end-to-end association modes of the nanorods. This competition arises from the different solubilities of the blocks in the solvent mixture. The effects of solvent composition and water content are also described and explained.

    15. You have free access to this content
      Gold/Iron Oxide Core/Hollow-Shell Nanoparticles (pages 4323–4329)

      Elena V. Shevchenko, Maryna I. Bodnarchuk, Maksym V. Kovalenko, Dmitri V. Talapin, Rachel K. Smith, Shaul Aloni, Wolfgang Heiss and A. Paul Alivisatos

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702994

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gold/iron oxide core/hollow-shell composite nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable shell thicknesses are synthesized (see figure). The gap between the Au core and iron oxide shell is formed as a result of different outward and inward diffusion rates of Fe and O, respectively. Control over interparticle interactions allows encapsulation of several Au cores inside one iron oxide shell. Superparamagnetic measurements of the NPs at room temperature demonstrate the plasmon resonance at 565 nm.

    16. Enhanced Optical Properties of a Photosynthetic System Conjugated with Semiconductor Nanoparticles: The Role of Förster Transfer (pages 4330–4335)

      Alexander O. Govorov

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702999

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The rate of optical generation of electron--hole pairs inside a photosynthetic system can be greatly increased through conjugation with nanoparticles. The enhancement stems from much larger optical absorption cross section of a semiconductor nanoparticle compared to a photosynthetic system. In the hybrid complex, excitons are transferred via the Förster mechanism to the photosynthetic system, where charge separation takes place.

    17. Motif Transfer: Down to 3 nm in Resolution Using Individual Nanocrystals (pages 4336–4341)

      Dorothée Ingert and Marie Paule Pileni

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703000

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Graphite and silicon nanoneedles are fabricated by different etching processes on HOPG and SiOχ. The masks used to engrave such substrates are needle-shaped ferrite nanocrystals. We demonstrate that nanocrystals achieve the role of colloidal masks leading to resolutions down to 10 nm in distance between objects when the etched substrate is SiOχ and less than 3 nm when it is HOPG.

    18. Core/Shell Nanoparticles as Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cell Reactions (pages 4342–4347)

      Jin Luo, Lingyan Wang, Derrick Mott, Peter N. Njoki, Yan Lin, Ting He, Zhichuan Xu, Bridgid N. Wanjana, I.-Im S. Lim and Chuan-Jian Zhong

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703009

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoscale catalysis depends on spatial and surface arrangements of atoms. The synthesis of core/shell nanoparticles by synthetic approaches, the characterization of the core/shell nanostructures in terms of the relative core/shell compositions, and the demonstration of the electrocatalytic activities for fuel cell reactions (see figure), as reported in this Communication, have important implications to the design of desired nanoscale catalysts.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Core/Shell Nanoparticles as Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cell Reaction

      Vol. 20, Issue 24, Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2008

    19. Multivalent, Saccharide-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles as Fully Synthetic Analogs of Type A Neisseria meningitidis Antigens (pages 4348–4352)

      Flavio Manea, Cristiano Bindoli, Silvia Fallarini, Grazia Lombardi, Laura Polito, Luigi Lay, Renato Bonomi, Fabrizio Mancin and Paolo Scrimin

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800737

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Antigen analogs of polyclonal antibodies specific for type A Neisseria mengitidis are prepared by covering gold clusters (2–5 nm in size) with a monolayer of saccharides that have the structure of the repeating unit of the capsular polysaccharide of this bacterium. These systems may find use as synthetic antigens for immunostimulation.

  7. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review Article
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Nanoscale Ionic Materials (pages 4353–4358)

      Robert Rodriguez, Rafael Herrera, Lynden A. Archer and Emmanuel P. Giannelis

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801975

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMS) are organic-inorganic hybrid particles comprising a charged oligomer corona tethered to hard inorganic nanoparticles. The figure shows that through an appropriate choice of nanoparticle core concentration, we are able to produce systems that span the spectrum from glassy solids to simple, solvent-free, nanoparticle ionic fluids.

    2. Enzyme-Responsive Nanoparticle Systems (pages 4359–4363)

      James E. Ghadiali and Molly M. Stevens

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200703158

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      There are a growing number of examples where the optical properties of nanoparticles are being harnessed to develop non-fluorometric and radioisotope-free enzyme assays of high-sensitivity. Here, we provide an overview of the diverse and novel approaches currently being explored to determine the activity of several important enzymes.

  8. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review Article
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION