Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 18

May 11, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 18

Pages 1779–1882

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Organic Electronics: Solution-Grown, Macroscopic Organic Single Crystals Exhibiting Three-Dimensional Anisotropic Charge-Transport Properties (Adv. Mater. 18/2009)

      Beatrice Fraboni, Cristina Femoni, Ivan Mencarelli, Leonardo Setti, Riccardo Di Pietro, Anna Cavallini and Alessandro Fraleoni-Morgera

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990061

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic single crystals have the potential to delivering novel electronic devices based on three-dimensional anisotropic electronic transport. The cover shows single crystals of 4-hydroxycyanobenzene (4HCB) grown from solution behind a distorted-perspective partial representation of the crystalline structure hinting at their molecular constituents. The carrier mobility, anisotropic along the three crystallographic axes, is discussed by Fraleoni-Morgera, Fraboni, Femoni, and co-workers on p. 1835. Dr. George Kourousias is acknowledged for the cover design and artwork.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Superhydrophobic Coatings: Bioinspired Degradable Substrates with Extreme Wettability Properties (Adv. Mater. 18/2009)

      Wenlong Song, Diana D. Veiga, Catarina A. Custódio and João F. Mano

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990062

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      João Mano and co-workers have developed new superhydrophobic poly(L-lactic acid) substrates for biomedical applications, reported on p.1830. The wettability of the substrates can be controlled within the superhydrophobic–superhydrophilic range by using argon plasma treatment. The inside cover image shows the texture of such a substrate exhibiting micro-and nanoscale roughness, which gives rise its extreme wettability behavior (the structure in the image can be viewed more clearly using 3D glasses).

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Research News
    9. Index
  4. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Exploiting the Kubas Interaction in the Design of Hydrogen Storage Materials (pages 1787–1800)

      Tuan K. A. Hoang and David M. Antonelli

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802832

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      There is much current interest in Kubas-type hydrogen because it may provide suitable hydrogen binding energies for room temperature storage. This article focuses on both calculations and synthesis of many systems involving the Kubas interaction, including modified carbon materials, metal–acetylene complexes, modified polymers, metal organic frameworks, reduced mesoporous titania, and surface organometallic supported silica.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Dual Tuning of the Photonic Band-Gap Structure in Soft Photonic Crystals (pages 1801–1804)

      Masaki Honda, Takahiro Seki and Yukikazu Takeoka

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801258

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A dually tunable photonic crystal composed of thermosensitive gel particles confined in a pH-sensitive inverse-opal gel is reported. The position of the photonic band-gap can be thermally regulated, while its intensity is dramatically changed by pH. Reversible, independent, and extensive switching of the position and intensity of the photonic band-gap could be achieved using independent external stimuli.

    2. Fabrication of Continuous and Segmented Polymer/Metal Oxide Nanowires Using Cylindrical Micelles and Block Comicelles as Templates (pages 1805–1808)

      Hai Wang, Avinash J. Patil, Kun Liu, Srebri Petrov, Stephen Mann, Mitchell A. Winnik and Ian Manners

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803015

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cylindrical micelles were added as templates to sol–gel reaction mixtures to yield highly elongated polymer/inorganic nanostructures with smooth nanothin surface coatings of silica, zirconia, or alumina. Differences in the templating activity of neutral or cationic coronas can be exploited by using triblock comicelles to produce discrete nanocylinders with spatially isolated domains of titania surface deposition.

    3. Biodegradable Thermoresponsive Microparticle Dispersions for Injectable Cell Delivery Prepared Using a Single-Step Process (pages 1809–1813)

      Wenxin Wang, He Liang, Racha Cheikh Al Ghanami, Lloyd Hamilton, Michael Fraylich, Kevin M. Shakesheff, Brian Saunders and Cameron Alexander

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800382

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Surface-engineered microparticles with a biodegradable polymer core and a programmable thermoresponsive biocompatible copolymer corona are produced. The particles form free-flowing dispersions below 37 °C, but form porous space-filling gels above this temperature, as a result of chain collapse of the copolymer corona. When particles are mixed with biological materials, they form encapsulating gels that can support cell growth.

    4. Emulsion as a Means of Controlling Electrospinning of Polymers (pages 1814–1819)

      Jay C. Sy, Amy S. Klemm and V. Prasad Shastri

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701630

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A generalized approach to attain spinnability in polymer solutions in electrospinning using emulsions is described. By using emulsions, low-molecular weight (MW) polymer solutions that tend to electrospray can be spun into nanofibers. Additionally, control over fiber properties independent of polymer solution viscosity and MW is achieved, with an order of magnitude reduction in fiber diameter upon emulsification. Nanofibrous sheets obtained demonstrate excellent cellular biocompatibility and are suitable for tissue contacting applications.

    5. Degradable, Surfactant-Free, Monodisperse Polymer-Encapsulated Emulsions as Anticancer Drug Carriers (pages 1820–1824)

      Sri Sivakumar, Vipul Bansal, Christina Cortez, Siow-Feng Chong, Alexander N. Zelikin and Frank Caruso

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802475

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Anticancer emulsions: Degradable, surfactant- free, micrometer- to sub-micrometer-sized polymer-encapsulated emulsions loaded with lipophilic drugs (doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil) are prepared. In vitro drug-release studies demonstrate controlled release under redox conditions and incubation with human colorectal cancer cells triggers cell death with greater efficiency (≈106 fold) than the free drug.

    6. Fabrication of Micropatterned Stimulus-Responsive Polymer-Brush ‘Anemone’ (pages 1825–1829)

      Tao Chen, Jianming Zhang, Debby P. Chang, Andres Garcia and Stefan Zauscher

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802484

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple strategy to fabricate stimulus-responsive patterned PNIPAAM-brush microstructures (‘anemones’) is presented. The size of the microstructures can be adjusted by setting the composition of thiol and the contact pressure. We demonstrate that the patterned PNIPAAM-brush microstructures have a triggerable and reversible conformation transition, and can potentially be used as microcontainers to reversibly dock and release microparticles.

    7. Bioinspired Degradable Substrates with Extreme Wettability Properties (pages 1830–1834)

      Wenlong Song, Diana D. Veiga, Catarina A. Custódio and João F. Mano

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803680

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Robust superhydrophobic poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) substrates are prepared using a new phase-separation-based method. The wettability of the surfaces can be controlled in the range from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic using argon-plasma treatment. The figure shows water droplets with different contact angles on differently modified PLLA surfaces superimposed on a SEM image of a rough surface.

    8. Solution-Grown, Macroscopic Organic Single Crystals Exhibiting Three-Dimensional Anisotropic Charge-Transport Properties (pages 1835–1839)

      Beatrice Fraboni, Cristina Femoni, Ivan Mencarelli, Leonardo Setti, Riccardo Di Pietro, Anna Cavallini and Alessandro Fraleoni-Morgera

      Version of Record online: 9 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802904

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Macroscopic single crystals of 4-hydroxy-cyanobenzene (4HCB) grown from solution exhibit reproducible and marked 3D mobility anisotropy. Air-gap OFET measurements along the planar axes a and b deliver average mobilities of 3 × 10−2 and 6 × 10−3 cm2 V−1 s−1, respectively. Space-charge-limited current (SCLC) experiments reveal an average mobility along the c axis of 4 × 10−6 cm2 V−1 s−1.

    9. Low Adhesive Surfaces that Adapt to Changing Environments (pages 1840–1844)

      Roman Sheparovych, Mikhail Motornov and Sergiy Minko

      Version of Record online: 20 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802449

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A responsive/adaptive nonadhesive surface coating that combines hydrophobic particles and hydrophilic polymer chains in a tethered composite coating is demonstrated. Rigid particles provide low contact area, while a selective segregation of polymer chains upon changing the surrounding environment from vapors to liquids and vice versa adapts the low-adhesive property of the composite surface.

    10. Al2O3/ZrO2 Nanolaminates as Ultrahigh Gas-Diffusion Barriers—A Strategy for Reliable Encapsulation of Organic Electronics (pages 1845–1849)

      Jens Meyer, Patrick Görrn, Franz Bertram, Sami Hamwi, Thomas Winkler, Hans-Hermann Johannes, Thomas Weimann, Peter Hinze, Thomas Riedl and Wolfgang Kowalsky

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803440

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly efficient gas-diffusion barriers based on nanolaminates of alternating Al2O3 and ZrO2 layers grown at 80 °C by atomic-layer deposition are presented. Ultralow water-vapor permeation rates are reported, and a dramatic reduction of statistical defects on larger areas was found compared to single Al2O3 layers. This study provides a concept for the encapsulation of organic optoelectronic devices.

    11. Ultrathin Te Nanowires: An Excellent Platform for Controlled Synthesis of Ultrathin Platinum and Palladium Nanowires/Nanotubes with Very High Aspect Ratio (pages 1850–1854)

      Hai-Wei Liang, Shuo Liu, Jun-Yan Gong, Shang-Bing Wang, Lei Wang and Shu-Hong Yu

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802286

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Uniform ultrathin Pt nanotubes, Pt and Pd nanowires with diameters of only several nanometers and a very-high aspect ratio of ∼10 000 can be fabricated using ultrathin Te nanowires as both reducing agent and sacrificial template in ethylene glycol. The valences of metal precursors have a crucial effect on the morphology of the nanostructures.

    12. Characterization of Charge Collection in Photodiodes under Mechanical Strain: Comparison between Organic Bulk Heterojunction and Amorphous Silicon (pages 1855–1859)

      Tse Nga Ng, William S. Wong, Rene A. Lujan and Robert A. Street

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803046

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Both gradual electrical changes and device failure mechanisms caused by mechanical strain in organic photodiodes are investigated and compared to a-Si:H deposited on plastic substrates.

    13. Organic Base Modulation Triodes and Their Inverters on Flexible Substrates (pages 1860–1864)

      Shiau-Shin Cheng, You-Che Chuang, Kekuda Dhananjay, Chun-Wei Ou, Meng-Chyi Wu and Chi-Wei Chu

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802506

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic base modulation triodes (OBMTs) are fabricated using two back-to-back Schottky diodes and deposited on a flexible substrate. With the advantage of the shorter channel, the OBMTs can be operated under lower voltages and faster frequencies. The inverter is fabricated using the OBMT connected with a resistor in series.

  6. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Metal Chalcogenide Clusters: Metal Chalcogenide Clusters on the Border between Molecules and Materials (Adv. Mater. 18/2009)

      John F. Corrigan, Olaf Fuhr and Dieter Fenske

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990064

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoclusters containing up to several hundred transition metal atoms can be understood as intermediates between mononuclear complexes and binary solid-state phases. In contrast to conventional nanoparticles, these species are precisely monodisperse, and therefore their molecular structures can be determined by single crystal X-ray analysis, report Dieter Fenske and co-workers on p. 1867.

  7. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Metal Chalcogenide Clusters on the Border between Molecules and Materials (pages 1867–1871)

      John F. Corrigan, Olaf Fuhr and Dieter Fenske

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802897

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoclusters containing up to several hundred transition metal atoms can be understood as intermediates between mononuclear complexes and binary solid-state phases. In contrast to conventional nanoparticles, these species are precisely monodisperse, and therefore their molecular structures can be determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. The figure shows the packing of the [Ag344S124(StBu)96] clusters in their 3D crystal lattice.

    2. Formation of Network and Cellular Structures by Viscoelastic Phase Separation (pages 1872–1880)

      Hajime Tanaka

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802763

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A physical principle for producing network and cellular structures using viscoelastic phase separation is described. Its potential applications to the morphological control of materials spanning from soft to hard matter is detailed. Network (sponge) and cellular structures are often seen in various types of materials that are generally characterized by light weight and high mechanical strength.

  8. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Research News
    9. Index

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