Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 14‐15

April 20, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 14-15

Pages 1395–1530

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Review Articles
    9. Progress Reports
    10. Communication
    11. Research News
    12. Index
    1. Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: The Role of Processing in the Fabrication and Optimization of Plastic Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 14–15/2009)

      Jeffrey Peet, Michelle L. Senatore, Alan J. Heeger and Guillermo C. Bazan

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990046

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Alan Heeger and co-workers report on page 1521 on the role of processing methodology in the fabrication and optimization of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) ‘plastic’ solar cells. Several techniques that have recently been used to optimize the BHJ nanomorphology are discussed and compared and some insights are given into the mechanisms behind these various techniques. The cover image depicts a multilayer solar cell ribbon along with the polymer, fullerene, and solvent additive, which were used to fabricate a low bandgap polymer solar cell with greater than 5% power conversion efficiency.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Review Articles
    9. Progress Reports
    10. Communication
    11. Research News
    12. Index
    1. 1D Conducting Polymer Nanostructures: One-Dimensional Conducting Polymer Nanostructures: Bulk Synthesis and Applications (Adv. Mater. 14–15/2009)

      Henry D. Tran, Dan Li and Richard B. Kaner

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990047

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      One-dimensional conducting polymer nanostructures hold great promise for many technological applications and can be chemically synthesized in bulk quantities using either template or template-free strategies. Richard Kaner and co-workers highlight on page 1487 recent research activities in this field and present their perspectives on the main challenges and future research directions for this new class of nanomaterials.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Review Articles
    9. Progress Reports
    10. Communication
    11. Research News
    12. Index
  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Review Articles
    9. Progress Reports
    10. Communication
    11. Research News
    12. Index
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      Organic Electronics: From Materials to Devices (pages 1401–1403)

      Yang Yang and Fred Wudl

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900844

  5. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Review Articles
    9. Progress Reports
    10. Communication
    11. Research News
    12. Index
    1. Self-Assembly: Molecular Self-Assembled Monolayers and Multilayers for Organic and Unconventional Inorganic Thin-Film Transistor Applications (Adv. Mater. 14–15/2009)

      Sara A. DiBenedetto, Antonio Facchetti, Mark A. Ratner and Tobin J. Marks

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990049

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of azo stillbazolium sandwiched between two conductive electrodes is shown. The upper and lower electrodes are doped silicon and a Hg drop, respectively, a configuration often used for measuring the conductivity of SAMs and multilayers of hybrid organic and inorganic materials. The evaluation and implementation of these unconventional materials in complex device architectures is highlighted in the review on page 1407 by Sara DiBenedetto et al.

  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Review Articles
    9. Progress Reports
    10. Communication
    11. Research News
    12. Index
    1. Molecular Self-Assembled Monolayers and Multilayers for Organic and Unconventional Inorganic Thin-Film Transistor Applications (pages 1407–1433)

      Sara A. DiBenedetto, Antonio Facchetti, Mark A. Ratner and Tobin J. Marks

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803267

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The progress of self-assembled monolayers (SAM) and nanodielectrics in improving organic and inorganic TFT performance is described in this paper. The fundamentals of SAM fabrication, and their electrical properties in basic two terminal devices (see figure) has enabled rapid progress in the fabrication of low voltage organic and inorganic TFTs, logic circuits, and ultra thin SAM-based TFTs

  7. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Review Articles
    9. Progress Reports
    10. Communication
    11. Research News
    12. Index
    1. Recent Progress in Polymer Solar Cells: Manipulation of Polymer:Fullerene Morphology and the Formation of Efficient Inverted Polymer Solar Cells (pages 1434–1449)

      Li-Min Chen, Ziruo Hong, Gang Li and Yang Yang

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802854

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      Recent advances in controlling the polymer morphology to improve device performance are reviewed in selected polymer-blend systems, with the origin of the vertical phase separation addressed. The current status of inverted polymer solar cells is reviewed, including its advantage of utilizing the spontaneous vertical phase separation. Comparable efficiency to the conventional device structure renders the inverted configuration a promising alternative.

    2. Energy-Level Alignment at Organic/Metal and Organic/Organic Interfaces (pages 1450–1472)

      Slawomir Braun, William R. Salaneck and Mats Fahlman

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802893

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent developments on modeling of organic/metal and organic/organic interfaces are summarized in this Review. The models are categorized according to the types of interfaces they apply to, and the strength of the interaction at the interface is used as the main factor. We explain the basics of the models, their use, and give examples on how they correlate with experiments.

    3. High-Performance Organic Field-Effect Transistors (pages 1473–1486)

      Daniele Braga and Gilles Horowitz

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802733

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      Single-crystal organic field-effect transistors currently offer mobility values in excess of 10 cm2 V−1 s−1. This review gives an overview of the state-of-the-art of these high performance organic transistors. In particular, it deals with the issues of parameter extraction, and limitations of performance by interfaces, including the dielectric/semiconductor interface and injection and retrieval of charge carriers at the source and drain electrodes. Another aspect of high-performance devices is deriving tools to investigate charge transport phenomena in organic materials. Combining field-effect measurements with other electrical characterizations helps elucidate this unresolved issue.

  8. Progress Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Review Articles
    9. Progress Reports
    10. Communication
    11. Research News
    12. Index
    1. One-Dimensional Conducting Polymer Nanostructures: Bulk Synthesis and Applications (pages 1487–1499)

      Henry D. Tran, Dan Li and Richard B. Kaner

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802289

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      One-dimensional conducting polymer nanostructures (see figure), hold great promise for many technological applications and can be chemically synthesized in bulk quantities using either template or template-free strategies. This Progress Report highlights recent research activities in this field and presents our perspectives on the main challenges and future research directions for this new class of nanomaterials.

    2. Magnetic-Field Effects in Organic Semiconducting Materials and Devices (pages 1500–1516)

      Bin Hu, Liang Yan and Ming Shao

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802386

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The singlet and triplet (γS and γT) ratios are function of an applied magnetic field (B) due to spin-dependent pairing and spin mixing in organic semiconducting materials. As a consequence, photoluminescence, electroluminescence, photocurrent, and electrical current are dependent on the magnetic field due to different excited processes and charge transport in singlet and triplet states.

  9. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Review Articles
    9. Progress Reports
    10. Communication
    11. Research News
    12. Index
    1. Organic Photovoltaics Using Tetraphenylbenzoporphyrin Complexes as Donor Layers (pages 1517–1520)

      M. Dolores Perez, Carsten Borek, Peter I. Djurovich, Elizabeth I. Mayo, Richard R. Lunt, Stephen R. Forrest and Mark E. Thompson

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802683

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Small-molecule solar cells are demonstrated using Pt and Pd tetraphenylbenzoporphyrin as donor materials. High efficiencies are achieved, and the effects of triplet excited state diffusion are studied. The solubility of these molecules allows for the fabrication of solution processed solar cells with relatively high performance.

  10. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Review Articles
    9. Progress Reports
    10. Communication
    11. Research News
    12. Index
    1. The Role of Processing in the Fabrication and Optimization of Plastic Solar Cells (pages 1521–1527)

      Jeffrey Peet, Michelle L. Senatore, Alan J. Heeger and Guillermo C. Bazan

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802559

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plastic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells have achieved power-conversion efficiencies in excess of 5%, can be inexpensively printed onto flexible substrates, and efficiencies in excess of 10% should be possible. This Research News article highlights a few of the techniques recently developed to optimize the BHJ nanomorphology of polymer solar cells.

  11. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Review Articles
    9. Progress Reports
    10. Communication
    11. Research News
    12. Index

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