Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 31

August 21, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 31

Pages 3133–3220

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Book Review
    8. Index
    1. Organic Lasers: The Development of Luminescent Concentrators for Pumping Organic Semiconductor Lasers (Adv. Mater. 31/2009)

      Ying Yang, Ifor D. W. Samuel and Graham A. Turnbull

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990120

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Graham Turnbull and co-workers report on p. 3205 that a luminescent concentrator based on a coumarin dye doped polymer film can be used to reduce the pumping threshold of polymer lasers. To achieve this effect, the edge of the luminescent concentrator is placed in contact with the surface of an MEH-PPV distributed feedback laser. Intense green fluorescence from the edge of the concentrator film is then used to pump the laser (the red laser emission can be seen at the left of the cover image).

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Book Review
    8. Index
    1. Magnetic Hydrogel Particles: Microfluidic Assembly of Magnetic Hydrogel Particles with Uniformly Anisotropic Structure (Adv. Mater. 31/2009)

      Chia-Hung Chen, Adam R. Abate, Daeyeon Lee, Eugene M. Terentjev and David A. Weitz

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990121

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The inside cover shows magnetic hydrogel particles with uniform anisotropic features, synthesized using double emulsions as templates, as reported by Adam Abate and co-workers on p.3201. Microfluidic assembly using flow-focusing double emulsion drop makers provides excellent control over the size, morphology, and monodispersity of the products. The particles exhibit excellent rotational control under an external field, with a possibility of eccentric rotation inducing a significant localized shear flow, and have promise for a variety of biomedical applications.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Book Review
    8. Index
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 31/2009) (pages 3133–3139)

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990122

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Book Review
    8. Index
    1. Solution Processing of Chalcogenide Semiconductors via Dimensional Reduction (pages 3141–3158)

      David B. Mitzi

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      One approach to improving the solubility of inorganic semiconductors for film deposition involves breaking up the extended framework into discrete anionic moieties, separated by small and volatile cationic species (so-called “dimensional reduction” of the inorganic framework), resulting in a soluble precursor. Using this approach and a reactive hydrazine solvent, high quality metal chalcogenide films are deposited for applications including thin-film transistors and solar cells.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Book Review
    8. Index
    1. Aqueous Stabilization and Self-Assembly of Graphene Sheets into Layered Bio-Nanocomposites using DNA (pages 3159–3164)

      Avinash J. Patil, Jemma L. Vickery, Thomas B. Scott and Stephen Mann

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803633

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stabilization of aqueous suspensions of graphene single sheets by single-stranded DNA is demonstrated using a range of physical methods. The negatively charged bio-functionalized graphene sheets are spontaneously assembled into layered hybrid nanocomposites containing intercalated DNA molecules, or co-intercalated mixtures of DNA and the redox protein, cytochrome c. Small-molecule reducing agents readily access the intercalated proteins.

    2. Thermally Induced Reversible Phase Transformations Accompanied by Emission Switching Between Different Colors of Two Aromatic-Amine Compounds (pages 3165–3169)

      Yunfeng Zhao, Hongze Gao, Yan Fan, Tianlei Zhou, Zhongmin Su, Yu Liu and Yue Wang

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803432

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thermally driven reversible emission switching between different colors and solid-phase transformation are investigated for two aromatic-amine compounds bearing trifluoromethyl (CF3) groups. The phase-dependent emission properties are attributed to the different molecular packing properties and changeable molecular geometry for different solid phases (see figure).

    3. Pulsed Vapor-Liquid-Solid Growth of Antimony Selenide and Antimony Sulfide Nanowires (pages 3170–3174)

      Ren Bin Yang, Julien Bachmann, Eckhard Pippel, Andreas Berger, Jörg Woltersdorf, Ulrich Gösele and Kornelius Nielsch

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803436

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Antimony sulfide and antimony selenide nanowires are prepared in an original pulsed vapor-liquid-solid growth mode. The molecular precursors are not mixed together in the gas phase; therefore the chemical reaction forming the solid only occurs in the gold catalyst. The material is stoichiometric and highly crystalline. Wires consisting of Sb2S3 and Sb2Se3 segments can be obtained with the same process.

    4. SERS-Coded Gold Nanorods as a Multifunctional Platform for Densely Multiplexed Near-Infrared Imaging and Photothermal Heating (pages 3175–3180)

      Geoffrey von Maltzahn, Andrea Centrone, Ji-Ho Park, Renuka Ramanathan, Michael J. Sailor, T. Alan Hatton and Sangeeta N. Bhatia

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803464

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Screening nanorods coated with a mixture of SERS active molecules and biocompatible polymer identifies three formulations that may be uniquely distinguished in vivo over a spectral bandwidth of only 6 nm in the near-infrared (a spectral multiplexing density over an order of magnitude greater than attainable with semiconductor quantum dots, organic fluorochromes, and Raleigh scattering nanoparticle imaging approaches), while providing intense photothermal heating for cancer therapy.

    5. Luminescent Solar Concentrators Employing Phycobilisomes (pages 3181–3185)

      Carlijn L. Mulder, Luke Theogarajan, Michael Currie, Jonathan K. Mapel, Marc A. Baldo, Michael Vaughn, Paul Willard, Barry D. Bruce, Mark W. Moss, Clifford E. McLain and John P. Morseman

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900148

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Phycobilisome-based luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) take advantage of the photosynthetic antenna complexes of red algae and cyanobacteria. The phycobilisomes are successfully stabilized in a solid-state LSC matrix with minimal loss of performance. Comparison of samples with intact and decoupled complexes indicates that energy transfer within intact phycobilisomes results in a reduction of re-absorption losses by ∼50%.

    6. Dual Templating Synthesis of Mesoporous Titanium Nitride Microspheres (pages 3186–3190)

      Jin Ho Bang and Kenneth S. Suslick

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802309

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hierarchically nanostructured titanium nitride is prepared via a novel and facile in situ dual templating approach. No prestructured templates are necessary; instead, a template is generated in situ during the synthesis from a liquid core and the resulting spherical shell, and the template is removed in the final heating without any additional chemical etching.

    7. Composites of Graphene with Large Aromatic Molecules (pages 3191–3195)

      Qi Su, Shuping Pang, Vajiheh Alijani, Chen Li, Xinliang Feng and Klaus Müllen

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803808

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel approach to functionalize graphene with large aromatic donor and acceptor molecules consisting of nanographene units is presented, producing an unprecedented class of graphene and nanographene composites with tunable electronic properties. The stability of aqueous dispersion of graphene sheets is greatly enhanced, and a large number of monolayer and double-layer graphene sheets could be facilely fabricated on the substrates

    8. Binary-Phased Nanoparticles for Enhanced Thermoelectric Properties (pages 3196–3200)

      Wenwen Zhou, Jixin Zhu, Di Li, Huey Hoon Hng, Freddy Yin Chiang Boey, Jan Ma, Hua Zhang and Qingyu Yan

      Article first published online: 23 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900312

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Binary-phased PbTe-PtTe2 nanoparticles are synthesized by co-precipitation in a chemical process. These nanoparticles show much enhanced power factors as compared to that of pure PbTe nanoparticles, which may give impact on development of new types of highly efficient thermoelectric materials.

    9. Microfluidic Assembly of Magnetic Hydrogel Particles with Uniformly Anisotropic Structure (pages 3201–3204)

      Chia-Hung Chen, Adam R. Abate, Daeyeon Lee, Eugene M. Terentjev and David A. Weitz

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900499

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Monodisperse magnetic particles are templated from double emulsions formed using sequential flow-focus drop formation. The microfluidic drop formation allows the particles to be formed with high monodispersity and with consistently anisotropic internal structure. This structural anisotropy gives rise to magnetic anisotropy, allowing the particles to be rotated by a magnetic field.

    10. The Development of Luminescent Concentrators for Pumping Organic Semiconductor Lasers (pages 3205–3209)

      Ying Yang, Ifor D. W. Samuel and Graham A. Turnbull

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900489

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A luminescent concentrator, based on coumarin dye doped polymer film, is used to reduce the pumping threshold of polymer lasers. The edge of the luminescent concentrator is placed in contact with the surface of an MEH-PPV distributed feedback laser. Intense green fluorescence from the edge of the concentrator film pumps the laser (red laser emission shown on left).

    11. Ultrasmooth, Large-Area, High-Uniformity, Conductive Transparent Single-Walled-Carbon-Nanotube Films for Photovoltaics Produced by Ultrasonic Spraying (pages 3210–3216)

      Robert C. Tenent, Teresa M. Barnes, Jeremy D. Bergeson, Andrew J. Ferguson, Bobby To, Lynn M. Gedvilas, Michael J. Heben and Jeffrey L. Blackburn

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803551

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Single-walled-carbon-nanotube (SWNT) films are prepared with high transparency, electrical conductivity, and uniformity, with exceptionally low surface roughness, on arbitrarily large substrates by ultrasonic spraying. This scalable process is ideally suited for large-area, solution-based production of SWNT electrodes for photovoltaics and other optoelectronic applications.

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Book Review
    8. Index
    1. Relativistic Quantum Chemistry : The Fundamental Theory of Molecular Science (page 3217)

      Lucas Visscher

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901821

  7. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Book Review
    8. Index
    1. Author Index and Subject Index Adv. Mater. 31/2009 (pages 3219–3220)

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990123

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