Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

July 27, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 28

Pages 2839–2934

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Index
    1. Nanocomposite Foams: Conducting Nanocomposite Polymer Foams from Ice-Crystal-Templated Assembly of Mixtures of Colloids (Adv. Mater. 28/2009)

      Catheline A. L. Colard, Richard A. Cave, Nadia Grossiord, James A. Covington and Stefan A. F. Bon

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990106

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      The cover shows an electron microscopy image of a nanocomposite “soft” polymer foam reinforced with armored cell walls of “hard” nanoparticles obtained by freeze-drying a mixture of colloids dispersed in water. On p. 2894 Stefan Bon and co-workers demonstrate the versatility of their ice-crystal templating assembly strategy by fabricating a gas sensor from a “soft” polymer latex, silica nanoparticles, and colloidal carbon black.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Index
    1. Photonic Crystals: Silicon Direct Opals (Adv. Mater. 28/2009)

      Marta Ibisate, Dolores Golmayo and Cefe López

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990107

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      The inside cover shows an image of a porous silicon direct opal fabricated by magnesiothermic reduction. Using chemical vapor deposition to infill the porous structure, a nonporous silicon opal can be obtained. The optical properties of opals formed with this method, reported by Cefe López and co-workers on p. 2899, demonstrate the high quality of the final product.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Index
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 28/2009) (pages 2839–2845)

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990108

  4. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Index
    1. Tuning the Amphiphilicity of Building Blocks: Controlled Self-Assembly and Disassembly for Functional Supramolecular Materials (pages 2849–2864)

      Yapei Wang, Huaping Xu and Xi Zhang

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803276

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      Amphiphilicity is one of the molecular bases for self-assembly. This review gives an overview on progress in controlled self-assembly and disassembly through tuning the amphiphilicity of building blocks for the fabrication of functional supramolecular materials.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Index
    1. Self-Assembly of Ordered Semiconductor Nanoholes by Ion Beam Sputtering (pages 2865–2869)

      Qiangmin Wei, Xiuli Zhou, Bhuwan Joshi, Yanbin Chen, Kun-Dar Li, Qihuo Wei, Kai Sun and Lumin Wang

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803258

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      Periodic nanohole arrays are formed on a Ge substrate by self-assembly using focused ion beam sputtering at normal incidence with an energy of 5 keV. The figure shows an SEM image of a hexagonally ordered hole domain that has hexagonally ordered quantum dots—20 nm diameter and 3 nm height—around each hole The structured Ge has high surface area and a considerably blue-shifted energy gap.

    2. The Inlaid Al2O3 Tunnel Switch for Ultrathin Ferroelectric Films (pages 2870–2875)

      An Quan Jiang, Hyun Ju Lee, Gun Hwan Kim and Cheol Seong Hwang

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802924

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      Ferroelectric switching in ultrathin Al2O3/PZT bilayers is studied and used to modulate the applied electric field, allowing the development of novel applications of the combined dielectric tunnel switch/ferroelectric functional layer that can assist in the development of completely new types of electronic, electromechanical, and electrochemical devices.

    3. Energy-Absorbing Hybrid Composites Based on Alternate Carbon-Nanotube and Inorganic Layers (pages 2876–2880)

      Qiang Zhang, Mengqiang Zhao, Yi Liu, Anyuan Cao, Weizhong Qian, Yunfeng Lu and Fei Wei

      Article first published online: 22 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900123

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      Hybrid materials with aligned carbon nanotubes intercalating naturally layered compounds (see upper figures) are fabricated using general metal-ion intercalation and in situ growth. As indicated by SEM images (lower figures), they exhibit periodic and hierarchical structures. The ability to control their composition resulted in some samples possessing excellent mechanical properties, such as high energy absorption during compression.

    4. Understanding the Nature of Ultrafast Polarization Dynamics of Ferroelectric Memory in the Multiferroic BiFeO3 (pages 2881–2885)

      Dhanvir Singh Rana, Iwao Kawayama, Krushna Mavani, Kouhei Takahashi, Hironaru Murakami and Masayoshi Tonouchi

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802094

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      The crystallographic anisotropy in electromagnetic terahertz radiation from multiferroic BiFeO3 (100), (110), and (111) films suggests the ultrafast depolarization of ferroelectric order as a new mechanism of terahertz emission. This implies that the spontaneous polarization in ferroelectric materials can be manipulated in time scale of picoseconds, thus paving the way to ultrafast data-storage devices based on nonvolatile ferroelectric memories.

    5. Electrically Active Artificial Pupil Showing Amoeba-Like Pseudopodial Deformation (pages 2886–2888)

      Toshihiro Hirai, Takafumi Ogiwara, Katsuya Fujii, Takamitsu Ueki, Ken Kinoshita and Midori Takasaki

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802217

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      A PVC gel pupil that can elongate and change its curvature in response to an applied voltage of 400 V, with a deformation time of about 6 s, is demosntrated. The displacement in the radial direction was about 470 μm, which corresponded to approximately 100% of the thickness of the pupil, with a leak current at the nanoampere level.

    6. Large-Scale Fabrication of Boron Nitride Nanosheets and Their Utilization in Polymeric Composites with Improved Thermal and Mechanical Properties (pages 2889–2893)

      Chunyi Zhi, Yoshio Bando, Chengchun Tang, Hiroaki Kuwahara and Dimitri Golberg

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900323

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      Ultrathin boron nitride nanosheets are fabricated and detailed morphological and structural microscopic studies of are carried out. Polymeric composites containing BN nanosheets exhibit a remarkable reduction of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and possess enhanced elastic modulus and strength.

    7. Conducting Nanocomposite Polymer Foams from Ice-Crystal-Templated Assembly of Mixtures of Colloids (pages 2894–2898)

      Catheline A. L. Colard, Richard A. Cave, Nadia Grossiord, James A. Covington and Stefan A. F. Bon

      Article first published online: 1 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803007

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fabrication of conducting nanocomposite- reinforced soft polymer foams is demonstrated. These multicomponent cellular materials are built from a mixture of colloids dispersed in water by freeze–drying, thereby using ice crystals as template for the porous structure. An excluded-volume effect armors the “soft”-polymer cell walls with “hard” nanoparticles, thereby enhancing the mechanical robustness of the foams.

    8. Silicon Direct Opals (pages 2899–2902)

      Marta Ibisate, Dolores Golmayo and Cefe López

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900188

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      The use of magnesiothermic reduction and CVD to obtain Si spheres is reported. The porous structures of the Si spheres after the former process and the infilling of their pores after the latter one are observed. The optical properties of opals formed with these spheres are used to assess the power of the method and the quality of the final product.

    9. Carbon Nanotubes Carrying Cell-Adhesion Peptides do not Interfere with Neuronal Functionality (pages 2903–2908)

      Claire Gaillard, Giada Cellot, Shouping Li, Francesca Maria Toma, Hélène Dumortier, Giampiero Spalluto, Barbara Cacciari, Maurizio Prato, Laura Ballerini and Alberto Bianco

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900050

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      Water-soluble carbon nanotubes functionalized with cell-adhesion peptides do not affect the viability of different cell types, including Jurkat cells, splenocytes, and neurons. They also do not modify the neuronal morphology and basic functions, thus representing a promising candidate for the exploitation of novel drug-delivery systems or for designing a new generation of self-assembling nerve bridges.

    10. Generation of Bioactive Materials with Rapid Self-Assembling Resorcinarene-Peptides (pages 2909–2915)

      Mirren Charnley, Kathryn Fairfull-Smith, Saubhik Haldar, Richard Elliott, Sally L. McArthur, Nicholas H. Williams and John W. Haycock

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802731

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      Adhesive resorcinarene molecules rapidly self-assemble on a wide range of material surfaces. We have created resorcinarenes that contain a biologically active terminal GKP-D-V anti-inflammatory peptide by a rapid “dip-and-dry” forming method. The growth of neural Schwann and fibroblast cells on a layer of resorcinarene-GKP-D-V demonstrate inhibition of inflammatory signaling.

    11. Electroluminescent Cu-doped CdS Quantum Dots (pages 2916–2920)

      Jan W. Stouwdam and René A. J. Janssen

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803223

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      Incorporating Cu-doped CdS quantum dots into a polymer host produces efficient light-emitting diodes. The Cu dopant creates a trap level that aligns with the valence band of the host, enabling the direct injection of holes into the quantum dots, which act as emitters. At low current densities, the luminance efficiency maximizes at 9 cd A−1, providing an external quantum efficiency of 5%.

    12. Engineered Polymer Brushes by Carbon Templating (pages 2921–2925)

      Marin Steenackers, Rainer Jordan, Alexander Küller and Michael Grunze

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900500

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      A general method for the fabrication of stable polymer brushes of programmable three-dimensional shapes and different chemical functions is presented. The carbon templating method allows the functionalization of a broad variety of substrates without the need of a specific surface chemistry. As an example, the AFM scan of complex polymer brush structures on a bare GaAs substrate is shown.

  6. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Index
    1. Magnonics: Spin Waves on the Nanoscale (pages 2927–2932)

      Sebastian Neusser and Dirk Grundler

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900809

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      High-quality nanopatterned magnetic media offer new ways to transmit and process information without moving electrical charges. This new functionality is enabled by spin waves. They are confined by novel functioning principles, which make them especially suitable to operate at the nanoscale. We report recent advances in this rapidly increasing research field called magnonics.

  7. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review Article
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Index
    1. Author Index and Subject Index Adv. Mater. 28/2009 (pages 2933–2934)

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990109

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