Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 35

September 18, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 35

Pages 3537–3609

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Corrections
    1. Artificial Vasculature: Rapid Fabrication of Bio-inspired 3D Microfluidic Vascular Networks (Adv. Mater. 35/2009)

      Jen-Huang Huang, Jeongyun Kim, Nitin Agrawal, Arjun P. Sudarsan, Joseph E. Maxim, Arul Jayaraman and Victor M. Ugaz

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990132

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover depicts a 3D microchannel network embedded inside an acrylic polymer substrate. The network is created using an electrostatic discharge method that instantaneously vaporizes and fractures the substrate, leaving behind a tree-like fractal arrangement of microchannels bearing a remarkable similarity to naturally occurring vasculature. The ability to rapidly construct microchannel networks incorporating a wide range of diameters (∼10–500 µm) may help enable production of organ-sized engineered tissue scaffolds containing embedded vasculature, as reported by Arul Jayaraman, Victor Ugaz, and co-workers on p. 3567.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Corrections
    1. Organic Thin-Film Transistors: Controlling Nucleation and Crystallization in Solution-Processed Organic Semiconductors for Thin-Film Transistors (Adv. Mater. 35/2009)

      Stephanie S. Lee, Chang Su Kim, Enrique D. Gomez, Balaji Purushothaman, Michael F. Toney, Cheng Wang, Alexander Hexemer, John. E. Anthony and Yueh-Lin Loo

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990133

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      The grain size in solution-processed organic semiconductor thin films for TFTs can be tuned over a range of three orders of magnitude, report Yueh-Lin Loo and co-workers on p. 3605. The process involves the addition of fractional quantities of “impurities” that are capable of seeding the crystallization of the organic semiconductor, and the control thus exerted permitted studies that correlated increasing device mobility with increasing grain size.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Corrections
  4. Progress Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Corrections
    1. Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofluidic Transport (pages 3542–3550)

      Jason Knowles Holt

      Version of Record online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900867

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      Carbon nanotubes are ideal systems for studying nanoscale fluid flows, with their molecular dimensions and atomically precise structure. This Progress Report describes recent modeling and experimental advances in the field of fluid transport in carbon nanotubes. Molecular dynamics, analytical models, and recent experiments are providing key insights into transport in these systems and are enabling a host of new technologies.

    2. Challenges and Progress in High-Throughput Screening of Polymer Mechanical Properties by Indentation (pages 3551–3561)

      Johannes M. Kranenburg, Catherine A. Tweedie, Krystyn J. van Vliet and Ulrich S. Schubert

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803538

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The application of depth-sensing indentation to obtain the mechanical properties of polymers is reviewed, together with progress in high-throughput screening of the mechanical properties of polymers (see figure). As perfect matching of sample preparation and sample characterization is crucial for successful high-throughput screening, also the sample preparation and its possible effects on the obtained results are discussed.

  5. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Corrections
    1. (Adv. Mater. 35/2009)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990135

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Corrections
    1. Fast High-Temperature Response of Carbon Nanotube Film and Its Application as an Incandescent Display (pages 3563–3566)

      Peng Liu, Liang Liu, Yang Wei, Kai Liu, Zhuo Chen, Kaili Jiang, Qunqing Li and Shoushan Fan

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900473

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Super aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) film shows a fast high-temperature response: the film can be heated to incandescence and cools down in about 1 ms. Using screen printing and laser cutting, an incandescent CNT film array that can dynamically display Chinese characters is fabricated. More applications of the film may be developed based on its fast response.

    2. Rapid Fabrication of Bio-inspired 3D Microfluidic Vascular Networks (pages 3567–3571)

      Jen-Huang Huang, Jeongyun Kim, Nitin Agrawal, Arjun P. Sudarsan, Joseph E. Maxim, Arul Jayaraman and Victor M. Ugaz

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900584

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new method to embed branched 3D microvascular fluidic networks inside plastic substrates by harnessing electrostatic discharge phenomena is introduced. This nearly instantaneous process reproducibly generates highly branched tree-like microchannel architectures that bear remarkable similarity to naturally occurring vasculature. This method can be applied to a variety of polymers, and may help enable production of organ-sized tissue scaffolds containing embedded vasculature.

    3. High-Pressure, High-Temperature Formation of Phase-Pure Monoclinic Zirconia Nanocrystals Studied by Time-Resolved in situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction (pages 3572–3575)

      Martin Bremholm, Jacob Becker-Christensen and Bo Brummerstedt Iversen

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803431

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-pressure, high-temperature, time- resolved X-ray diffraction is used to study the gel formation of aqueous zirconium acetate, and the crystallization into phase-pure, monoclinic, anisotropic nanocrystals.

    4. Creating In-Plane Metallic-Nanowire Arrays by Corner-Mediated Electrodeposition (pages 3576–3580)

      Bo Zhang, Yu-Yan Weng, Xiao-Ping Huang, Mu Wang, Ru-Wen Peng, Nai-Ben Ming, Bingjie Yang, Nan Lu and Lifeng Chi

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900730

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      A novel template-assisted electrochemical approach to fabricate in-plane arrays of copper nanowires with tunable width varying from 25 nm to more than 200 nm, which is realized by successive nucleation of copper at the concave corner of the polymer template and the substrate, is reported. We demonstrate that this method can be applied for fabricating complicated structures.

    5. A One-Step Method for the Growth of Ga2O3-Nanorod-Based White-Light-Emitting Phosphors (pages 3581–3584)

      Sampathkumar Chrisolite Vanithakumari and Karuna Kar Nanda

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900072

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A one-step synthesis of Ga2O3 nanorods by heating molten gallium in ambient air at high temperatures is presented. The high-temperature synthesis creates oxygen vacancies and incorporates nitrogen from the environment. The oxygen vacancy in Ga2O3 is responsible for the emission in the blue–green region, while nitrogen in Ga2O3 is responsible for red emission.

  7. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Corrections
    1. (Adv. Mater. 35/2009)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990136

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Corrections
    1. Microstructured Surfaces Cause Severe but Non-Detrimental Deformation of the Cell Nucleus (pages 3586–3590)

      Patricia M. Davidson, Hayriye Özçelik, Vasif Hasirci, Günter Reiter and Karine Anselme

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900582

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Surface features on the length scale of organelles allow their manipulation. Here, we present observations of an unexpected deformation of nuclei within cells growing on surfaces with micrometer-sized pillars. Our results demonstrate that a microstructured surface can induce strong shape deformations in cells, without harmful consequences, and strongly suggest that these are limited to cancerous cells.

    2. The Effect of Stress Transfer Within Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Upon Their Ability to Reinforce Composites (pages 3591–3595)

      Shuang Cui, Ian A. Kinloch, Robert J. Young, Laure Noé and Marc Monthioux

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803683

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stress transfer within double-walled nanotubes (DWNTs) in a composite is followed from stress-induced Raman band shifts. It is shown that the Raman G′ band is split into two components, one from each wall. It is found that only the G′ component from the outer wall shifts with stress, and that this will limit the ability of multiwalled nanotubes to reinforce composites.

    3. Single-Component Molecular Conductor [Pt(tmdt)2] (tmdt = trimethylenetetrathiafulvalenedithiolate) – An Advanced Molecular Metal Exhibiting High Metallicity (pages 3596–3600)

      Biao Zhou, Akiko Kobayashi, Yoshinori Okano, Takeshi Nakashima, Shinobu Aoyagi, Eiji Nishibori, Makoto Sakata, Madoka Tokumoto and Hayao Kobayashi

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803116

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A newly prepared single-component molecular metal, [Pt(tmdt)2], exhibited very high conductivity and metallic behavior down to 4 K in the compacted polycrystalline state. A ‘conducting paint’ of [Pt(tmdt)2] obtained by kneading the microcrystals with lacquer and thinner showed metallic conductivity at around room temperature.

    4. A Stack of Functional Nanolayers for Simultaneous Emulsion Separation and Sensing (pages 3601–3604)

      Pagra Truman, Petra Uhlmann, Ralf Frenzel and Manfred Stamm

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803210

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel lab-on-a-chip device based on a stack of four nanolayers for emulsion separation and simultaneous detection is introduced. Emulsions are separated on top of chemically patterned surfaces while the process is monitored using semiconductor sensors.

    5. Controlling Nucleation and Crystallization in Solution-Processed Organic Semiconductors for Thin-Film Transistors (pages 3605–3609)

      Stephanie S. Lee, Chang Su Kim, Enrique D. Gomez, Balaji Purushothaman, Michael F. Toney, Cheng Wang, Alexander Hexemer, John. E. Anthony and Yueh-Lin Loo

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900705

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three orders of magnitude is the range over which the grain size (see figure) can be tuned in solution-processed organic semiconductor thin films for TFTs. Fluorinated triethylsilyl anthradithiophene (FTES-ADT) is added in fractional amounts to seed crystallization of TES-ADT. Correlation between device mobility and grain size in the active layer is described by a composite mobility model that assumes charge-carrier traps are located at grain boundaries.

  9. Corrections

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Corrections
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
      Self-Assembled Free-Standing Graphite Oxide Membrane

      Chengmeng Chen, Quan-Hong Yang, Yonggang Yang, Wei Lv, Yuefang Wen, Peng-Xiang Hou, Maozhang Wang and Hui-Ming Cheng

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990138

      This article corrects:

      Self-Assembled Free-Standing Graphite Oxide Membrane

      Vol. 21, Issue 29, 3007–3011, Version of Record online: 20 APR 2009

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