Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 42

November 13, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 42

Pages 4189–4291

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Correction
    1. Nanoscale Single-Crystal Circuits: Assembly of Nanoscale Organic Single-Crystal Cross-Wire Circuits (Adv. Mater. 42/2009)

      Qingxin Tang, Yanhong Tong, Wenping Hu, Qing Wan and Thomas Bjørnholm

      Version of Record online: 6 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990156

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic single-crystal circuits with versatile functions, such as inverters, NOR, and NAND gate, can be assembled by nanomechanical manipulation of nanowires of CuPc, F16CuPc and SnO2:Sb, report Thomas Bjornholm, Wenping Hu, and co-workers on p. 4234. The circuits show ultralow power consumption (40 pW per logic gate) and high voltage gain. In combination with generic “bottom-up” assembly methods developed for nanowires, this opens new opportunities in organic nanoelectronics and for highly sophisiticated integrated logic circuits

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Correction
    1. Soluble Graphene: Soluble Graphene: Generation of Aqueous Graphene Solutions Aided by a Perylenebisimide-Based Bolaamphiphile (Adv. Mater. 42/2009)

      Jan M. Englert, Jonas Röhrl, Cordula D. Schmidt, Ralf Graupner, Martin Hundhausen, Frank Hauke and Andreas Hirsch

      Version of Record online: 6 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990157

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Single-layer graphene (SLG) can be deposited onto Si/SiO2 substrates from aqueous dispersions using a scalable and quick detergent-based method that takes advantage of the availability and low cost of graphite as a feedstock, report Andreas Hirsch and co-workers on p. 4265. The deposits were analyzed using absorption and Raman spectroscopy and atomic force and optical microscopy. Evaluation of the two-phonon defect-induced Raman peak of individual particles on the substrate was then used to confirm exfoliation into graphene monolayers.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Correction
  4. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Correction
    1. Interface Engineering of Inorganic Thin-Film Solar Cells – Materials-Science Challenges for Advanced Physical Concepts (pages 4196–4206)

      Wolfram Jaegermann, Andreas Klein and Thomas Mayer

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802457

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thin-film solar-cell modules have reached efficiencies of >10% at production costs < 1 $ per Wp (peak-watt). The further advancement of compound semiconductor thin-film solar-cell technology requires improved control and thus a more-detailed understanding of interfaces, which determines not only the electronic properties but also film-growth processes and the resulting morphology and microstructure.

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Correction
    1. Synthesis of Inorganic Nanotubes (pages 4208–4233)

      C. N. R. Rao and Achutharao Govindaraj

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803720

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanotubes of a variety of inorganic materials have been synthesized in the last few years by employing several synthetic strategies such as solvothermal synthesis, use of templates, precursors, as well as some physical methods. This article presents a brief account of the present status of inorganic nanotubes synthesis.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Correction
    1. Assembly of Nanoscale Organic Single-Crystal Cross-Wire Circuits (pages 4234–4237)

      Qingxin Tang, Yanhong Tong, Wenping Hu, Qing Wan and Thomas Bjørnholm

      Version of Record online: 12 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901355

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic single-crystal transistors and circuits can be assembled by nanomechanical manipulation of nanowires of CuPc, F16CuPc, and SnO2:Sb. The crossed bar devices have low operational voltage, high mobility and are stable in air. They can be combined into circuits, providing varied functions including inverters and NOR and NAND logic gates, opening new opportunities for organic nanoelectronics and highly sophisticated integrated logic devices.

    2. Efficient Polymer Solar Cells with Thin Active Layers Based on Alternating Polyfluorene Copolymer/Fullerene Bulk Heterojunctions (pages 4238–4242)

      Mei-Hsin Chen, Jianhui Hou, Ziruo Hong, Guanwen Yang, Srinivas Sista, Li-Min Chen and Yang Yang

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900510

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Efficient (4.5% power conversion efficiency) polymer solar cells based on an alternating polyfluorene copolymer are demonstrated. The highest internal quantum efficiency obtained was 87%. The semi-transparent active layer (only 47 nm thick) shows the uniqueness of polymer solar cells and their unconventional applications, such as translucent solar windows for buildings and automobiles.

    3. Semiconductor-Dielectric Blends: A Facile All Solution Route to Flexible All-Organic Transistors (pages 4243–4248)

      Wi Hyoung Lee, Jung Ah Lim, Donghoon Kwak, Jeong Ho Cho, Hwa Sung Lee, Hyun Ho Choi and Kilwon Cho

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900277

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A one-step process for the production of all-organic, all-solution-processed field-effect transistors (FETs) can be achieved using triethylsilylethynyl anthradithiophene (TES-ADT). TES-ADT has a lower surface energy than poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), which results in a segregation and crystal formation of TES-ADT at the air–film interface after spin-casting and subsequent solvent annealing. The resulting FETs comprise vertically phase-separated semiconducting and dielectric layers and exhibit high performances.

    4. Surface Cell Growth Engineering Assisted by a Novel Bacterial Nanomaterial (pages 4249–4253)

      Elena García-Fruitós, Escarlata Rodríguez-Carmona, César Díez-Gil, Rosa M. Ferraz, Esther Vázquez, José Luis Corchero, Mary Cano-Sarabia, Imma Ratera, Nora Ventosa, Jaume Veciana and Antonio Villaverde

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900283

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bacterial inclusion bodies are intriguing nanoparticulate materials produced by biological systems in inexpensive processes whose nanometer-scale features can be finely tailored during biological production. This novel, mechanically stable, biocompatible nanomaterial is shown to be suitable for 2D cell growth engineering, among other potential biomedical applications.

    5. Reversible Switching of Water-Droplet Mobility on a Superhydrophobic Surface Based on a Phase Transition of a Side-Chain Liquid-Crystal Polymer (pages 4254–4258)

      Chao Li, Renwei Guo, Xi Jiang, Shuxin Hu, Lin Li, Xinyu Cao, Huai Yang, Yanlin Song, Yongmei Ma and Lei Jiang

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900903

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reversible switching of the mobility of a water microdroplet between rollable and pinned simply by changing the temperature is realized by coordination of the phase transition of a side-chain liquid-crystal polymer (SCLCP) with optimized surface roughness of a superhydrophobic surface. The responsive surface has potential applications in microreactor design and microfluidic control systems.

    6. Rewritable Photonic Paper with Hygroscopic Salt Solution as Ink (pages 4259–4264)

      Jianping Ge, James Goebl, Le He, Zhenda Lu and Yadong Yin

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901562

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Flexible photonic paper is fabricated through the instant magnetic assembly of Fe3O4@SiO2 colloids, followed by a rapid photopolymerization to fix the photonic structures inside the PEGDA matrix. Solutions of LiCl, MgCl2, or CaCl2 are used as inks to print durable letters and patterns with color contrast based on the local swelling of the polymer matrix. The photonic paper is rewritable and benign to the environment as the ink marks can simply be removed by washing with water.

    7. Soluble Graphene: Generation of Aqueous Graphene Solutions Aided by a Perylenebisimide-Based Bolaamphiphile (pages 4265–4269)

      Jan M. Englert, Jonas Röhrl, Cordula D. Schmidt, Ralf Graupner, Martin Hundhausen, Frank Hauke and Andreas Hirsch

      Version of Record online: 10 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901578

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Single-layer graphene (SLG) is deposited onto Si/SiO2 substrates from aqueous dispersions using a scalable and quick detergent-based method (see figure). The deposits are analyzed using absorption and Raman spectroscopy and atomic force and optical microscopy. Evaluation of the two-phonon defect-induced Raman peak of individual particles on the substrate is used to confirm exfoliation into graphene monolayers.

    8. Mesoporous, 2D Hexagonal Carbon Nitride and Titanium Nitride/Carbon Composites (pages 4270–4274)

      Young-Si Jun, Won Hi Hong, Markus Antonietti and Arne Thomas

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803500

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A multistep templating procedure is used to prepare graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) and titanium nitride/carbon composites with ordered, 2D hexagonal porosity. First, the carbon nitride is prepared by nanocasting using a silica (SBA-15) template. This carbon nitride is then replicated as a metal nitride carbon composite, using a simultaneous templating/conversion scheme (“reactive templating”).

    9. An Ethanol/O2 Biofuel Cell Based on an Electropolymerized Bilirubin Oxidase/Pt Nanoparticle Bioelectrocatalytic O2-Reduction Cathode (pages 4275–4279)

      Yi-Ming Yan, Ilina Baravik, Ran Tel-Vered and Itamar Willner

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900206

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An effective O2-reducing bioelectrocatalytic electrode is prepared by the electrochemical crosslinking of thioaniline-modified Pt nanoparticles (NPs) and thioaniline-functionalized bilirubin oxidase (BOD). An O2/ethanol biofuel cell element is constructed by integrating the Pt NP/BOD cathode and an electrically contacted alcohol dehydrogenase (AlcDH)-based anode.

    10. Thermomechanical and Thermal Contact Characteristics of Bismuth Telluride Films Electrodeposited on Carbon Nanotube Arrays (pages 4280–4283)

      Himanshu Mishra, Baratunde A. Cola, Vijay Rawat, Placidus B. Amama, Kalapi G. Biswas, Xianfan Xu, Timothy S. Fisher and Timothy D. Sands

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803705

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A scalable electrochemical process for addressing the thermomechanical compliance and contact resistance at metal/thermoelectric (M/TE) interfaces by integrating TE films with carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays is presented. Thermomechanical compliance and thermal contact characteristics of TE/CNT/M and TE/M contacts are compared. A process-flow for patterned electrodeposition of TE films on CNT arrays coated surfaces is also demonstrated.

    11. Shear Modulus of Polycrystalline Rhenium Diboride Determined from Surface Brillouin Spectroscopy (pages 4284–4286)

      Sergey N. Tkachev, Jonathan B. Levine, Alexander Kisliuk, Alexei P. Sokolov, Shuqi Guo, Justin T. Eng and Richard B. Kaner

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900232

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Surface Brillouin specotroscopy of a densified powder compact of rhenium diboride (see scanning electron microscopy image) results in a determined shear modulus of 223 GPa. This value is comparable to the shear modulus of c-BC2N and provides evidence for the superhard nature of ReB2.

    12. High-Mobility Nonvolatile Memory Thin-Film Transistors with a Ferroelectric Polymer Interfacing ZnO and Pentacene Channels (pages 4287–4291)

      Kwang H. Lee, Gyubaek Lee, Kimoon Lee, Min Suk Oh, Seongil Im and Sung-Min Yoon

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900398

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nonvolatile memory ferroelectric thin-film transistors (FeTFT) with P(VDF-TrFE) polymer are demonstrated with both n-channel ZnO and p-channel pentacene. A high mobility of ≈1 cm2 V−1 s−1 and large memory window of ≈20 V are achieved through the organic ferroelectric– inorganic channel hybrid device of ZnO-FeTFT. WRITE/ERASE states are clearly distinguished by ±20 V switching for ZnO- and pentacene-FeTFTs.

  7. Correction

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Correction
    1. You have free access to this content
      Highly Efficient and Color-Stable Deep-Blue Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Based on a Solution-Processible Dendrimer

      Lei Wang, Yang Jiang, Jia Luo, Yan Zhou, Junhong Zhou, Jian Wang, Jian Pei and Yong Cao

      Version of Record online: 6 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990159

      This article corrects:

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION