Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 25‐26

Special Issue: Special Issue: Nanoionics and Nanoelectronics

July 13, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 25-26

Pages 2561–2726

Issue edited by: Joachim Maier, Klaus Kern

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. Nanostructured Electrodes: The Role of Surface and Interface Energy on Phase Stability of Nanosized Insertion Compounds (Adv. Mater. 25–26/2009)

      Marnix Wagemaker, Fokko M. Mulder and Anton Van der Ven

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990096

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover shows three structures of the Li-ion battery electrode material LixFePO4 having two coexisting phases Li-rich: dark blue, Li-poor: light blue. The vertical decreasing dimension represents the downsizing of the particle size which leads to more similar Li-ion equilibrium concentrations in both phases, as indicated by the lower contrast between the blue shaded Li-ions. This result, reported by Marnix Wagemaker and co-workers on p. 2703, helps explain the changes in equilibrium properties in nanostructured insertion compounds such as Li-ion battery electrodes and H-storage materials.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. Quantum Dots: Self-Assembled Quantum Dot Molecules (Adv. Mater. 25–26/2009)

      Lijuan Wang, Armando Rastelli, Suwit Kiravittaya, Mohamed Benyoucef and Oliver G. Schmidt

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990097

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover shows a 2D photoluminescence intensity map from a self-assembled lateral quantum dot molecule in an electric field applied along the molecular axis. The coupling of the two quantum dots is evidenced by intricate spectral line anticrossings, indicated by dotted lines, as reported in the review by Lijuan Wang and co-workers on p. 2601. A 3D AFM image of a lateral quantum dot molecule overlapped with the ground-state electron wavefunction is shown in the inset.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 25–26/2009) (pages 2561–2566)

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990098

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Nanoionics and Nanoelectronics (page 2569)

      Klaus Kern and Joachim Maier

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901896

  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. Thermodynamics of Nanosystems with a Special View to Charge Carriers (pages 2571–2585)

      Joachim Maier

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900598

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      If the size of crystallites is reduced, a variety of exciting effects on the ground structure, as well as on the ionic and electronic defect structure, occur. This contribution deals with the equilibrium thermodynamics of such systems.

    2. Carbon-Based Field-Effect Transistors for Nanoelectronics (pages 2586–2600)

      Marko Burghard, Hagen Klauk and Klaus Kern

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803582

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The carbon nanostructures graphene, carbon nanotubes, and π-conjugated organic molecules currently attract immense interest as conducting channels in field-effect transistors. In this review, we highlight recent strategies to enhance the carrier mobility in these devices. Moreover, advances in their implementation into logic circuits on flexible substrates are presented.

    3. Self-Assembled Quantum Dot Molecules (pages 2601–2618)

      Lijuan Wang, Armando Rastelli, Suwit Kiravittaya, Mohamed Benyoucef and Oliver G. Schmidt

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803109

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dot molecules (QDMs) obtained by epitaxial growth are reviewed. A comprehensive overview of the development and current stage of the research on QDMs composed of vertically (in the growth direction) or laterally (in the growth plane) aligned QDs is provided.

    4. Ionically Conducting Two-Dimensional Heterostructures (pages 2619–2631)

      Xiangxin Guo and Joachim Maier

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900412

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ionically conducting two-dimensional heterostructures advantageously allow investigation of interfacial effects on ionic conductivity, storage and reactivity. As the interface spacing continuously decreases from micrometer- down to nanometer-scale, not only observation of size effects but also generation of a new artificial crystalline material can be achieved.

    5. Redox-Based Resistive Switching Memories – Nanoionic Mechanisms, Prospects, and Challenges (pages 2632–2663)

      Rainer Waser, Regina Dittmann, Georgi Staikov and Kristof Szot

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900375

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This review article introduces resistive switching processes that are being considered for nanoelectronic nonvolatile memories. The three main classes are based on an electrochemical metallization mechanism, a valence change mechanism, and a thermochemical mechanism, respectively. The current understanding of the microscopic mechanisms is discussed and the scaling potential is outlined..

    6. Lithium Storage in Carbon Nanostructures (pages 2664–2680)

      Nitin A. Kaskhedikar and Joachim Maier

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901079

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Besides discussing lithium storage in regular carbon structures, this review article emphasizes in particular on storage in carbon-based nanostructures.

    7. Silicon Nanowires: A Review on Aspects of their Growth and their Electrical Properties (pages 2681–2702)

      Volker Schmidt, Joerg V. Wittemann, Stephan Senz and Ulrich Gösele

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803754

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper summarizes some of the essential aspects of silicon nanowire growth and of their electrical properties, with the focus being on chemical vapor deposition of silicon nanowires. The different wire growth techniques, the choice of catalyst material, and the thermodynamics of the vapor–liquid–solid growth mechanism are discussed. Experimental and theoretical aspects of nanowire doping, and mobility are considered.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. The Role of Surface and Interface Energy on Phase Stability of Nanosized Insertion Compounds (pages 2703–2709)

      Marnix Wagemaker, Fokko M. Mulder and Anton Van der Ven

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803038

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thermodynamic theory reveals the impact of surface and interface energies on the equilibrium properties and solubility limits of interstitial ions in nanosized crystallites. Applied to LixFePO4 especially interface energy contributions play important roles, and their effect explains observations of the narrowing of electrochemically measured miscibility gaps in nanostructured electrodes.

    2. LiFePO4 Nanoparticles Embedded in a Nanoporous Carbon Matrix: Superior Cathode Material for Electrochemical Energy-Storage Devices (pages 2710–2714)

      Xing-Long Wu, Ling-Yan Jiang, Fei-Fei Cao, Yu-Guo Guo and Li-Jun Wan

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802998

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An optimized nanostructure design for high-power, high-energy lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors is realized by fabricating a nanocomposite with highly dispersed nanoparticles of active materials in a nanoporous carbon matrix. A nano-LiFePO4/nanoporous carbon matrix nanocomposite forms a bridge between a supercapacitor and a battery electrode and offers a reasonable compromise between rate and capacity.

    3. Stabilizers of Particle Size and Morphology: a Road Towards High-Rate Performance Insertion Materials (pages 2715–2719)

      Janez Jamnik, Robert Dominko, Bostjan Erjavec, Maja Remskar, Albin Pintar and Miran Gaberscek

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803032

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It is demonstrated that using a very small amount of ceramic surface stabilizers (not forming coatings) can prevent particle growth and completely preserve their morphology during heating. For the example of titania, a supreme lithium insertion-rate performance is exhibited by such stabilized samples.

    4. Spatially Resolved Potential Distribution in Carbon Nanotube Cross-Junction Devices (pages 2720–2724)

      Eduardo J. H. Lee, Kannan Balasubramanian, Marko Burghard and Klaus Kern

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803545

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Crossed-nanotube junctions, the basic constituents of carbon nanotube networks, are investigated by scanning photocurrent microscopy. The location of the predominant electrostatic potential drop, at the electrical contacts or at the junction, is found to be highly dependent on the transport regime. Also, whereas Schottky barriers are formed at M-S (metal–semiconductor) nanotube crossings, isotype heterojunctions are formed at S-S ones (figure).

  7. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Index

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