Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 32‐33

September 4, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 32-33

Pages 3225–3431

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
    1. Regenerative Medicine: (Adv. Mater. 32-33/2009)

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990124

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biomaterials are essential “elements” in Regenerative Medicine strategies. The role of such smart polymer systems (center left) is to support or control the endogenous regeneration for a specific duration and therefore are designed to degrade (upper left), to control cell function (lower right), substitute the extracellular matrix (background), or to control the sustained release of bioactive molecules (upper right).

      Images in the front cover courtesy of Andreas Lendlein, Dieter Hofmann, Anna Marie Lipski, Michael Schossig, Jay C. Sy, and V. Prasad Shastri.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
    1. Tissue Engineering: Advanced Material Strategies for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds (Adv. Mater. 32-33/2009)

      Lisa E. Freed, George C. Engelmayr Jr., Jeffrey T. Borenstein, Franklin T. Moutos and Farshid Guilak

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990125

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      The inside cover shows a scanning electron microscopy image of an accordion-like honeycomb scaffold for myocardial tissue engineering that was explicitly designed to match the structural and mechanical properties of native heart. Further details can be found in the article on p. 3410 by Lisa Freed, George Engelmayr, and co-workers.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 32-33/2009) (pages 3225–3230)

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990126

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
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      Materials in Regenerative Medicine (pages 3231–3234)

      V. Prasad Shastri and Andreas Lendlein

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902200

  5. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
    1. Perspectives and Challenges in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (pages 3235–3236)

      Robert Langer

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902589

      This Essay provides a concise overview on the achievements and future challenges in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  6. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
    1. Knowledge-Based Approach towards Hydrolytic Degradation of Polymer-Based Biomaterials (pages 3237–3245)

      Dieter Hofmann, Maria Entrialgo-Castaño, Karl Kratz and Andreas Lendlein

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802213

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      The reliable predictability of their degradation behavior is essential for the applicability of polymeric biomaterials in long-term and designed-to-degrade implants. In this Progress Report article a knowledge-based approach towards hydrolytic degradation is presented. This research strategy is supported by the introduction of computational methods and an experimental system for investigating macromolecule hydrolysis in monolayers. The figure shows a PLLA bulk model swollen with 7 wt % water.

  7. Progress Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
    1. In vivo Engineering of Tissues: Biological Considerations, Challenges, Strategies, and Future Directions (pages 3246–3254)

      V. Prasad Shastri

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900608

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      Engineered, bioresponsive materials are expected to significantly impact the development of new regenerative therapies. The development of such materials requires understanding of the impact of biomaterial variables on the cellular microenvironment. Here, the various biomolecular signals associated with a cellular environment are discussed and, using current examples, the design of highly responsive, biofunctional materials for in vivo tissue engineering is elucidated. Image courtesy of Anna Marie Lipski.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: In vivo Engineering of Tissues: Biological Considerations, Challenges, Strategies, and Future Directions

      Vol. 21, Issue 41, Article first published online: 26 OCT 2009

    2. Artificial Stem Cell Niches (pages 3255–3268)

      Matthias P. Lutolf and Helen M. Blau

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802582

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      Adult stem cells retain their unique functions of self-renewal and differentiation only if they are in intimate contact with a multifactorial instructive microenvironment, termed stem cell niche. This progress report provides a perspective on how advanced materials technologies can be employed to engineer “artificial niches” with the potential to impact both fundamental biology and tissue engineering.

  8. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
    1. Controlled Growth Factor Delivery for Tissue Engineering (pages 3269–3285)

      Prakriti Tayalia and David J. Mooney

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900241

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      Polymeric delivery systems promise to enhance the utility of exogenous growth factors in tissue engineering and regeneration. Growth factors are typically immobilized within degradable polymers, such as the alginate gel shown in this atomic force microscopy image, and subsequently released via diffusion and polymer degradation. Their subsequent action is highly dependent on the cellular microenvironment.

  9. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
    1. Delivery of Nucleic Acids via Disulfide-Based Carrier Systems (pages 3286–3306)

      Sonja Bauhuber, Constantin Hozsa, Miriam Breunig and Achim Göpferich

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802453

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      Materials containing disulfide bonds are very promising for the delivery of nucleic acids into cells, because they exploit the redox gradient between the extra- and intracellular compartment. This review gives an overview of the biological rationale for the synthesis of redox-sensitive, disulfide-based carrier systems. In particular, the basic synthesis approaches for introducing disulfide bonds into carrier molecules are presented.

  10. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
    1. Hydrogels in Regenerative Medicine (pages 3307–3329)

      Brandon V. Slaughter, Shahana S. Khurshid, Omar Z. Fisher, Ali Khademhosseini and Nicholas A. Peppas

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802106

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      Applications of hydrogels in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are reviewed. Physical properties of gels, synthesis methods from synthetic and natural monomers and macromers, and design considerations including vascularization and biocompatibility are specifically highlighted. Emerging techniques to microengineer hydrogels for increased tissue scaffold complexity are also discussed.

    2. Scaffold Design and Manufacturing: From Concept to Clinic (pages 3330–3342)

      Scott J. Hollister

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802977

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      Tissue engineering utilizes biomaterial scaffolds delivering cells, genes, and/or proteins to regenerate normal tissues. Although a number of new scaffolding biomaterials have been developed, they have had virtually no impact on clinical practice, which would require the integration of clinical insight, definition of native-tissue function, computational design, and biomaterial manufacturing, as illustrated to bring scaffolds from “Concept to Clinic”.

  11. Progress Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
    1. Progress in the Field of Electrospinning for Tissue Engineering Applications (pages 3343–3351)

      Seema Agarwal, Joachim H. Wendorff and Andreas Greiner

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803092

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      Progress concerning the use of electrospinning for TE applications has advanced impressively. Different issues such as cell penetration, incorporation of growth and differentiating factors, toxicity of solvents used, productivity, functional gradient, etc. are main points of current considerations, and are discussed here in addition to progress in this field.

    2. Potential and Bottlenecks of Bioreactors in 3D Cell Culture and Tissue Manufacturing (pages 3352–3367)

      David Wendt, Stefania A. Riboldi, Margherita Cioffi and Ivan Martin

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802748

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      Bioreactors can play vital roles within different phases of tissue engineering, in particular by i) initiating, maintaining, and directing cell growth within 3D porous biomaterials, ii) establishing advanced 3D cell-culture models to address fundamental scientific questions in basic research, and iii) automating, controlling, and standardizing the manufacture of engineered grafts for clinical applications.

  12. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
    1. Injectable Biomaterials for Regenerating Complex Craniofacial Tissues (pages 3368–3393)

      James D. Kretlow, Simon Young, Leda Klouda, Mark Wong and Antonios G. Mikos

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802009

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Regenerating complex tissues, such as the vascularized bone pictured, is a challenging task. Injectable scaffolds for tissue engineering applications are a promising tool to deliver cells and bioactive factors to complex three-dimensional defects by means of a minimally invasive technique. This Review outlines the use of injectable materials in tissue engineering within the context of regenerating a complex craniofacial defect.

  13. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
    1. Polymer Networks Combining Controlled Drug Release, Biodegradation, and Shape Memory Capability (pages 3394–3398)

      Axel T. Neffe, Bui D. Hanh, Susi Steuer and Andreas Lendlein

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802333

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A triple functional polymer network system that combines shape-memory capability, biodegradability, and drug release is developed. The choice of network structure and switching segment prevent that drug incorporation substantially changes the thermal and mechanical properties as well as the shape-memory functionality (see recovery curves). A diffusion-controlled release that is independent from biodegradation is enabled.

    2. Aldehyde-Amine Chemistry Enables Modulated Biosealants with Tissue-Specific Adhesion (pages 3399–3403)

      Natalie Artzi, Tarek Shazly, Aaron B. Baker, Adriana Bon and Elazer R. Edelman

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900340

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The interfacial regions between PEG: dextran-based adhesive sealant and excised rat heart, lung, liver, and duodenum tissues exhibit three distinct domains; target tissue (red and blue), bulk material (green), and an adhesive regime interposed between the two. The variation in adhesive regime morphology when applied to different tissues provides a rational approach for the engineering of application-specific surgical sealants.

  14. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Essay
    7. Progress Report
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Review
    10. Review Article
    11. Reviews
    12. Progress Reports
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Research News
    1. Tissue Engineering Using Laminar Cellular Assemblies (pages 3404–3409)

      Joseph Yang, Masayuki Yamato, Hidekazu Sekine, Sachiko Sekiya, Yukiko Tsuda, Kazuo Ohashi, Tatsuya Shimizu and Teruo Okano

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801990

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      Tissue engineering is currently considered a promising potential alternative to organ transplantation for the treatment of damaged or diseased tissues. In contrast to methods that combine the use of biodegradable scaffolds or extrinsic extracellular matrix components with seeded cells, we have developed cell-sheet engineering that uses laminar cellular assemblies for the reconstruction of cell-dense functional tissues.

    2. Advanced Material Strategies for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds (pages 3410–3418)

      Lisa E. Freed, George C. Engelmayr Jr., Jeffrey T. Borenstein, Franklin T. Moutos and Farshid Guilak

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900303

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      This Research News article highlights advanced material strategies reported to improve the function of tissue-engineered cartilage and myocardium, such as microfabricated and 3D woven scaffolds, as well as recent progress in microfluidic devices, which can potentially serve as tissue engineering scaffolds. We conclude with a perspective on how these strategies might be integrated toward bridging the remaining gaps between synthetic and naturally derived scaffold structures.

    3. The Elusive Path to Cartilage Regeneration (pages 3419–3424)

      Ernst B. Hunziker

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801957

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      Many attempts have been made to develop an efficacious cartilage-repair strategy for osteoarthritic lesions, but without much success. Investigators must themselves bare a share of the responsibility for these disappointing results: Historically, the problem has been tackled empirically rather than rationally and systematically. The state of the art in the field is surveyed and possible ways forward are suggested.

    4. Precision Polymers: Monodisperse, Monomer-Sequence-Defined Segments to Target Future Demands of Polymers in Medicine (pages 3425–3431)

      L. Hartmann and H. G. Börner

      Article first published online: 1 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801884

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      The sequential assembly of synthetic monomers from a library of building blocks leads to monodisperse polymer platforms. Such precision polymers allow for the accurate correlation of monomer sequence and (bio)properties, providing precisely adaptable model systems to deepen insight into interactions of polymers and biosystems.

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