Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 24

June 26, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 24

Pages 2453–2556

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Mesoporous Materials: Dye-Anchored Mesoporous Antimony-Doped Tin Oxide Electrochemiluminescence Cell (Adv. Mater. 24/2009)

      Kun Hou, Daniel Puzzo, Michael G. Helander, Shun S. Lo, Leonardo D. Bonifacio, Wendong Wang, Zheng-Hong Lu, Gregory D. Scholes and Geoffery A. Ozin

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990091

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      A long sought after target in materials research has been the synthesis of high quality, optically transparent, electrically conductive thin films that simultaneously provide large surface area and nanocrystalline mesoporosity. On p. 2492, Geoff Ozin and co-workers report a dye-anchored transparent, well-ordered mesoporous antimony-doped tin oxide film that functions as the working electrode in an electrochemiluminescent cell, suggesting opportunities for use in a range of optoelectronic applications.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Hybrid Nonvolatile Memory Devices: One Transistor–One Resistor Devices for Polymer Non-Volatile Memory Applications (Adv. Mater. 24/2009)

      Tae-Wook Kim, Hyejung Choi, Seung-Hwan Oh, Gunuk Wang, Dong-Yu Kim, Hyunsang Hwang and Takhee Lee

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990092

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      Takhee Lee and co-workers demonstrate on p. 2497 that 1T/1R hybrid devices consisting of a silicon transistor (p-MOSFET) and a resistive polymer memory as nonvolatile memory cell elements can be fabricated. The operation of the 1T/1R device can be controlled by the resistance states of the polymer memory device. Written or erased data in the 1T/1R devices can be maintained for more than 104 s.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 24/2009) (pages 2453–2459)

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990093

  4. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Physics and Applications of Bismuth Ferrite (pages 2463–2485)

      Gustau Catalan and James F. Scott

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802849

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      Despite the attention devoted to multiferroic BiFeO3 in recent years, many fundamental aspects, such as the phase diagram, are still poorly understood. The phase diagram in the figure, for example, includes several confirmed phase transitions, but does not account for other observed anomalies both above and below room temperature. These unresolved issues, as well as progress made towards applications, are discussed in this Review.

  5. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Gas Sensors: Room-Temperature Gas Sensing Based on Electron Transfer between Discrete Tin Oxide Nanocrystals and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (Adv. Mater. 24/2009)

      Ganhua Lu, Leonidas E. Ocola and Junhong Chen

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990094

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      Hybrid nanostructures consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) uniformly coated with SnO2 nanocrystals can be used as a novel gas sensing platform, exhibiting high sensitivity to low-concentration gases (NO2, H2, and CO) at room temperature, report Junhong Chen and co-workers on p. 2487. The hybrid nanomaterial provides a new opportunity to engineer sensing devices through electronic transfer between the nanocrystals and the CNT.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Room-Temperature Gas Sensing Based on Electron Transfer between Discrete Tin Oxide Nanocrystals and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (pages 2487–2491)

      Ganhua Lu, Leonidas E. Ocola and Junhong Chen

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803536

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      A new gas-sensing platform for low-concentration gases (NO2, H2, and CO) comprises discrete SnO2 nanocrystals uniformly distributed on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The resulting hybrid nanostructures are highly sensitive, even at room temperature, because their gas sensing abilities rely on electron transfer between the nanocrystals and the CNTs.

    2. Dye-Anchored Mesoporous Antimony-Doped Tin Oxide Electrochemiluminescence Cell (pages 2492–2496)

      Kun Hou, Daniel Puzzo, Michael G. Helander, Shun S. Lo, Leonardo D. Bonifacio, Wendong Wang, Zheng-Hong Lu, Gregory D. Scholes and Geoffery A. Ozin

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803330

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      A ruthenium-based dye chemically tethered to a novel high surface area, conductive, transparent, and well-ordered mesoporous antimony-doped tin oxide film is shown for the first time to function as the working electrode in a high-efficiency electrochemiluminescence cell, suggesting thereby opportunities for its use in a range of optoelectronic device applications.

    3. One Transistor–One Resistor Devices for Polymer Non-Volatile Memory Applications (pages 2497–2500)

      Tae-Wook Kim, Hyejung Choi, Seung-Hwan Oh, Gunuk Wang, Dong-Yu Kim, Hyunsang Hwang and Takhee Lee

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803798

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      1T–1R hybrid-type devices consisting of a silicon transistor and a resistive polymer memory as nonvolatile memory cell elements are demonstrated. Our results show that the operation of the 1T–1R device can be controlled by the resistance states of the polymer memory device. Written or erased data in the 1T–1R devices was maintained for more than 104 s.

    4. High-Performance Organic Optocouplers Based on a Photosensitive Interfacial C60/NPB Heterojunction (pages 2501–2504)

      Guifang Dong, Haiyang Zheng, Lian Duan, Liduo Wang and Yong Qiu

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803152

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      An organic optocoupler composed entirely of small molecules is shown to exhibit the highest current-transfer ratio reported to-date. Based on a photosensitive C60/NPB interfacial heterojunction, its frequency response is also significantly better than in previously reported systems. It suggests a new way in which organic optocouplers that behave comparably to commercial inorganic optocouplers may be achieved.

    5. Direct Condensation Method for the Preparation of Organic-Nanoparticle Dispersions (pages 2505–2510)

      Stefan Köstler, Andreas Rudorfer, Anja Haase, Valentin Satzinger, Georg Jakopic and Volker Ribitsch

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900081

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      Organic nanoparticle dispersions are prepared via a versatile technique. Particles are formed by evaporation of aromatic hydrocarbons (like pentacene, rubrene, and tetracene) in an inert atmosphere and condensation of the vapor in a liquid medium. This allows the preparation of stable and concentrated dispersions of organic nanoparticles, showing interesting optical properties and potential applications in organic electronics and sensors.

    6. Electric-Field-Induced Gap States in Pentacene (pages 2511–2515)

      Dietmar Knipp and John E. Northrup

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802173

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      Electrical measurements of a pentacene (Pn) thin-film transistor reveal that oxygen exposure under certain bias voltages results in the formation of Pn gap states, whose influence on transistor properties is relevant to the development of organic electronics. A model explaining the origin of these states is presented, and the current/voltage characteristics of the transistor are simulated using results from pseudopotential density functional theory.

    7. A Novel Approach to Addressable 4 Teradot/in.2 Patterned Media (pages 2516–2519)

      Shuaigang Xiao, XiaoMin Yang, Soojin Park, Dieter Weller and Thomas P. Russell

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802087

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      Stable addressable self-assembled dot arrays with an areal density of 1.3–3.8  teradot/in.2 and a resolution enhancement of at least a factor of 4 are achieved by combining block copolymers (BCPs) in the strong segregation limit, which have spherical microdomains (see inset), with chemically nanopatterned surfaces. The SEM image at the edge of a BCP thin film shows a dense BCP array (see figure, bottom) and the nanopatterned substrate (top).

    8. Self-Supported Ion-Conductive Membrane-Based Transistors (pages 2520–2523)

      Nikolai J. Kaihovirta, Carl-Johan Wikman, Tapio Mäkelä, Carl-Eric Wilén and Ronald Österbacka

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801817

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      A new type of low-voltage organic transistor is manufactured using a thick ion-conducting membrane as gate insulator. High current output at 1 V of operation is achieved. The versatile properties of the novel insulator are shown by driving an electrochromic display pixel and a transistor on the same membran.e

    9. Low-Temperature Plasma-Assisted Nanotransfer Printing between Thermoplastic Polymers (pages 2524–2529)

      Deuk Yeon Lee, Daniel R. Hines, Christopher M. Stafford, Christopher L. Soles, Eric K. Lin and Gottlieb S. Oehrlein

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803121

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      Plasma activation of thermoplastic polymer surfaces enables nanotransfer printing (NTP) at dramatically lower processing temperatures. Polar functional groups introduced by plasma surface activation render the polymer surfaces hydrophilic and cause a dramatic increase in interfacial adhesion, thus lowering the temperature at which NTP can be successfully performed to below the glass-transition temperature of each polymer.

    10. Patterning of Solution-Processed Semiconducting Polymers in High-Mobility Thin-Film Transistors by Physical Delamination (pages 2530–2535)

      Jui-Fen Chang and Henning Sirringhaus

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803794

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      Patterning of high-mobility semiconducting polymer thin films is essential to prevent undesirable crosstalk in realization of integrated circuits. We present here two simple selective physical delamination methods that allow clean and high-resolution patterning of semiconducting polymers for thin-film transistors, leading to a significant reduction in OFF current while retaining the high field-effect mobilities of the unpatterned polymer films.

    11. Designed Synthesis of Coaxial SnO2@carbon Hollow Nanospheres for Highly Reversible Lithium Storage (pages 2536–2539)

      Xiong Wen Lou, Chang Ming Li and Lynden A. Archer

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803439

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      A proof-of-concept structural design is demonstrated for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries anode materials by multistep synthesis of coaxial SnO2@carbon hollow nanospheres. This material integrates two beneficial features: hollow structure and carbon nanopainting. When evaluated for reversible lithium storage, these functional materials manifest excellent cycling performance and rate capabilities.

    12. Solvent-Vapor-Induced Tunability of Self-Assembled Block Copolymer Patterns (pages 2540–2545)

      Yeon Sik Jung and Caroline A. Ross

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802855

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      Self-assembly of a block copolymer into cylindrical and/or perforated lamellar arrays within substrate trenches can be extensively tuned during the solvent-annealing process. Following reactive-ion etching, SEM images reveal that the solvent mixing ratio and the vapor pressure determine the type of array obtained and influence the dimensions of the repeat unit.

  7. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Synthesis of Microspheres as Versatile Functional Scaffolds for Materials Science Applications (pages 2547–2553)

      Leonie Barner

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900373

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      Polymeric microspheres can be used as functional scaffolds in materials science and analytical applications. Poly(divinyl benzene) microspheres are conveniently functionalized by controlled/living polymerization methods (e.g., reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer – RAFT, atom transfer radical polymerization – ATRP) and by highly orthogonal click reactions, resulting in functional polymeric microspheres.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Synthesis of Microspheres as Versatile Functional Scaffolds for Materials Science Applications

      Vol. 21, Issue 29, Article first published online: 31 JUL 2009

  8. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index

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