Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 29

August 7, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 29

Pages 2939–3030

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    10. Corrections
    11. Index
    1. Silicon Pillars: Ultrahigh-Crystalline-Quality Silicon Pillars Formed by Millimeter-Wave Annealing of Amorphous Silicon on Glass (Adv. Mater. 29/2009)

      Fude Liu, Kim M. Jones, Yueqin Xu, William Nemeth, John Lohr, Jeff Neilson, Manuel J. Romero, Mowafak M. Al-Jassim and David L. Young

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990110

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Unique, three-dimensional structures—silicon pillars—are formed by millisecond long, single-pulse annealing of 110-GHz millimeter-wave radiation incident upon intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films deposited on glass by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), as demonstrated by Fude Liu and co-workers on p. 3002. The cover shows a field-emission secondary-electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of silicon pillars taken at a sample tilt angle of 52°.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    10. Corrections
    11. Index
    1. Nanotube Arrays: Morphology Control of Nanotube Arrays (Adv. Mater. 29/2009)

      Zhifeng Huang, Kenneth D. Harris and Michael J. Brett

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990111

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On p. 2983 Michael J. Brett and co-workers demonstrate a template-directed technique to produce arrays of silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) with highly engineerable morphology. Fabrication steps include glancing angle deposition (GLAD) of the templates, low-pressure CVD of a shell-Si coating, ion milling to expose the templates, and wet-chemical etching for removal of the templates. The technique may be generally adapted to a wide variety of morphologies and NT materials.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    10. Corrections
    11. Index
  4. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    10. Corrections
    11. Index
    1. Biomimetic Nanostructures: Diatomaceous Lessons in Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (Adv. Mater. 29/2009)

      Dusan Losic, James G. Mitchell and Nicolas H. Voelcker

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990113

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows a series of SEM and AFM images of silica structures from several different diatom species. These images demonstrate remarkable structural diversity and unique porous architectures of diatoms justifying their status as the world's smallest nanofabrication factories. Further details can be found in the article by Nicolas Voelcker and co-workers on p. 2947.

  5. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    10. Corrections
    11. Index
    1. Diatomaceous Lessons in Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (pages 2947–2958)

      Dusan Losic, James G. Mitchell and Nicolas H. Voelcker

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803778

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The world's smallest silica nanofabrication factories: a remarkable diversity of shapes and pore architectures of diatom biosilica irrefutably demonstrates precision and brilliance of natural design at the micro and nanoscale, providing a range of lessons that current and future nanotechnology researchers can learn from diatoms.

  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    10. Corrections
    11. Index
    1. Soft Langmuir–Blodgett Technique for Hard Nanomaterials (pages 2959–2981)

      Somobrata Acharya, Jonathan P. Hill and Katsuhiko Ariga

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802648

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The development of assembly of hard nanomaterials via the soft Langmuir–Blodgett technique is summarized in this review. After a brief summary on the basics of nanomaterials, examples of LB assemblies of nanomaterials are described according to types of nanomaterials: nanoparticles, nanorods, nanowires, nanotubes, and nanosheets, with description of remaining challenges for the LB films of hard nanomaterials upon comparison with soft material couterparts.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    10. Corrections
    11. Index
    1. Morphology Control of Nanotube Arrays (pages 2983–2987)

      Zhifeng Huang, Kenneth D. Harris and Michael J. Brett

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900269

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Arrays of silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) with controllable architectures, wall thicknesses and crystallinity are fabricated by a new template-assisted technique. The method includes a sequence of glancing angle deposition of the templates, low-pressure CVD shell-Si coating, ion-milling to expose the templates, and wet-chemical etching for template removal. The technique may be generally adapted to a wide variety of morphologies and NT materials.

    2. Correlating Nanomorphology with Charge-Transport Anisotropy in Conjugated-Polymer Thin Films (pages 2988–2992)

      Yi-Fang Huang, Chan-Wei Chang, Detlef-Matthias Smilgies, U-Ser Jeng, Anto Regis Inigo, Jonathon David White, Kang-Chuang Li, Tsong-Shin Lim, Tai-De Li, Hsiang-Yun Chen, Show-An Chen, Wen-Chang Chen and Wun-Shain Fann

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803341

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Anisotropic mobility in spin-coated MEH-PPV films is due to an interfacial layer of several nanometers at the film-substrate interface with a higher electron density assisted by local chain alignment parallel to the substrate. This layer is formed via spin-coating. The strength of this interface effect is dependent on the solvent used.

    3. High Incident Photon-to-Current Conversion Efficiency of p-Type Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on NiO and Organic Chromophores (pages 2993–2996)

      Peng Qin, Mats Linder, Tore Brinck, Gerrit Boschloo, Anders Hagfeldt and Licheng Sun

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802461

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The synthesis and characterization of an organic dye, P4, together with its performance in p-type dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is presented. A solar-cell device based on P4 and an electrolyte that contains the I/I3 couple in acetonitrile yielded an IPCE value of 44% on a transparent NiO film only 1–1.4 μm thick, the highest value obtained so far.

    4. Chitosan-Based Inverse Opals: Three-Dimensional Scaffolds with Uniform Pore Structures for Cell Culture (pages 2997–3001)

      Sung-Wook Choi, Jingwei Xie and Younan Xia

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803504

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chitosan inverse opal scaffolds: Three-dimensional chitosan scaffolds with an inverse opal structure have been fabricated using a cubic close packed lattice of polymer beads as the template. The scaffolds have a uniform and interconnected pore structure as well as a fibrous morphology on the wall. They can be used as a model system for in vitro studies of cell culture and as clinically practical scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    5. Ultrahigh-Crystalline-Quality Silicon Pillars Formed by Millimeter-Wave Annealing of Amorphous Silicon on Glass (pages 3002–3006)

      Fude Liu, Kim M. Jones, Yueqin Xu, William Nemeth, John Lohr, Jeff Neilson, Manuel J. Romero, Mowafak M. Al-Jassim and David L. Young

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900157

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silicon pillars are formed by millisecond-long, single-pulse annealing of 110 GHz millimeter-wave radiation incident upon intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films deposited on glass by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. The image was taken at a sample tilt angle of 52° for a better 3D view.

    6. Self-Assembled Free-Standing Graphite Oxide Membrane (pages 3007–3011)

      Chengmeng Chen, Quan-Hong Yang, Yonggang Yang, Wei Lv, Yuefang Wen, Peng-Xiang Hou, Maozhang Wang and Hui-Ming Cheng

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803726

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Flexible, semi-transparent, and free-standing graphite oxide membranes are produced by a facile self-assembly process at the liquid/air interface, and the membranes are thickness controlled and area adjustable. Such macroscopic membranes are constructed from individual graphene oxide sheets by layer-by-layer stacking and show excellent mechanical and optical performance.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Self-Assembled Free-Standing Graphite Oxide Membrane

      Vol. 21, Issue 35, Article first published online: 15 SEP 2009

    7. Fabrication of Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals Using Multibeam Interference Lithography and Electrodeposition (pages 3012–3015)

      Masao Miyake, Ying-Chieh Chen, Paul V. Braun and Pierre Wiltzius

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802085

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-quality 3D photonic crystals are fabricated through electrodeposition into a polymer template created by multibeam interference lithography. Complete infilling of the template is achieved through electrodeposition of Cu2O, and subsequent etching of the template results in a Cu2O/air photonic crystal with the exact inverse structure of the template (see figure). The resultant photonic crystal shows a high peak reflectance at theoretically predicted wavelength.

    8. Metallic Nanoparticle Network for Photocurrent Generation and Photodetection (pages 3016–3021)

      Xian Ning Xie, Yilin Xie, Xingyu Gao, Chorng Haur Sow and Andrew Thye Shen Wee

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900249

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The generation and conduction of photoelectrons in ligated metallic Au NPs are demonstrated, and their key factors include tunneling of photoexcited electrons, the close packing of the NP network, and increased photoelectron-to-intrinsic electron ratio associated with ligand passivation. In view of their inherent characteristics, metallic NPs may provide a promising alternative to semiconductors in photocurrent and photodetection applications.

  8. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    10. Corrections
    11. Index
    1. Improving the Hydrogen Reaction Kinetics of Complex Hydrides (pages 3023–3028)

      Jun Yang and Shinichi Hirano

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803323

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Numerous thermodynamically favorable but kinetically limited reactions exist in complex hydride composites for on-board PEMFC vehicle applications. Catalyst- doping, nanoconfinement, tailoring thermodynamic driving forces, and self-catalyzing by in situ product seeding as shown in the figure have been explored to improve reaction kinetics at temperatures closer to thermodynamically feasible. We discuss such schemes and their underlying mechanisms.

  9. Corrections

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    10. Corrections
    11. Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Manipulating Charges and Excitons within a Single-Host System to Accomplish Efficiency/CRI/Color-Stability Trade-off for High-Performance OWLEDs

      Qi Wang, Junqiao Ding, Dongge Ma, Yanxiang Cheng, Lixiang Wang and Fosong Wang

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990115

      This article corrects:
    2. You have free access to this content
      Synthesis of Microspheres as Versatile Functional Scaffolds for Materials Science Applications

      Leonie Barner

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990116

      This article corrects:

      Synthesis of Microspheres as Versatile Functional Scaffolds for Materials Science Applications

      Vol. 21, Issue 24, 2547–2553, Article first published online: 12 MAY 2009

  10. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    10. Corrections
    11. Index

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION