Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 6

February 9, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 6

Pages 615–728

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. Nanoscale Conducting Oxide Writing: Nanoscale Writing of Transparent Conducting Oxide Features with a Focused Ion Beam (Adv. Mater. 6/2009)

      Norma E. Sosa, Jun Liu, Christopher Chen, Tobin J. Marks and Mark C. Hersam

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990017

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A conductive atomic force microscopy tip probes an embedded, optically transparent, electrically conducting oxide nanowire that was patterned on an indium oxide substrate using focused ion beam implantation. The nanowire is 160 nm wide, 7 nm deep, and theoretically limitless in length, connectivity, and shape. Nanowires of this type have potential application as interconnects in transparent electronics. Further details can be found in the article by Tobin Marks, Mark Hersam and co-workers on p.721.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. Superoleophobic Surfaces: Bioinspired Design of a Superoleophobic and Low Adhesive Water/Solid Interface (Adv. Mater. 6/2009)

      Mingjie Liu, Shutao Wang, Zhixiang Wei, Yanlin Song and Lei Jiang

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990018

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The inside cover shows a bionic strategy to create a low-adhesive and superoleophobic interface via the oil/water/solid three-phase system, which was inspired by the antiwetting behavior of the oil droplets on the fish scales in water, as reported by Lei Jiang and co-workers on p.665. Such antiwetting behavior provides an insight into why many seabirds but few fish are killed when oil tanker spills occur.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Index
  4. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. Functional Covalent Chemistry of Carbon Nanotube Surfaces (pages 625–642)

      Xiaohui Peng and Stanislaus S. Wong

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801464

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rational covalent functionalization of single-walledcarbon nanotube (SWNT) surfaces can be used to carefully manipulate properties of SWNTs and enhance their performance in a wide range of diverse applications. In this review, we update on a number of diverse chemical strategies for productively functionalizing SWNTs at their ends, defect sites, and sidewalls. Potential applications in the fields of polymer composites and biological devices are also discussed.

  5. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. Self-Healing Polymers: Self-Healing Polymer Coatings (Adv. Mater. 6/2009)

      Soo Hyoun Cho, Scott R. White and Paul V. Braun

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990020

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dramatic reduction in corrosion of a steel plate coated with a self-healing coating (right) as compared to a conventional coating is demonstrated. Two samples were scratched and placed in 5% NaCl for 5 days. The background is an optical image (2× magnification), in the foreground is an SEM image of the scratch. In the self-healing sample, the scratch has almost completely self-healed, while in the control sample, the scratch remains all the way down to the substrate, as reported by Paul Braun and co-workers on p.645.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Index
    1. Self-Healing Polymer Coatings (pages 645–649)

      Soo Hyoun Cho, Scott R. White and Paul V. Braun

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802008

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-healing coatings that autonomically repair and prevent corrosion of the underlying substrate are created through dispersion of microencapsulated healing agents in a polymer film. Following a damage event, these healing agents are released into the damaged region, passivating the substrate. This approach to self-healing coatings is quite general, and is effective for both model and industrially important coating systems.

    2. Step-by-Step Build-Up of Biologically Active Cell-Containing Stratified Films Aimed at Tissue Engineering (pages 650–655)

      Laurent Grossin, Delphine Cortial, Benjamin Saulnier, Olivier Félix, Armelle Chassepot, Gero Decher, Patrick Netter, Pierre Schaaf, Pierre Gillet, Didier Mainard, Jean-Claude Voegel and Nadia Benkirane-Jessel

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801541

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      Alginate gel layers containing viable cells with adjacent bioactive polyelectrolyte multilayers are fabricated, and their bioactivity is shown to originate mainly from the degradation of the cells. Alternate biofunctionalized multilayers and cell-containing layers are shown to be an essential step toward fabrication of stratified architectures, and tuning the cellular activity is possible by controlling the position of active molecules.

    3. Integrating Biosensors and Drug Delivery: A Step Closer Toward Scalable Responsive Drug-Delivery Systems (pages 656–660)

      Han-Kuan Anthony Tsai, Elizabeth A. Moschou, Sylvia Daunert, Marc Madou and Lawrence Kulinsky

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801770

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A miniature biosensor immobilized on the backside of a gold lid is protected inside a microfabricated vial. To activate the protected biosensor, the conjugated polymer/gold lid is opened by the application of 800 mV. Both independent sensing and drug delivery from the microvalves are demonstrated.

    4. Water-Soluble Silicon Quantum Dots with Wavelength-Tunable Photoluminescence (pages 661–664)

      Zhenhui Kang, Yang Liu, Chi Him A. Tsang, Dorothy Duo Duo Ma, Xia Fan, Ning-Bew Wong and Shuit-Tong Lee

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801642

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      H-terminated Si quantum dots (Si QDs) with 3 nm diameter are converted to water-soluble uniform-sized Si QDs after controlled oxidation in an EtOH/H2O2 solution. These dots present Si/SiOxHy core/shell nanostructures, and can be finely tuned to emit light in seven different colors due to the quantum size effect in the Si cores, exhibiting excellent photocatalytic activity in the visible range.

    5. Bioinspired Design of a Superoleophobic and Low Adhesive Water/Solid Interface (pages 665–669)

      Mingjie Liu, Shutao Wang, Zhixiang Wei, Yanlin Song and Lei Jiang

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801782

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The wetting/antiwetting behavior of liquid droplets on a solid surface is not an apparent or simple contact between two phases, but among three phases. Inspired by the antiwetting behavior of oil droplets on fish scales in water, a superoleophobic and low-adhesive interface is created on a solid substrate with micro/nanohierarchical structures, using oil/water/solid three-phase systems.

    6. Diamond Nucleation by Carbon Transport from Buried Nanodiamond TiO2 Sol-Gel Composites (pages 670–673)

      Michaël Daenen, Liang Zhang, Rolf Erni, Oliver Aneurin Williams, An Hardy, Marlies Karolien Van Bael, Patrick Wagner, Ken Haenen, Miloš Nesládek and Gustaaf Van Tendeloo

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802305

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Diamond nucleation and growth can occur by diffusion of carbon from buried ultradispersed diamond seeds on a silicon substrate through a titanium oxide interlayer. This knowledge can improve nucleation and adhesion of thin diamond films on various substrates.

    7. Morphology-Selective Formation and Morphology-Dependent Gas-Adsorption Properties of Coordination Polymer Particles (pages 674–677)

      Hee Jung Lee, Won Cho, Soyoung Jung and Moonhyun Oh

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802485

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three coordination polymer particles (CPPs) are selectively synthesized using the solvothermal method. All three CPPs are prepared from the same building blocks. However, they form different morphologies, such as elongated hexagons, ellipsoids, and rods. Gas-adsorption measurements on N2, CO2, and H2 reveal that diversely shaped CPPs have different gas-adsorption properties, even though they have the same chemical compositions.

    8. Transparent and Photo-stable ZnO Thin-film Transistors to Drive an Active Matrix Organic-Light- Emitting-Diode Display Panel (pages 678–682)

      Sang-Hee K. Park, Chi-Sun Hwang, Minki Ryu, Shinhyuk Yang, Chunwon Byun, Jaeheon Shin, Jeong-Ik Lee, Kimoon Lee, Min Suk Oh and Seongil Im

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801470

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transparent ZnO thin-film transistors (TFTs) with a defect-controlled channel and channel/dielectric interface maintain good photo-stability during device operation. The figure shows a cross-sectional view of a top-gate ZnO-based transparent TFT/storage capacitor cell structure, connected to front-panel organic-light-emitting-diode pixels to operate in bottom emission mode.

    9. Solution-Processable Near-IR Photodetectors Based on Electron Transfer from PbS Nanocrystals to Fullerene Derivatives (pages 683–687)

      Krisztina Szendrei, Fabrizio Cordella, Maksym V. Kovalenko, Michaela Böberl, Günther Hesser, Maksym Yarema, Dorota Jarzab, Oleksandr V. Mikhnenko, Agnieszka Gocalinska, Michele Saba, Francesco Quochi, Andrea Mura, Giovanni Bongiovanni, Paul W. M. Blom, Wolfgang Heiss and Maria Antonietta Loi

      Version of Record online: 12 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801752

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanocrystal/fullerene derivative inorganic–organic hybrid photodetectors exhibiting high detectivity for near-IR wavelengths and a linear power dependence are produced. The ultrafast electron transfer from the PbS crystals to the fullerene opens a new route to obtaining efficient photodetectors that are appealing, cost-effective alternatives to the currently available technology.

    10. New Host Containing Bipolar Carrier Transport Moiety for High-Efficiency Electrophosphorescence at Low Voltages (pages 688–692)

      Zhi Qiang Gao, Meiming Luo, Xiao Hua Sun, Hoi Lam Tam, Man Shing Wong, Bao Xiu Mi, Ping Fang Xia, Kok Wai Cheah and Chin Hsin Chen

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702877

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new host material for use in phosphorescent OLEDs with desirable electronic properties has been synthesized. The material exhibits superior carrier-transport properties, a narrow optical band gap, relatively high triplet energy, and high thermal stability. It is synthesized by integrating hole-transporting carbazole groups into an electron-transporting phenanthroline core (see figure), and is demonstrated to be an excellent host for phosphorescent dopant emitters.

    11. The Magnetocaloric Effect of LaFe11.6Si1.4, La0.8Nd0.2Fe11.5Si1.5, and Ni43Mn46Sn11 Compounds in the Vicinity of the First-Order Phase Transition (pages 693–696)

      Jun-Ding Zou, Bao-Gen Shen, Bo Gao, Jun Shen and Ji-Rong Sun

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800955

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The magnetocaloric effect is discussed in terms of the thermodyna mic Maxwell relation and its necessary conditions. The origin of the sharp “spikes” that appear in entropy-change curves is discussed. The Maxwell relation and heat-capacity measurements are then used to determine the entropy change and are applied to the discussion of LaFe11.6Si1.4, La0.8Nd0.2Fe11.5Si1.5, and Ni43Mn46Sn11 compounds.

    12. Nanostructured ZnO-Based Surface with Reversible Electrochemically Adjustable Wettability (pages 697–701)

      Chantal Badre and Thierry Pauporté

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801555

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A ZnO-based smart surface functionalized by a surface-confined sub-monolayer layer of a purpose-built redox molecule is realized. The hybrid ferrocene/ZnO assembly exhibits a controllable wetting behavior with a contact angle that can be rapidly and reversibly adjusted to a defined value ranging from 110 ° to less than 10 ° (see figure).

    13. Microporous Conjugated Poly(thienylene arylene) Networks (pages 702–705)

      Johannes Schmidt, Jens Weber, Jan Dirk Epping, Markus Antonietti and Arne Thomas

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802692

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Conjugated microporous polymer networks containing thienyl units are synthesized from two different monomers using oxidative polymerization. The resulting high surface area materials present interface rich, conjugated-polymer architectures, and are promising candidates for advanced material applications, such as in the field of organic electronics, for sensors and solar cells, or as polymer supports for metal catalysts.

    14. Highly Cooperative Behavior of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Linked DNA-Modified Gold-Nanoparticle and Comb-Polymer Aggregates (pages 706–709)

      Abigail K. R. Lytton-Jean, Julianne M. Gibbs-Davis, Hai Long, George C. Schatz, Chad A. Mirkin and SonBinh T. Nguyen

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801724

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      PNA is used to assemble gold nanoparticles–DNA and polymer–DNA hybrids into highly cooperative aggregates with sharp melting transitions. The melting temperatures of these aggregates are found to increase with increasing salt concentrations, while the opposite trend is observed for unmodified PNA:DNA duplexes. This cooperative behavior is attributed to the presence of closely spaced duplexes inside the aggregate.

    15. High Dielectric Permittivity and Low Percolation Threshold in Nanocomposites Based on Poly(vinylidene fluoride) and Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplates (pages 710–715)

      Fuan He, Sienting Lau, Helen Laiwa Chan and Jintu Fan

      Version of Record online: 12 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801758

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel nanocomposite, based on poly-(vinylidene fluoride) and exfoliated graphite nanoplates (PVDF/xGnPs), exhibits high dielectric constant with a low percolation threshold, which can be attributed to the good dispersion of xGnP in the PVDF matrix and the formation of a large number of parallel-board microcapacitors.

    16. Enhanced Photocurrents Generated by Supramolecular &!hyphen;Relay/CdS-Nanoparticle/ Electron-Donor Structures on Gold Electrodes (pages 716–720)

      Ran Tel-Vered, Huseyin Bekir Yildiz and Itamar Willner

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801612

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Supramolecular assemblies consisting of CdS nanoparticles linked to I3-encapsulated β-cyclodextrin and to π-donor–acceptor complexes reveal the generation of enhanced photocurrents as a result of effective charge separation. The donor–acceptor complexes formed lead to effective trapping of the conduction-band electrons, and to concomitant scavenging of the valence-band holes by I3- encapsulated in the β-cyclodextrin receptor units.

    17. Nanoscale Writing of Transparent Conducting Oxide Features with a Focused Ion Beam (pages 721–725)

      Norma E. Sosa, Jun Liu, Christopher Chen, Tobin J. Marks and Mark C. Hersam

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802129

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Embedded, optically transparent, electrically conducting oxide nanowires, and other patterns are written on highly resistive transparent metal oxide thin films with nanoscale spatial control using focused ion beam implantation. The resulting transparent conducting oxide features are 110-160 nm wide, 7 nm deep, and are theoretically limitless in length, connectivity, and shape.

  7. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Index

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