Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 45

December 4, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 45

Pages 4517–4657

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Reviews
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Research News
    1. Institute of Physics, CAS: (Adv. Mater. 45/2009)

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990166

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      Founded in 1928, the Institute of Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has become one of China's leading research institutions. In 2003, the Institute acquired the Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, one of the first six national laboratories in China. Its current programs focus on condensed matter physics and its theory, optical physics, atomic and molecular physics, soft matter, plasma physics, and computational physics.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Reviews
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Research News
    1. Self-Assembly of Ordered Patterns: Stressed Triangular Tessellations and Fibonacci Parastichous Spirals on Ag Core/SiO2 Shell Microstructures (Adv. Mater. 45/2009)

      Chao-Rong Li, Ai-Ling Ji, Lei Gao and Ze-Xian Cao

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990167

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      Stress engineering offers an effective route for self-assembly of ordered patterns. By stressing Ag core/SiO2 shell microstructures, spontaneous occurrence of triangular tessellations and Fibonacci parastichous spirals can be observed on the spherical and conical cores and shells, respectively. On p. 4652, Ze-Xian Cao and co-workers demonstrate that the stressed patterns are an immediate response to the geometry of the shrinking core/shells. The reproduction of Fibonacci spirals, ubiquitous in the world of plants, on the surface of totally inorganic microstructures provides strong confirmation of the mechanical principle of phyllotaxis.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Reviews
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Research News
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 45/2009) (pages 4517–4521)

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990168

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Reviews
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Research News
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  5. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Reviews
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Research News
    1. Bulk Metallic Glasses with Functional Physical Properties (Adv. Mater. 45/2009)

      W. H. Wang

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990169

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  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Reviews
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Research News
    1. Bulk Metallic Glasses with Functional Physical Properties (pages 4524–4544)

      W. H. Wang

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901053

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      Bulk metallic glasses with unique functional properties are of interest, not only for basic research, but also for technological applications. In this review, we report on the formation of a variety of novel metallic glassy materials that could have applications as functional materials. The work has implications in the search for novel metallic glasses with unique functional properties such as molding under hot water (see figure), for advancing our understanding of the nature and formation of glasses, and for extending their applications.

    2. Recent Progress in Exploring Magnetocaloric Materials (pages 4545–4564)

      B. G. Shen, J. R. Sun, F. X. Hu, H. W. Zhang and Z. H. Cheng

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901072

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      Recent progress in the study of the magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effects (MCEs) of the LaFe13−xSix-based compounds, which have large MCEs over a wide temperature range near room temperature, is reviewed. The effects of magnetic rare-earth doping, interstitial atoms and high pressure on the magnetic exchange, entropy change, and magnetic hysteresis are discussed. The applicability of the giant MCE materials to the magnetic refrigeration near ambient temperature is evaluated.

    3. Synthesis, Structure, and Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (pages 4565–4583)

      Weiya Zhou, Xuedong Bai, Enge Wang and Sishen Xie

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901071

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      Recent progress on the synthesis, structure, and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), especially progress regarding the SWCNT non-woven film, SWCNT rings (see figure), boron–nitrogen co-doped SWCNTs, and individual SWCNT is highlighted in this Review, with special forcus on the controlled preparation and understanding of intrinsic properties of SWCNTs. Some long-standing problems and topics warranting further investigations in the near future are addressed.

    4. Research and Prospects of Iron-Based Superconductors (pages 4584–4592)

      Zhi-An Ren and Zhong-Xian Zhao

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901049

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      A new family of high-Tc Fe-based superconductors is reviewed. New findings and basic experimental facts with regard to this class of high-Tc materials are discussed, including the various superconducting structures, the sample synthesizing methods, the physical properties of the parent compounds, the doping methods that produce superconductivity, the pressure effects, and the future prospects for this new high-Tc superconductor family.

    5. Research on Advanced Materials for Li-ion Batteries (pages 4593–4607)

      Hong Li, Zhaoxiang Wang, Liquan Chen and Xuejie Huang

      Article first published online: 14 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901710

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      Recent progress in anode and cathode materials for Li-ion batteries is reviewed. Nanostructured materials, size effects, and efforts on improving cyclic performance, thermal and chemical stability, and theoretical simulations are discussed.

  7. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Reviews
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Research News
    1. Self-Assembled Pb Nanostructures on Si(111) Surfaces: From Nanowires to Nanorings (Adv. Mater. 45/2009)

      Rui Wu, Yi Zhang, Feng Pan, Li-Li Wang, Xu-Cun Ma, Jin-Feng Jia and Qi-Kun Xue

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990170

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  8. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Reviews
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Research News
    1. Self-Assembled Pb Nanostructures on Si(111) Surfaces: From Nanowires to Nanorings (pages 4609–4613)

      Rui Wu, Yi Zhang, Feng Pan, Li-Li Wang, Xu-Cun Ma, Jin-Feng Jia and Qi-Kun Xue

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901063

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      Superconducting Pb nanorings and ordered arrays of super-long single-crystalline Pb nanowires (see figure) with atomic-level-controlled width, thickness (height), and surface location are prepared. The method involves deposition of Pb on a phase-separated striped (for nanowires), or island (for nanorings) pattern, which is composed of a Ge-rich incommensurate phase and a √3 × √3 phase on a Si substrate.

    2. Highly Surface-roughened “Flower-like” Silver Nanoparticles for Extremely Sensitive Substrates of Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (pages 4614–4618)

      Hongyan Liang, Zhipeng Li, Wenzhong Wang, Youshi Wu and Hongxing Xu

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901139

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      Monodispersed silver particles with a novel, highly roughened, “flower-like” morphology have been synthesized by reducing silver nitrate with ascorbic acid in aqueous solution. The nanometer-scale surface roughness of the particles can provide several “hot spots” on a single particle, which significantly increases the enhancement of surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    3. Structural and Magnetic Properties of Various Ferromagnetic Nanotubes (pages 4619–4624)

      Xiu-Feng Han, Shahzadi Shamaila, Rehana Sharif, Jun-Yang Chen, Hai-Rui Liu and Dong-Ping Liu

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901065

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      Ferromagnetic nanotube arrays are fabricated by a simple electrodeposition process in porous alumina membranes and polycarbonate membranes with different diameters, wall thickness, and lengths. The structural, magnetic, and magnetization reversal properties of these nanotubes are reported and compared to those of nanowires. The angular dependence (see figure) of the coercivity indicates a transition from a curling to a coherent mode for ferromagnetic nanotubes.

    4. Controlled Growth of High-Quality ZnO-Based Films and Fabrication of Visible-Blind and Solar-Blind Ultra-Violet Detectors (pages 4625–4630)

      Xiaolong Du, Zengxia Mei, Zhanglong Liu, Yang Guo, Tianchong Zhang, Yaonan Hou, Ze Zhang, Qikun Xue and Andrej Yu Kuznetsov

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901108

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      Interface engineering plays a key role in growth of high-quality epitaxial films. This Research News article demonstrates the effects of AlN or MgO interfacial layers on establishing structural and chemical compatibility between ZnO-based epilayers and substrates. A visible-blind UV detector exploiting a double heterojunction of n-ZnO/insulator-MgO/p-Si and a solar-blind UV detector using MgZnO as an active layer are fabricated by using the growth techniques discussed here.

    5. Polar-Molecule-Dominated Electrorheological Fluids Featuring High Yield Stresses (pages 4631–4635)

      Rong Shen, Xuezhao Wang, Yang Lu, De Wang, Gang Sun, Zexian Cao and Kunquan Lu

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901062

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      Polar-molecule-dominated electrorheological effects arising from the alignment of polar molecules on particles under electrical field can bring forth shear yield strengths over 200 KPa, thus opening the possibility for the practical implementation of electrorheological fluids. In the current research news the preparation of this new kind of electrorheological fluid, its functioning mechanism, and the pretreatment of electrodes and the contrivance of new measuring procedures for characterization and application, are discussed.

    6. Novel Multifunctional Properties Induced by Interface Effects in Perovskite Oxide Heterostructures (pages 4636–4640)

      Kui-juan Jin, Hui-bin Lu, Kun Zhao, Chen Ge, Meng He and Guo-zhen Yang

      Article first published online: 12 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901046

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      The introduction of interfaces into perovskite oxides induces a series of novel properties. One of these is the very large enhancement of the lateral photovoltage of both La0.9Sr0.1MnO3/SrNb0.01Ti0.99O3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Si p–n heterostructures compared to that of the SrNb0.01 Ti0.99O3 and Si substrates (see figure). This effect and other characteristics of these heterostructures are explained in this research news article.

    7. Recent Progress in GaN-Based Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 4641–4646)

      Haiqiang Jia, Liwei Guo, Wenxin Wang and Hong Chen

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901349

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      Recently, tremendous progress has been achieved in GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as solid-state light sources. This article reviews our recent achievements: the first involves GaN lateral epitaxial overgrowth techniques to decrease dislocation densities; the second uses an asymmetrically coupled quantum well structure to increase the luminescent efficiency, and the third is a single-chip phosphor-free white LED.

    8. Towards Optimization of Materials for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 4647–4651)

      Yanhong Luo, Dongmei Li and Qingbo Meng

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901078

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      Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have attracted much attention as a new generation of photovoltaic devices. Recent progress in improving the efficiency and stability of DSCs is reviewed. In particular, some strategies for optimization of the component materials and processing techniques are highlighted. The figure illustrates the working principle of a DSC.

    9. Stressed Triangular Tessellations and Fibonacci Parastichous Spirals on Ag Core/SiO2 Shell Microstructures (pages 4652–4657)

      Chao-Rong Li, Ai-Ling Ji, Lei Gao and Ze-Xian Cao

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901061

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stress engineering offers an effective route for self-assembly of ordered patterns. By stressing Ag-core/SiO2-shell microstructures, spontaneous occurrence of triangular tessellations and Fibonacci parastichous spirals is observed on the spherical and conical core/shells, respectively. The stressed patterns are an immediate response to the geometry of the shrinking core/shells.

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