Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 20

May 25, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 20

Pages 1997–2118

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    11. Index
    1. Organic Semiconductors: Relating the Functional Properties of an Organic Semiconductor to Molecular Structure by nc-AFM (Adv. Mater. 20/2009)

      Sarah A. Burke, Jeffrey M. LeDue, Jessica M. Topple, Shawn Fostner and Peter Grütter

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The influence of the molecular scale arrangement on the optoelectronic properties of organic semiconductors can be investigated using noncontact AFM to determine the local structure of molecular islands and probe the local optical excitation response of different molecular-scale structures, report Peter Grutter and co-workers on p. 2029. The cover image shows a 3D rendering of a high-resolution noncontact AFM image of a monolayer of PTCDA molecules trapped in a nanoscale pit in NaCl, one of the structures investigated, under “illumination”.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    11. Index
    1. UV Photodetectors: Single-Crystalline ZnS Nanobelts as Ultraviolet-Light Sensors (Adv. Mater. 20/2009)

      Xiaosheng Fang, Yoshio Bando, Meiyong Liao, Ujjal K. Gautam, Chunyi Zhi, Benjamin Dierre, Baodan Liu, Tianyou Zhai, Takashi Sekiguchi, Yasuo Koide and Dmitri Golberg

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990072

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Xiaosheng Fang and and co-workers demonstrate on p. 2034 that single-crystalline ZnS nanobelts that display sharp UV emission (∼ 337 nm) at room temperature can be assembled into UV sensors that are highly selective and display ultrafast response to radiation stimuli. Such sensors would prove extremely useful for the detection of harmful near-visible-wavelength UV radiation, of particular interest in locations where the shielding effect of the Earth's atmosphere is deteriorating.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    11. Index
  4. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    11. Index
    1. Thin-Film Transistors (pages 2007–2022)

      Robert A. Street

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803211

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      Thin-film transistor (TFT) technology progresses rapidly, but the scaling size of manufacturing (see figure) cannot continue indefinitely. There is an intense search for new materials to improve performance, lower manufacturing cost, and enable new functionality. Organic semiconductors, metal oxides, nanowires, and printing technology are some of the options, but each still has technical problems.

  5. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    11. Index
    1. Coordination Polymers: Organization of Coordination Polymers on Surfaces by Direct Sublimation (Adv. Mater. 20/2009)

      Lorena Welte, Urko García-Couceiro, Oscar Castillo, David Olea, Celia Polop, Alejandro Guijarro, Antonio Luque, José M. Gómez-Rodríguez, Julio Gómez-Herrero and Félix Zamora

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990074

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sublimation and surface reassembly of coordination polymers is introduced by Felix Zamora and co-workers on page 2025. This striking phenomenon is achieved due to the reversibility of the coordination bonds, which allows the polymers to be sublimated in form of small oligomers and reassembled on the surface. Temperature-controlled transition to a 1D organization reflecting the 1D bulk structure of the coordination compound is observed by atomic force microscopy.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    11. Index
    1. Organization of Coordination Polymers on Surfaces by Direct Sublimation (pages 2025–2028)

      Lorena Welte, Urko García-Couceiro, Oscar Castillo, David Olea, Celia Polop, Alejandro Guijarro, Antonio Luque, José M. Gómez-Rodríguez, Julio Gómez-Herrero and Félix Zamora

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802886

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sublimation and surface reassembly of coordination polymers is achieved due to the reversibility of the coordination bonds. Atomic force microscopy images show linear structures on surfaces, as expected for a 1D coordination polymer

    2. Relating the Functional Properties of an Organic Semiconductor to Molecular Structure by nc-AFM (pages 2029–2033)

      Sarah A. Burke, Jeffrey M. LeDue, Jessica M. Topple, Shawn Fostner and Peter Grütter

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802947

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The structure and properties of different molecular scale PTCDA arrangements are investigated by noncontact-AFM. A hybrid optical–electrostatic characterization is used to locally probe freely grown and nanoconfined structures in order to connect opto-electronic properties with the molecular scale structure determined by high resolution AFM.

    3. Single-Crystalline ZnS Nanobelts as Ultraviolet-Light Sensors (pages 2034–2039)

      Xiaosheng Fang, Yoshio Bando, Meiyong Liao, Ujjal K. Gautam, Chunyi Zhi, Benjamin Dierre, Baodan Liu, Tianyou Zhai, Takashi Sekiguchi, Yasuo Koide and Dmitri Golberg

      Version of Record online: 26 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802441

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Single-crystalline ZnS nanobelts with sharp ultraviolet-light emission (∼337 nm) at room temperature have been assembled as UV Sensors. The high spectral selectivity, combined with high photosensitivity and fast response time, justifies the effective utilization of the present ZnS nanobelts as “visible-light-blind” UV photodetectors in different areas.

    4. Precisely Defined Heterogeneous Conducting Polymer Nanowire Arrays – Fabrication and Chemical Sensing Applications (pages 2040–2044)

      Yixuan Chen and Yi Luo

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803292

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Heterogeneous conducting polymer nanostructures are fabricated using a newly developed method. Completely isolated nanowires of several conducting polymer materials can be fabricated side-by-side with perfect registry to each other on a rigid or flexible substrate. Results of a chemical sensing study using PPY and PEDOT nanowires are presented (see figure).

    5. Electric-Field-Tunable Low Loss Multiferroic Ferrimagnetic–Ferroelectric Heterostructures (pages 2045–2049)

      Jaydip Das, Young-Yeal Song, Nan Mo, Pavol Krivosik and Carl E. Patton

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803376

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel monolithic multilayered ferrimagnetic– ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructure shows a remarkably large tuning of the magnetic response with an electric field. The heteroepitaxial stack is comprised of a near single crystal yttrium iron garnet (YIG) layer, a ferroelectric barium strontium titanate (BSTO) layer with good electric field tunability, and embedded platinum (Pt) electrodes.

    6. Wide Blue Phase Range in a Hydrogen-Bonded Self-Assembled Complex of Chiral Fluoro-Substituted Benzoic Acid and Pyridine Derivative (pages 2050–2053)

      Wanli He, Guohui Pan, Zhou Yang, Dongyu Zhao, Guoguang Niu, Wei Huang, Xiaotao Yuan, Jinbao Guo, Hui Cao and Huai Yang

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802927

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A blue phase with a broad temperature range of about 23.0 °C is easily achieved in a hydrogen-bonded self-assembled complex of chiral fluoro-substituted benzoic acid and pyridine derivative. The success in extending the temperature of blue phase indicates that the hydrogen-bonded self-assembly is a promising new approach to broaden the temperature range of blue phases and to investigate the mystery of blue phases.

    7. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Electrical Brush Contacts (pages 2054–2058)

      Geza Toth, Jani Mäklin, Niina Halonen, Jaakko Palosaari, Jari Juuti, Heli Jantunen, Krisztian Kordas, W. Gregory Sawyer, Robert Vajtai and Pulickel M. Ajayan

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802200

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electrical properties of brush contacts made of bulk carbon nanotube forest are significantly better than the presently used commercial products due to the unique and intimate surface interaction of the former on the nanoscale. The image displays the nanotube block used, the measurement setup, and the resistance fluctuations for the carbon nanotube and the conventional brush setups.

    8. RGB Emission through Controlled Donor Self-Assembly and Modulation of Excitation Energy Transfer: A Novel Strategy to White-Light-Emitting Organogels (pages 2059–2063)

      Chakkooth Vijayakumar, Vakayil K. Praveen and Ayyappanpillai Ajayaghosh

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802932

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A white-light-emitting organogel is designed by the controlled self-assembly of a bischolesterol-functionalized OPV donor that allows slow energy migration and partial energy transfer in the gel state to an encapsulated acceptor. The white-light emission occurs because of the combination of blue-light emission from the OPV monomers, green-light emission from the OPV self-assembly, and red-light emission from the acceptor.

    9. Fabrication of Freestanding Nanoporous Polyethersulfone Membranes Using Organometallic Polymer Resists Patterned by Nanosphere Lithography (pages 2064–2067)

      Canet Acikgoz, Xing Yi Ling, In Yee Phang, Mark A. Hempenius, David N. Reinhoudt, Jurriaan Huskens and G. Julius Vancso

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803647

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Freestanding nanoporous polysulfone membranes are fabricated using nanosphere lithography, in which colloidal silica particles act as a template for the organometallic etch resist, which is composed of poly(ferrocenylsilanes). As shown in the figure, the membranes are robust enough to be removed from the silica wafers where they were produced. They can subsequently be used to separate particles of different sizes.

  7. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    11. Index
    1. Nonclassical Crystallization: Facile Synthesis and Shape Evolution of Single-Crystal Cuprous Oxide (Adv. Mater. 20/2009)

      Xudong Liang, Lian Gao, Songwang Yang and Jing Sun

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990076

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lian Gao and co-workers discuss on p. 2068 the synergic effect of oriented attachment and ripening mechanism with face-selective additive adsorption for the formation of various morphologies of single-crystal Cu2O. The frontispiece shows an SEM image of self-assembled microcubic Cu2O mesocrystals, clearly revealing the rarely observed combination of a nonclassical-particle-based crystallization process and subsequent classical crystallization process.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    11. Index
    1. Facile Synthesis and Shape Evolution of Single-Crystal Cuprous Oxide (pages 2068–2071)

      Xudong Liang, Lian Gao, Songwang Yang and Jing Sun

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802783

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Various morphologies of single-crystal Cu2O such as cube, octahedron, {110} truncated octahedron, and microrhombic dodecahedron with {110} surfaces are prepared in high yield through a facile solution-based one-step reduction method in an alkaline H2O/ethanol/oleic acid system in the presence of d-(+)-glucose. The formation mechanism of these microcrystals has been clarified as the synergic effect of oriented attachment and ripening mechanism.

    2. Wafer-Level Patterned and Aligned Polymer Nanowire/Micro- and Nanotube Arrays on any Substrate (pages 2072–2076)

      Jenny Ruth Morber, Xudong Wang, Jin Liu, Robert L. Snyder and Zhong Lin Wang

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803648

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel technique for fabrication of patterned and aligned polymer-nanowire/micro-and nanotube (PNW/PNT) arrays on a wafer-level substrate of any material is reported. By creating a designed pattern on a spin-coated polymer film using techniques, such as stamping or micro-tip writing, plasma etching results in the formation of aligned PNW arrays distributed according to the pattern.

    3. Advanced Calcium Copper Titanate/Polyimide Functional Hybrid Films with High Dielectric Permittivity (pages 2077–2082)

      Zhi-Min Dang, Tao Zhou, Sheng-Hong Yao, Jin-Kai Yuan, Jun-Wei Zha, Hong-Tao Song, Jian-Ying Li, Qiang Chen, Wan-Tai Yang and Jinbo Bai

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803427

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A functional hybrid film with high dielectric permittivity and good thermal stability is obtained using calcium copper titanate as filler in a polyimide polymer matrix. The giant dielectric permittivity of the filler and its semiconducting characteristics impart good dielectric properties to the hybrid films. A dielectric permittivity high as 49 is achieved at a 40 vol% filler concentration at 102 Hz.

    4. Nanopatterning via Pressure-Induced Instabilities in Thin Polymer Films (pages 2083–2087)

      Ximin He, Jurjen Winkel and Wilhelm T. S. Huck

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803547

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The residual stresses in spin-coated films can be exploited to produce highly controlled nanoscale patterns via pressure-induced local rupturing and dewetting of thin films. Residue-free holes as small as 28 nm in diameter formed over large areas by pressing sharp stamps into polymer films at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature.

    5. Carbon Nanosheets for Polymeric Nanocomposites with High Thermal Conductivity (pages 2088–2092)

      L. Monica Veca, Mohammed J. Meziani, Wei Wang, Xin Wang, Fushen Lu, Puyu Zhang, Yi Lin, Robert Fee, John W. Connell and Ya-Ping Sun

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802317

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanometer-thick 2D carbon structures (“carbon nanosheets”) are processed from commercially available expanded graphite. These carbon nanosheets are then incorporated in various polymers to produce flexible nanocomposites that exhibit record-setting anisotropic thermal conductivities, which may prove highly valuable in many technological applications.

    6. Intramolecular Donor–Acceptor Regioregular Poly(hexylphenanthrenyl-imidazole thiophene) Exhibits Enhanced Hole Mobility for Heterojunction Solar Cell Applications (pages 2093–2097)

      Yao-Te Chang, So-Lin Hsu, Ming-Hsin Su and Kung-Hwa Wei

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802379

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      PHPIT, a new kind of intramolecular donor–acceptor side-chain-tethered hexylphenanthrenyl-imidazole polythiophene is synthesized. The more-balanced electron and hole mobilities and the enhanced visible- and internal-light absorptions in the devices consisting of annealed PHPIT/PCBM blends both contribute to a much higher short-circuit current density, which in turn led to a power conversion efficiency as high as 4.1%.

    7. Soft Transfer Printing of Chemically Converted Graphene (pages 2098–2102)

      Matthew J. Allen, Vincent C. Tung, Lewis Gomez, Zheng Xu, Li-Min Chen, Kurt S. Nelson, Chongwu Zhou, Richard B. Kaner and Yang Yang

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803000

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A transfer printing process that allows precise patterning of chemically converted graphene is reported. The use of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp and surface energy manipulation resulted in successfully transferring spin-coated materials from one substrate to another. The method is capable of transferring sharp features to precise locations. This represents large-scale, high-throughput transfer printing of chemically converted graphene and paves the way for future complementary circuit design.

  9. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    11. Index
    1. On the Fracture Toughness of Advanced Materials (pages 2103–2110)

      Maximilien E. Launey and Robert O. Ritchie

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803322

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Few engineering materials are limited by their strength; rather they are limited by their fracture toughness. The resistance to fracture of a given material is intimately related to its microstructure. Perfect examples of this are biological materials that offer design strategies for the development of new composites that will open new possibilities in many structural applications demanding combinations of both strength and toughness.

    2. Nanostructured Organic–Inorganic Composite Materials by Twin Polymerization of Hybrid Monomers (pages 2111–2116)

      Stefan Spange and Silke Grund

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802797

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cationic twin polymerization of tetrafurfuryloxysilane yields a nanostructured polyfurfurylalcohol/silica hybrid material in only one fabrication step. Polymerization is carried out in the melt or in organic solvents suitable for cationic polymerization. Monolithic and powdered materials, respectively, are produced, depending on the polymerization technique applied.

  10. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    11. Index

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