Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 27

July 20, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 27

Pages 2733–2834

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Correction
    10. Index
    1. DNA Sensors: Highly Sensitive, Mechanically Stable Nanopore Sensors for DNA Analysis (Adv. Mater. 27/2009)

      Bala Murali Venkatesan, Brian Dorvel, Sukru Yemenicioglu, Nicholas Watkins, Ivan Petrov and Rashid Bashir

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990100

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new solid state nanopore biosensor for the analysis of individual DNA molecules is reported by Rashid Bashir and co-workers on p. 2771. The cover illustrates the passage of double-stranded DNA through an Al2O3 nanopore sensor fabricated using ALD and e-beam-induced sputtering processes. Hexagonal γ-phase Al2O3 nanocrystallites form during pore formation as shown, improving the mechanical stability and sensitivity of these nanopore sensors. The CMOS-compatible nature of this process establishes this technology as a potential candidate for next-generation DNA sequencing.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Correction
    10. Index
    1. Microfluidic Endoskeletons: Materials of Controlled Shape and Stiffness with Photocurable Microfluidic Endoskeleton (Adv. Mater. 27/2009)

      Suk Tai Chang, Ahmet Burak Uçar, Garrett R. Swindlehurst, Robert O. Bradley IV, Frederick J. Renk and Orlin D. Velev

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990101

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Photocurable microfluidic channel networks in thin layers of polydimethylsiloxane can act as on-demand endoskeletons to lock-in specific shapes, report Orlin Velev and co-workers on p. 2803. The light-induced solidification of photopolymer inside the microchannel networks leads to drastic increases in the elastic and bending moduli of the elastomeric material. The fabrication process is simple and scalable, and could make use of other shape-memory materials, creating the potential to fabricate custom shapes (e.g., containers, protective exoskeletons, or supports) using simple heat, light, or magnetic/electric field triggers.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Correction
    10. Index
  4. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Correction
    10. Index
    1. Charge Transport in Disordered Organic Materials and Its Relevance to Thin-Film Devices: A Tutorial Review (pages 2741–2761)

      Nir Tessler, Yevgeni Preezant, Noam Rappaport and Yohai Roichman

      Version of Record online: 7 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803541

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Different models for charge transport in disordered organic materials are reviewed. The tutorial aspect manifests itself in an attempt to generate intuitive understanding of the processes and in highlighting the hidden assumptions of the models. An emphasis is given to the phenomena relevant to modern devices operating at or not far from room temperature.

  5. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Correction
    10. Index
    1. Block Copolymer Nanostructures: Nanoscopic Morphologies in Block Copolymer Nanorods as Templates for Atomic-Layer Deposition of Semiconductors (Adv. Mater. 27/2009)

      Yong Wang, Yong Qin, Andreas Berger, Eric Yau, Changcheng He, Lianbing Zhang, Ulrich Gösele, Mato Knez and Martin Steinhart

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990103

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The frontispiece shows a TEM image of block copolymer nanorods exhibiting nanoscopic domain structures visualized by selective staining. The insets represent the methodology for producing semiconductor nanostructures reported by Yong Wang, Martin Steinhart, and co-workers on p. 2763. The first panel shows block copolymer nanorods, the second, the nanorods after conversion of the nanoscopic domain structure into a mesopore structure, and the third, the complex 1D semiconductor nanostructures obtained by ALD using the mesopores as templates.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Correction
    10. Index
    1. Nanoscopic Morphologies in Block Copolymer Nanorods as Templates for Atomic-Layer Deposition of Semiconductors (pages 2763–2766)

      Yong Wang, Yong Qin, Andreas Berger, Eric Yau, Changcheng He, Lianbing Zhang, Ulrich Gösele, Mato Knez and Martin Steinhart

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900136

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Block-copolymer nanorods containing mesopore structures derived from confinement-induced nanoscopic morphologies were used as templates for atomic-layer deposition. Diffusion of the ALD precursors through the polymeric scaffold and deposition of ZnO on the walls of the internal mesopores yielded 1D ZnO nanostructures with hierarchical architectures containing helices and stacked doughnuts as structure motifs.

    2. Fabrication of a High-Brightness Blue-Light-Emitting Diode Using a ZnO-Nanowire Array Grown on p-GaN Thin Film (pages 2767–2770)

      Xiao-Mei Zhang, Ming-Yen Lu, Yue Zhang, Lih-J. Chen and Zhong Lin Wang

      Version of Record online: 25 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802686

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bright n-ZnO nanowire/p-GaN film hybrid heterojunction light-emitting-diode (LED) devices are fabricated by directly growing n-type ZnO-nanowire arrays on p-GaN wafers. UV–blue electroluminescence emission was observed from the heterojunction diodes, and the heterojunction LED device exhibited a high sensitivity in responding to UV irradiation.

    3. Highly Sensitive, Mechanically Stable Nanopore Sensors for DNA Analysis (pages 2771–2776)

      Bala Murali Venkatesan, Brian Dorvel, Sukru Yemenicioglu, Nicholas Watkins, Ivan Petrov and Rashid Bashir

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803786

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly sensitive, mechanically robust Al2O3 nanopores are fabricated and characterized. These sensors allow for size control with sub-nanometer precision, chemical modification, and exhibit superior noise performance and increased lifetime over their solid-state counterparts. This new class of nanopore sensor is used in dsDNA studies and finds broad application in bio-nanotechnology.

    4. Highly Ordered, Millimeter-Scale, Continuous, Single-Crystalline Graphene Monolayer Formed on Ru (0001) (pages 2777–2780)

      Yi Pan, Haigang Zhang, Dongxia Shi, Jiatao Sun, Shixuan Du, Feng Liu and Hong-jun Gao

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800761

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A single-crystalline graphene monolayer is grown on a Ru(0001) surface by thermal annealing of a ruthenium single crystal containing carbon. The layer is highly ordered, continuous, and exhibits perfect crystallinity, with good long-range order on the order of millimeters (see figure). These findings offer high-quality graphene layers for fundamental research as well as large-scale graphene wafers for device fabrication and integration.

    5. Mapping the Interactions among Biomaterials, Adsorbed Proteins, and Human Embryonic Stem Cells (pages 2781–2786)

      Ying Mei, Sharon Gerecht, Michael Taylor, Andrew J. Urquhart, Said R. Bogatyrev, Seung-Woo Cho, Martyn C. Davies, Morgan R. Alexander, Robert S. Langer and Daniel G. Anderson

      Version of Record online: 9 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803184

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An integrated high-throughput polymer synthesis and rapid material/protein/cell interaction assays were developed to optimize stem cell microenvironments. Microarrayed polymers were synthesized and studied for the ability to support the growth of partially differentiated human embryonic stem cells. In parallel, a programmed laser scanning cytometry system was developed to allow for rapid quantification of cell material interaction.

    6. A Polymersome Nanoreactor with Controllable Permeability Induced by Stimuli-Responsive Block Copolymers (pages 2787–2791)

      Kyoung Taek Kim, Jeroen J. L. M. Cornelissen, Roeland J. M. Nolte and Jan C. M. van Hest

      Version of Record online: 25 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900300

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A method to generate and control the permeability of polymersome membranes using mixtures of amphiphilic and stimuli-responsive boronic acid-containing block copolymers is reported. The latter block copolymers form phase-separated domains in the polymersomes, which can be dissolved by increasing the pH of the medium or by introducing sugar molecules that covalently bind to the boronic acid moieties.

    7. Natural-Synthetic Polyblend Nanofibers for Biomedical Applications (pages 2792–2797)

      Narayan Bhattarai, Zhensheng Li, Jonathan Gunn, Matthew Leung, Ashleigh Cooper, Dennis Edmondson, Omid Veiseh, Ming-Hong Chen, Yong Zhang, Richard G. Ellenbogen and Miqin Zhang

      Version of Record online: 7 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802513

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The ability to produce well-blended nanofibers from natural and synthetic polymers represents a significant advancement in development of composite materials with desired structures and material properties. The nanofiber presented here exhibits excellent structural stability and mechanical and biological properties favorable for biomedical applications, and offers a new nanofibrous platform for development of matrices for various biomedical applications.

    8. High-Resolution Contact Printing with Chemically Patterned Flat Stamps Fabricated by Nanoimprint Lithography (pages 2798–2802)

      Xuexin Duan, Yiping Zhao, András Perl, Erwin Berenschot, David N. Reinhoudt and Jurriaan Huskens

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803809

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chemically patterned flat stamps provide an effective solution to avoid mechanical stamp-stability problems currently encountered in microcontact printing. A new method is developed to fabricate chemical patterns on a flat PDMS stamp using nanoimprint lithography. Sub-100 nm gold patterns are successfully replicated by these chemically patterned flat PDMS stamps.

    9. Materials of Controlled Shape and Stiffness with Photocurable Microfluidic Endoskeleton (pages 2803–2807)

      Suk Tai Chang, Ahmet Burak Uçar, Garrett R. Swindlehurst, Robert O. Bradley IV, Frederick J. Renk and Orlin D. Velev

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803638

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Photocurable microfluidic channel networks in thin layers of polydimethylsiloxane can act as on-demand endoskeletons to lock-in specific shapes. The light-induced solidification of photopolymer inside the microchannel networks leads to drastic increases in the elastic and bending moduli of the elastomeric material.

    10. A New Poly(thienylenevinylene) Derivative with High Mobility and Oxidative Stability for Organic Thin-Film Transistors and Solar Cells (pages 2808–2814)

      Bogyu Lim, Kang-Jun Baeg, Hyung-Gu Jeong, Jang Jo, Hyungsoo Kim, Jeong-Woo Park, Yong-Young Noh, Doojin Vak, Jeong-Ho Park, Ji-Woong Park and Dong-Yu Kim

      Version of Record online: 25 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803700

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel thiophene-thienylenevinylene copolymer is synthesized and evaluated for use in organic field-effect transistors and organic solar cells. PETV12T shows good solution processability and high structural organization after annealing. Organic thin-film transistors based on the polymer exhibit high mobility and a high resistance to oxidation. In addition, PETV12T shows potential as an electron donor in bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    11. Biofilm-Engineered Nanostructures (pages 2815–2818)

      Xiaolei Wang, Hui Zhu, Fan Yang and Xiurong Yang

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802598

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The use of biofilms as nanostructure-engineering materials is discussed and exemplified using ZnO nanorods. Three examples are presented for illustration, the immobilization of ZnO-nanorod arrays on the inner wall of a polystyrene centrifuge tube using S. thermophilus, the morphological organization of ZnO “filters” using S. thermophilus. And the design and implementation of a ZnO-decorated Ag framework using E. coli.

    12. Micropatterned Carbon Nanotube–Gel Composite as Photothermal Material (pages 2819–2823)

      Eijiro Miyako, Hideya Nagata, Ken Hirano and Takahiro Hirotsu

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802885

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Micropatterned carbon nanotube (CNT)–gel composites are prepared using a new and simple method. A micropatterned CNT–gel composite is capable of fast thermal control in microspaces of this composite by an NIR laser.

    13. Ordered High-Density Si [100] Nanowire Arrays Epitaxially Grown by Bottom Imprint Method (pages 2824–2828)

      Zhang Zhang, Tomohiro Shimizu, Stephan Senz and Ulrich Gösele

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802156

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel bottom imprint method to fabricate high-quality Si [100] nanowire arrays is demonstrated. This new approach combines the functions of a high-ordering AAO template as a stamp and template simultaneously. By the protective polymer layer in the hot imprint, the vertical 40 nm Si nanowire arrays grow epitaxially on the Si substrate with a narrow size distribution

  7. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Correction
    10. Index
    1. Impurity Doping in Silicon Nanowires (pages 2829–2832)

      Naoki Fukata

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900376

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Raman scattering and electron spin resonance methods clarify the states of dopant atoms in Si nanowires by the observation of local vibrational peaks of B, Fano broadening of the optical phonon peak, and ESR signals of conduction electrons. These clearly demonstrate that B and P atoms are electrically activated in the crystalline core of Si nanowires.

  8. Correction

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Correction
    10. Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Highly Ordered, Millimeter-Scale, Continuous, Single-Crystalline Graphene Monolayer Formed on Ru (0001)

      Yi Pan, Haigang Zhang, Dongxia Shi, Jiatao Sun, Shixuan Du, Feng Liu and Hong-jun Gao

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990105

      This article corrects:

      Highly Ordered, Millimeter-Scale, Continuous, Single-Crystalline Graphene Monolayer Formed on Ru (0001)

      Vol. 21, Issue 27, 2777–2780, Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2008

  9. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Correction
    10. Index

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