Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 19

May 18, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 19

Pages 1887–1990

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Three-Dimensional Fabrication by Reaction-Diffusion: “Remote” Fabrication via Three-Dimensional Reaction-Diffusion: Making Complex Core-and-Shell Particles and Assembling Them into Open-Lattice Crystals (Adv. Mater. 19/2009)

      Paul J. Wesson, Siowling Soh, Rafal Klajn, Kyle J. M. Bishop, Timothy P. Gray and Bartosz A. Grzybowski

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990066

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reaction-diffusion processes initiated from the surfaces of small gel or polymer particles can fabricate complex three-dimensional structures inside these particles. Bartosz Grzybowski and co-workers show on page 1911 that the core/shell particles thus prepared can be further modified “remotely” by electrochemical exchange reactions. The image shows four cubical particles, each having a spherical core fabricated by reaction-diffusion and comprising copper nanoparticles.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Imaging and Spectroscopy of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes during Oxidation: Defects and Oxygen Bonding (Adv. Mater. 19/2009)

      Alexei Barinov, Luca Gregoratti, Pavel Dudin, Salvatore La Rosa and Maya Kiskinova

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990067

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Photoelectron spectromicroscopy studies revealed the morphology changes and the abundance of various oxygenated functional groups on individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes exposed to oxidizing environments. Alexei Barinov and co-workers show on page 1916 that carbonyl type bonding configurations prevail when fragmentation and extinction of the nanotubes occur.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
  4. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Materials Fabricated by Micro- and Nanoparticle Assembly – The Challenging Path from Science to Engineering (pages 1897–1905)

      Orlin D. Velev and Shalini Gupta

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801837

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Colloidal assemblies can be fabricated in a variety of structures, shapes and forms through a variety of physical processes that are still under extensive development. We survey the strategies for producing particle structures of different degrees of ordering and dimensionality, and the limitations and challenges in the practical fabrication of such assemblies.

  5. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. DNA Hybrid Nanomachines: Fullerene Attachment Enhances Performance of a DNA Nanomachine (Adv. Mater. 19/2009)

      Su Ryon Shin, Kyeong Sik Jin, Chang Kee Lee, Sun I. Kim, Geoffrey M. Spinks, Insuk So, Ju-Hong Jeon, Tong Mook Kang, Ji Young Mun, Sung-Sik Han, Moonhor Ree and Seon Jeong Kim

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990069

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The image shows the developing biocompatible molecules with controllable, accurate, and reproducible molecular motor functions for mobile nanodevices. Seon Jeong Kim and co-workers show on page 1907 that the attachment of fullerene moieties to a single-strand DNA significantly improves the molecular switching and stability of this pH driven enthalpic molecular machine. Hydrophobic interactions between the terminal fullerenes in the folded i-motif conformation increased the machines power stroke and force generated.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Fullerene Attachment Enhances Performance of a DNA Nanomachine (pages 1907–1910)

      Su Ryon Shin, Kyeong Sik Jin, Chang Kee Lee, Sun I. Kim, Geoffrey M. Spinks, Insuk So, Ju-Hong Jeon, Tong Mook Kang, Ji Young Mun, Sung-Sik Han, Moonhor Ree and Seon Jeong Kim

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803429

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fullerene moieties are attached to single-strand DNA and the pH-induced conformational changes are evaluated in detail. It is found that fullerene attachments significantly enhance the machine performance of the DNA strand by stabilization of internal structure through intramolecular hydrophobic interactions.

    2. “Remote” Fabrication via Three-Dimensional Reaction-Diffusion: Making Complex Core-and-Shell Particles and Assembling Them into Open-Lattice Crystals (pages 1911–1915)

      Paul J. Wesson, Siowling Soh, Rafal Klajn, Kyle J. M. Bishop, Timothy P. Gray and Bartosz A. Grzybowski

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802964

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reaction-diffusion (RD) processes initiated from the surfaces of mesoscopic particles can fabricate complex core-and-shell structures. The propagation of a sharp RD front selectively removes metal colloids or nanoparticles from the supporting gel or polymer matrix. Once fabricated, the core structures can be processed “remotely” via galvanic replacement reactions, and the composite particles can be assembled into open-lattice crystals.

    3. Imaging and Spectroscopy of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes during Oxidation: Defects and Oxygen Bonding (pages 1916–1920)

      Alexei Barinov, Luca Gregoratti, Pavel Dudin, Salvatore La Rosa and Maya Kiskinova

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803003

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The gasification process, which increases the number of broken C[BOND]C bonds and the abundance of particular oxygenated functional groups, is shown to destroy carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The expansion of the defect density and dimensions leads to nonlinear consumption of the CNTs with increasing O dose. Some nanotubes are consumed faster than others, most probably due to higher defect densities.

    4. Hierarchically Ordered Topographic Patterns via Plasmonic Mask Photolithography (pages 1921–1926)

      Woo Soo Kim, Lin Jia and Edwin L. Thomas

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802434

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By employing a block copolymer to spatially organize silver nanoparticles, laser light can be concentrated via plasmon resonance to locally expose a photoresist. By subsequent development, this plasmonic lithography can provide deep subwavelength scale features.

    5. Magnetic-Field-Induced Locomotion of Glass Fibers on Water Surfaces: Towards the Understanding of How Much Force One Magnetic Nanoparticle Can Deliver (pages 1927–1930)

      Feng Shi, Shuhua Liu, Haitao Gao, Ning Ding, Lijie Dong, Wolfgang Tremel and Wolfgang Knoll

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801346

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The amount of force one magnetic nanoparticle (MNPs) can deliver is calculated using Fe3O4 MNPs building blocks to modify glass fibers. Our results demonstrate that one weight unit of Fe3O4 MNPs can eventually drag ≈10 000 times its own weight on a water surface, a significant finding for the development of new magnetic delivery systems and micromanipulators.

    6. Colloidal Route for Preparing Optical Thin Films of Nanoporous Metal–Organic Frameworks (pages 1931–1935)

      Patricia Horcajada, Christian Serre, David Grosso, Cedric Boissière, Sandrine Perruchas, Clément Sanchez and Gérard Férey

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801851

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Colloids of a highly flexible porous metal-organic framework (MOF) have been prepared using nontoxic and easily removable solvents. Furthermore, a simple dip-coating method for the preparation of optical-quality thin films of the MOF has been developed. The homogeneous thin film exhibits reversible flexibility, as has been proven by environmental ellipsometry.

    7. Fabrication of 3D Photonic Crystals of Ellipsoids: Convective Self-Assembly in Magnetic Field (pages 1936–1940)

      Tao Ding, Kai Song, Koen Clays and Chen-Ho Tung

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803564

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three-dimensional photonic crystals of ellipsoidal colloidal particles are prepared by direct convective self-assembly from suspension with the aid of a magnet. The magnetic field provides the orientational order, which is additionally needed for these colloidal particles with symmetry lower than spherical. The positional order is provided by the convection, just as for spherical colloids.

    8. Extended Lifetime of Organic Field-Effect Transistors Encapsulated with Titanium Sub-Oxide as an ‘Active’ Passivation/Barrier Layer (pages 1941–1944)

      Shinuk Cho, Kwanghee Lee and Alan J. Heeger

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A thin capping layer of titanium sub-oxide (TiOx) prepared by sol–gel synthesis from titanium alkoxides extends the lifetime of organic FETs. The TiOx layer functions as an ‘active’ passivation/barrier layer that actually removes oxygen and water vapor from the organic semiconductor. The results demonstrate a significant improvement in the lifetime of organic field-effect transistors when exposed to air.

    9. Dual-Mode Luminescent Colloidal Spheres from Monodisperse Rare-Earth Fluoride Nanocrystals (pages 1945–1948)

      Peng Li, Qing Peng and Yadong Li

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803228

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Monodisperse rare-earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized and used as building blocks to fabricate dual-mode luminescent colloidal spheres, which are composed of two distinct units, one offering down-converting luminescence under UV excitation and the other providing up-converting luminescent emission when excited with a 980 nm laser, and have potential applications in multiplexed and highly sensitive bioassays.

    10. Janus Supraparticles by Induced Phase Separation of Nanoparticles in Droplets (pages 1949–1953)

      Rhutesh K. Shah, Jin-Woong Kim and David A. Weitz

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803115

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biphasic Janus particles with a precisely tunable internal morphology are fabricated using a novel, versatile, and robust technique. This technique can be used in conjunction with microfluidics to produce monodisperse particles, or can be combined with bulk emulsification techniques to produce large quantities of particles.

    11. Multibit Storage of Organic Thin-Film Field-Effect Transistors (pages 1954–1959)

      Yunlong Guo, Chong-an Di, Shanghui Ye, Xiangnan Sun, Jian Zheng, Yugeng Wen, Weiping Wu, Gui Yu and Yunqi Liu

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802430

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic thin-film field-effect transistor (OTFT) multibit storage devices are fabricated based on pentacene or copper phthalocyaine (CuPc) with normal polymer modifying layers of polystyrene (PS) or polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The devices shows excellent multibit storage properties in a single OTFT using electric and light-assisted programs.

    12. Mineral-Coated Polymer Microspheres for Controlled Protein Binding and Release (pages 1960–1963)

      Leenaporn Jongpaiboonkit, Travelle Franklin-Ford and William L. Murphy

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801808

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymer microspheres with a bone-like mineral coatings are generated via a biomimetic process, and this biodegradable coating is used as a carrier for delivery of biological molecules. Acidic and basic proteins are controllably bound and released from these microspheres, suggesting that this approach can be used for binding and delivery of a broad range of biologically active molecules.

    13. A Novel Protocol Toward Perfect Alignment of Anodized TiO2 Nanotubes (pages 1964–1967)

      Daoai Wang, Bo Yu, Chengwei Wang, Feng Zhou and Weimin Liu

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801996

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Perfectly aligned high-aspect-ratio TiO2 nanotubes that are perpendicularly oriented to a substrate are obtained using a two-step anodization process in ethylene glycol containing 0.5 wt% NH4F and 1 vol% HF, overcoming the bundling issue of TiO2 NTs commonly observed in conventional approaches. They are then used as a template for the electrodeposition of Pt nanowires.

    14. Simple Fabrication of Antibody Microarrays on Nonfouling Polymer Brushes with Femtomolar Sensitivity for Protein Analytes in Serum and Blood (pages 1968–1971)

      Angus Hucknall, Dong-Hwan Kim, Srinath Rangarajan, Ryan T. Hill, William M. Reichert and Ashutosh Chilkoti

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803125

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A multianalyte antibody array that is spotted on a poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) brush 100 nm thick, grown on glass via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization, has femtomolar limit-of-detection (LOD) of cytokines in serum and whole blood, and a dynamic range of six orders of magnitude for a range of protein analytes.

    15. Long-Lifetime Polymer Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells Fabricated with Crosslinked Hole-Transport Layers (pages 1972–1975)

      Yan Shao, Xiong Gong, Alan J. Heeger, Michelle Liu and Alex K.-Y. Jen

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803698

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By inserting a crosslinkable hole-transport layer as the buffer layer between the single-phase polymer active layer and the anode of this new type of polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (PLECs), the interface properties are improved and the PLECs can be operated with enhanced stability.

    16. Supramolecular Self-Assembled Dendritic Nonlinear Optical Chromophores: Fine-Tuning of Arene–Perfluoroarene Interactions for Ultralarge Electro-Optic Activity and Enhanced Thermal Stability (pages 1976–1981)

      Xing-Hua Zhou, Jingdong Luo, Su Huang, Tae-Dong Kim, Zhengwei Shi, Yen-Ju Cheng, Sei-Hum Jang, Daniel B. Knorr Jr., René M. Overney and Alex K.-Y. Jen

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801639

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Unprecedented electro-optic (EO) activity and excellent alignment stability at 85 °C are demonstrated through rational design of a new series of dendronized polyenic chromophores capable of supramolecular self-assembly directed by fine-tuned arene–perfluoroarene interactions. Analysis of the EO properties showed exceptional poling efficiency for these molecular glasses at high chromophore number density.

  7. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Electrocaloric Materials for Solid-State Refrigeration (pages 1983–1987)

      Sheng-Guo Lu and Qiming Zhang

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802902

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Applying an electrical field to a dielectric may induce a large entropy and temperature change which is attractive for solid-state cooling. We present the general considerations and review the experimental efforts to achieve large electrocaloric effect (ECE) in dielectrics. We show that by operating above the order-disorder transitions, a large ECE can be achieved in a ferroelectric polymer.

  8. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index

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