Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 43

November 20, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 43

Pages 4297–4408

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    1. Nerve Repair: A Conducting-Polymer Platform with Biodegradable Fibers for Stimulation and Guidance of Axonal Growth (Adv. Mater. 43/2009)

      Anita F. Quigley, Joselito M. Razal, Brianna C. Thompson, Simon E. Moulton, Magdalena Kita, Elizabeth L. Kennedy, Graeme M. Clark, Gordon G. Wallace and Robert M. I. Kapsa

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990160

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Effective functional innervation of medical bionic devices, as well as re-innervation of target tissue in nerve and spinal cord injuries, requires a platform that can stimulate and orientate neural growth. Gordon Wallace and co-workers report on p. 4393 that conducting and nonconducting biodegradable polymers show excellent potential as suitable hybrid substrata for neural regeneration and may form the basis of electrically active conduits designed to accelerate nerve repair.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    1. Expanded Graphite: One-Step Exfoliation Synthesis of Easily Soluble Graphite and Transparent Conducting Graphene Sheets (Adv. Mater. 43/2009)

      Jong Hak Lee, Dong Wook Shin, Victor G. Makotchenko, Albert S. Nazarov, Vladimir E. Fedorov, Yu Hee Kim, Jae-Young Choi, Jong Min Kim and Ji-Beom Yoo

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990161

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The inside cover shows an SEM image of easily soluble expanded graphite (ESEG) on a Si substrate. In work by Ji-Beom Yoo and co-workers (p. 4383) the ESEG was prepared from a fluorinated graphite intercalation compound (FGIC)–C2F · nClF3. The inset scheme shows the fluorinated graphite intercalation compound. Due to the severe expansion state, the ESEG can be dispersed in organic solvents or even water by ultrasonication with common surfactants.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 43/2009) (pages 4297–4302)

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990162

  4. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    1. Progress with Molecular Electronic Junctions: Meeting Experimental Challenges in Design and Fabrication (pages 4303–4322)

      Richard L. McCreery and Adam Johan Bergren

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802850

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Incorporating molecules into electronic devices is a promising strategy for adding new functions and performance into microelectronics. However, progress in molecular electronics remains beset by a multitude of challenges. This progress report identifies some recent advances in the field and suggests several areas that require further work in order to meet targeted objectives. The figure depicts molecular junctions made using diazonium-derived layers on pyrolyzed photoresist film (PPF), shown with their current-density-potential (J-V) curves.

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    1. The Quest for Nanoscale Magnets: The example of [Mn12] Single Molecule Magnets (pages 4323–4333)

      Guillaume Rogez, Bertrand Donnio, Emmanuel Terazzi, Jean-Louis Gallani, Jean-Paul Kappler, Jean-Pierre Bucher and Marc Drillon

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200803020

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent advances on the organization of [Mn12] “single molecule magnets” (SMMs) on a surface or in 3D are reviewed. It is shown that μ-SQUID, the magneto-optical Kerr effect, or magnetic optical circular dichroism enable the characterization of SMM nanostructures with exceptional sensitivity. Furthermore, the spin-polarized version of the STM under ultrahigh vacuum is shown to be the key tool for addressing SMMs.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Correction: The Quest for Nanoscale Magnets: The example of [Mn12] Single Molecule Magnets

      Vol. 22, Issue 14, Article first published online: 12 APR 2010

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    1. One-Step Direct-Patterning Template Utilizing Self-Assembly of POSS-Containing Block Copolymers (pages 4334–4338)

      Tomoyasu Hirai, Melvina Leolukman, Chi Chun Liu, Eungnak Han, Yun Jun Kim, Yoshihito Ishida, Teruaki Hayakawa, Masa-aki Kakimoto, Paul F. Nealey and Padma Gopalan

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900518

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We report the self-assembly of organic-inorganic block copolymers (BCP) in thin-films by simple solvent annealing on unmodified substrates. The resulting vertically oriented lamellae and cylinders are converted to a hard silica mask by a single step highly selective oxygen plasma etching. The size of the resulting nanostructures in the case of cylinders is less than 10 nm.

    2. Smart Drug-Loaded Polymer Gold Nanoshells for Systemic and Localized Therapy of Human Epithelial Cancer (pages 4339–4342)

      Jaemoon Yang, Jaewon Lee, Jinyoung Kang, Seung Jae Oh, Hyun-Ju Ko, Joo-Hiuk Son, Kwangyeol Lee, Jin-Suck Suh, Yong-Min Huh and Seungjoo Haam

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900334

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Near-infrared-light-sensitive multifunctional smart drug-loaded polymer gold nanoshells are fabricated as advanced prototypes, composed of chemotherapeutic agents (therapeutic antibody and anticancer drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles) for systemic chemotherapy of human epithelial cancer and a polymer-based gold nanoshell for localized photothermal treatment by NIR light.

    3. Thin-Film Fabrication Method for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Electrospray Deposition (pages 4343–4347)

      Jungmyoung Ju, Yutaka Yamagata and Toshiro Higuchi

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900444

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new method for fabricating micropatterns of MEH-PPV thin films with surface roughnesses below 1nm is proposed, using electrospray deposition and a dual-solvent technique. The basic concept is that nanoparticles are deposited on the target substrate just before they become completely dry, by adding a solvent that has an evaporation speed relatively lower than that of the original solution.

    4. Click-Engineered, Bioresponsive, Drug-Loaded PEG Spheres (pages 4348–4352)

      Heng Pho Yap, Angus P. R. Johnston, Georgina K. Such, Yan Yan and Frank Caruso

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900421

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A click-chemistry approach to synthesize bioresponsive poly(ethylene glycol acrylate) particles is described. The particles are loaded with a model anticancer drug (doxorubicin, DOX), and undergo simultaneous particle deconstruction and DOX release upon specific activation by the simulated environment of the cellular cytoplasm.

    5. Shielding Nanowires and Nanotubes with Imogolite: A Route to Nanocables (pages 4353–4356)

      Agnieszka Kuc and Thomas Heine

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901172

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The use of an imogolite (aluminosilicate) sheath to protect a conducting core consisting of a carbon nanotube (CNT) or nanowire from mechanical and chemical attacks is proposed. The cross-sectional structure of such a nanocable is shown in the figure. The most stable CNT@ imogolite nanocable is calculated to have a tube–tube distance of 2.8 Å and an insertion energy of ca. 60 meV per carbon atom.

    6. Macroscopic Single-Walled-Carbon-Nanotube Fiber Self-Assembled by Dip-Coating Method (pages 4357–4361)

      Eui Yun Jang, Tae June Kang, Hyeongwook Im, Seung Jae Baek, Seongyong Kim, Dae Hong Jeong, Yung Woo Park and Yong Hyup Kim

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900480

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pure macroscopic single-walled-carbon-nanotube (SWNT) fibers are fabricated by using a dip-coating method without any additive or additional electrical equipment or complex apparatus. The present method only utilizes microfluidics, which includes capillary condensation, capillary flow, and surface tension, and results in the self-assembly and self-alignment of SWNT colloids.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Correction: Macroscopic Single-Walled-Carbon-Nanotube Fiber Self-Assembled by Dip-Coating Method

      Vol. 22, Issue 14, Article first published online: 12 APR 2010

    7. Fabrication of Reactivated Biointerface for Dual-Controlled Reversible Immobilization of Cytochrome c (pages 4362–4365)

      Pengbo Wan, Yapei Wang, Yugui Jiang, Huaping Xu and Xi Zhang

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901237

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A light or pH dual-responsive reactivated biointerface is fabricated using of photocontrolled reversible inclusion and exclusion reactions between photoresponsive azobenzene-containing self-assembled monolayer and pH-responsive poly(acrylic acid) polymer grafted with cyclodextrins. The dual-controlled reactivated biointerface can be employed for reversible immobilization of redox protein–Cytochrome c, triggered by dual external stimuli-light and pH.

    8. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Zinc Phthalocyanine Loaded on Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns in Aqueous Solution (pages 4366–4371)

      Atula S. D. Sandanayaka, Osamu Ito, Minfang Zhang, Kumiko Ajima, Sumio Iijima, Masako Yudasaka, Tatsuya Murakami and Kunihiro Tsuchida

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901256

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Notable electronic communication within ZnPc-SWNHox nanoensembles, where ZnPc is zinc phthalocyanine and SWNHox is an oxidized single-walled nanohorn, in both the ground and excited states is revealed by steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. The details of electron transfer reported here with time-resolved absorption and fluorescence measurements may broaden the use of SWNHox nanoensembles in photochemistry and photobiology.

    9. Chemical-to-Electrical-Signal Transduction Synchronized with Smart Gel Volume Phase Transition (pages 4372–4378)

      Akira Matsumoto, Naoko Sato, Toshiya Sakata, Ryo Yoshida, Kazunori Kataoka and Yuji Miyahara

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900693

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A stimulus-responsive polymer gel designed on a field-effect transistor gate undergoes a reversible volume phase transition in response to a specific biomolecule. An abrupt permittivity change at the gel/gate interface during the transition gives rise to a chemical to electrical signal conversion; the signal is thus detectable via a transistor without the limit of the Debye length.

    10. Active Control of Epithelial Cell-Density Gradients Grown Along the Channel of an Organic Electrochemical Transistor (pages 4379–4382)

      Maria H. Bolin, Karl Svennersten, David Nilsson, Anurak Sawatdee, Edwin W. H. Jager, Agneta Richter-Dahlfors and Magnus Berggren

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901191

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Complex patterning of the extracellular matrix, cells, and tissues under in situ electronic control is the aim of the technique presented here. The distribution of epithelial cells along the channel of an organic electrochemical transistor is shown to be actively controlled by the gate and drain voltages, as electrochemical gradients are formed along the transistor channel when the device is biased..

    11. One-Step Exfoliation Synthesis of Easily Soluble Graphite and Transparent Conducting Graphene Sheets (pages 4383–4387)

      Jong Hak Lee, Dong Wook Shin, Victor G. Makotchenko, Albert S. Nazarov, Vladimir E. Fedorov, Yu Hee Kim, Jae-Young Choi, Jong Min Kim and Ji-Beom Yoo

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900726

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Easily soluble expanded graphite (see figure) is synthesized in a one-step exfoliation process that can be used for the lowcost mass production of graphene for various applications because of the simplicity and speed of the process. The graphene obtained is sufficiently expanded to be dispersed in aqueous solutions with an ordinary surfactant and in organic solvents.

    12. Free-Standing Biodegradable Poly(lactic acid) Nanosheet for Sealing Operations in Surgery (pages 4388–4392)

      Yosuke Okamura, Koki Kabata, Manabu Kinoshita, Daizoh Saitoh and Shinji Takeoka

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901035

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A free-standing biodegradable nanosheet composed of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was shown to have excellent sealing efficacy for a gastric incision as a novel wound dressing material that did not require adhesive agents, and the PLLA nanosheet-induced wound repair showed neither scars nor tissue adhesion. This material may, therefore, be an ideal alternative to conventional tissue repairing procedures using suture/ligation in surgery.

    13. A Conducting-Polymer Platform with Biodegradable Fibers for Stimulation and Guidance of Axonal Growth (pages 4393–4397)

      Anita F. Quigley, Joselito M. Razal, Brianna C. Thompson, Simon E. Moulton, Magdalena Kita, Elizabeth L. Kennedy, Graeme M. Clark, Gordon G. Wallace and Robert M. I. Kapsa

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901165

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A biosynthetic platform composed of a conducting polypyrrole sheet embedded with unidirectional biodegradable polymer fibers is described (see image; scale bar = 50 µm). Such hybrid systems can promote rapid directional nerve growth for neuro-regenerative scaffolds and act as interfaces between the electronic circuitry of medical bionic devices and the nervous system.

    14. Device Performance of APFO-3/PCBM Solar Cells with Controlled Morphology (pages 4398–4403)

      Cecilia M. Björström Svanström, Jakub Rysz, Andrzej Bernasik, Andrzej Budkowski, Fengling Zhang, Olle Inganäs, Mats R. Andersson, Kjell O. Magnusson, Jessica J. Benson-Smith, Jenny Nelson and Ellen Moons

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900754

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymer/fullerene solar cells with three different device structures: A) diffuse bilayer, B) spontaneously formed multilayer, and C) vertically homogenous thin films, are fabricated. The photocurrent/voltage performance is compared and it is found that the self-stratified structure (B) yields the highest energy conversion efficiency.

    15. Localized Attachment of Carbon Nanotubes in Microelectronic Structures (pages 4404–4408)

      Xavier Joyeux, Paolo Mangiagalli and Jean Pinson

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900121

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are covalently modified by the monodiadozium salt of ethylene dianiline; further diazotation of the free amino group permits the selective attachment of these CNTs to the Si or Ti bottom of SiO2 trenches. The symmetrical electrografting of the bottom of the trenches, followed by the attachment of pristine CNTs, is also described.

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