Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 21 Issue 9

March 6, 2009

Volume 21, Issue 9

Pages 935–1022

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Self-Assembled Multicomponent Chromophores: Conjugated Oligoelectrolyte/ssDNA Aggregates: Self-Assembled Multicomponent Chromophores for Protein Discrimination (Adv. Mater. 9/2009)

      Huaping Li and Guillermo C. Bazan

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990030

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Guillermo Bazan and Huaping Li show on p. 964 that a range of optical reporters can be prepared by electrostatic interactions between a cationic conjugated oligoelectrolyte (COE) and dye-labeled single-stranded DNAs (ssDNA). Proteins perturb the optical properties of these aggregates and generate unique fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) patterns that allow protein discrimination. Two different signatures can be obtained, depending on whether the fluorescence intensity of the COE or the ssDNAbound dye is observed.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Programmable Drug Delivery: Core-Sheath Nanofibers Containing Colloidal Arrays in the Core for Programmable Multi-Agent Delivery (Adv. Mater. 9/2009)

      Eunmin Jo, Seongwon Lee, Kyu Tae Kim, Yong Sun Won, Hee-Soo Kim, Eun Chul Cho and Unyong Jeong

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990031

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Eun Chul Cho, Unyong Jeong, and co-workers demonstrate on p. 968 the programmable release of multiple agents by using polymeric core-sheath nanofibers consisting of arrays of colloids in the core and polymeric sheath. The fibers were produced by one-step single nozzle electrospinning. Loading different species of active agents in each colloid can provide independent control over the release of each agent.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. High-Performance SOFC Cathodes Prepared by Infiltration (pages 943–956)

      John M. Vohs and Raymond J. Gorte

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802428

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Infiltration of a porous yttria-stabilized zirconia scaffold provides for a high degree of flexibility in the choice of active materials used in the cathode of a solid oxide fuel cell. In this paper we review the infiltration method and how it is being used to produce high-performance cathodes.

  5. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Fast-Switching Electrochromic Films: Fast-Switching Electrochromic Films of Zinc Polyiminofluorene-Terpyridine Prepared Upon Coordinative Supramolecular Assembly (Adv. Mater. 9/2009)

      Anna Maier, A. Raman Rabindranath and Bernd Tieke

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bernd Tieke and co-workers (p. 959) have created incredibly thin films that change color in response to an electric current. The electrochromic films were self-assembled with zinc ions and polytopic polyiminofluorene-tpy ligands and can be switched between yellow, red, and blue; they exhibit switching times of 450 ms, and display high contrast and high stability. The cover shows the process of coordinative self-assembly and electrochromic switching, the background indicates the film surface.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
    1. Fast-Switching Electrochromic Films of Zinc Polyiminofluorene-Terpyridine Prepared Upon Coordinative Supramolecular Assembly (pages 959–963)

      Anna Maier, A. Raman Rabindranath and Bernd Tieke

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802490

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Coordinative self-assembly of zinc(II) ions and polytopic polyiminofluorene-tpy ligands is used to prepare electrochromic films with thickness in the nanometer range. The films can be switched between yellow, red, and blue, and exhibit switching times of 500 ms, high contrast, and high stability.

    2. Conjugated Oligoelectrolyte/ssDNA Aggregates: Self-Assembled Multicomponent Chromophores for Protein Discrimination (pages 964–967)

      Huaping Li and Guillermo C. Bazan

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802320

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A range of optical reporters is prepared by electrostatic interactions between a cationic conjugated oligoelectrolyte (COE) and dye-labeled single-stranded DNAs (ssDNA). Proteins perturb the optical properties of these aggregates, and generate unique fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) patterns that allow protein discrimination. Two different signatures can be obtained, depending on whether the fluorescence intensity of the COE or the ssDNA-bound dye is observed.

    3. Core-Sheath Nanofibers Containing Colloidal Arrays in the Core for Programmable Multi-Agent Delivery (pages 968–972)

      Eunmin Jo, Seongwon Lee, Kyu Tae Kim, Yong Sun Won, Hee-Soo Kim, Eun Chul Cho and Unyong Jeong

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802948

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymeric core-sheath nanofibers consisting of polymeric sheath and arrays of colloids in the core are produced by one-step single-nozzle electrospinning. Loading different species of active agents in each colloid provides control over the release of each of the agents independently, which enables a programmed release pattern for multiple agents.

    4. Broad-band and Omnidirectional Antireflection Coatings Based on Semiconductor Nanorods (pages 973–978)

      Silke L. Diedenhofen, Gabriele Vecchi, Rienk E. Algra, Alex Hartsuiker, Otto L. Muskens, George Immink, Erik P. A. M. Bakkers, Willem L. Vos and Jaime Gómez Rivas

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802767

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A broad-band and omnidirectional antireflection coating consisting of semiconductor nanowires is fabricated. The reflection is reduced due to a graded refractive index, which is achieved by a certain nanorod-length distribution of cylindrical and conically shaped rods. An increased transmission and, accordingly, a reduced reflection are demonstrated for the visible and near-infrared parts of the spectrum.

    5. Optoelectrothermic Control of Highly Integrated Polymer-Based MEMS Applied in an Artificial Skin (pages 979–983)

      Andreas Richter and Georgi Paschew

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802737

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A large-scale integration technology for MEMS based on the optoelectrothermic control of a temperature-sensitive hydrogel is described and exemplified using an imaging array system, a so-called artificial skin. The hydrogel itself acts as active functional unit, i.e., as actuator. The artificial skin comprises more than 4 000 individual actuators and provides both, visual and palpable artificial impressions of a surface.

    6. Reagentless Protein Assembly Triggered by Localized Electrical Signals (pages 984–988)

      Xiao-Wen Shi, Xiaohua Yang, Karen J. Gaskell, Yi Liu, Eiry Kobatake, William E. Bentley and Gregory F. Payne

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802820

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electrode-imposed signals are used to assemble proteins without the need for reactive reagents. The two-step assembly approach uses i) cathodic signals to electrodeposit the amino-polysaccharide chitosan and ii) anodic signals to activate the chitosan film for protein assembly. Proteins are shown to assemble at individual electrode addresses, with spatial selectivity and quantitative control.

    7. Nanorod-Driven Orientational Control of Liquid Crystal for Polarization-Tailored Electro-Optic Devices (pages 989–993)

      Somobrata Acharya, Sudarshan Kundu, Jonathan P. Hill, Gary J. Richards and Katsuhiko Ariga

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802743

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dispersion of ultranarrow ZnS nanorods of molecular dimensions encapsulated by a fluid-like soft organic layer in the nematic liquid crystal (LC ZLI-4792) results in a novel soft-matter-type blend with previously unachieved electro-optic properties. The local ordering of the nanorods significantly affects the global ordering of the blend, allowing a more rapid response.

    8. Highly Efficient Nanoporous TiO2-Polythiophene Hybrid Solar Cells Based on Interfacial Modification Using a Metal-Free Organic Dye (pages 994–1000)

      Rui Zhu, Chang-Yun Jiang, Bin Liu and S. Ramakrishna

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802388

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly efficient nanoporous TiO2-polythiophene hybrid solar cells are reported. A metal-free organic dye (D102) is employed to modify the TiO2/polythiophene interface. Results indicate dye and interfacial engineering are crucial for highly efficient TiO2/P3HT hybrid solar cells.

    9. Nanocomposite Films Assembled from Genetically Engineered Filamentous Viruses and Gold Nanoparticles: Nanoarchitecture- and Humidity-Tunable Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectra (pages 1001–1005)

      Aihua Liu, Gopal Abbineni and Chuanbin Mao

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800777

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanocomposite films are prepared by layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of cationic genetically engineered rodlike nontoxic viruses and anionic spherical Au nanoparticles. The cationic viruses electrostatically interact with the anionic Au nanoparticles to drive the LBL assembly. The nanocomposite films exhibit humidity-dependent surface plasmon resonance spectra (see figure).

    10. Electronic Properties at Gold/Conjugated-Polyelectrolyte Interfaces (pages 1006–1011)

      Jung Hwa Seo, Renqiang Yang, Jacek Z. Brzezinski, Bright Walker, Guillermo C. Bazan and Thuc-Quyen Nguyen

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200802420

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The chemical structures and electronic structures at conjugated polyelectrolyte/Au interfaces demonstrate that conjugated polyelectrolytes with identical backbones but different pendant charges and charge-compensating ions exhibit different electronic properties. This finding shows that counterions and backbone charges enable control of the electronic and chemical nature of critical device interfaces.

  7. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index
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      Ultrathin Nanowires—A Materials Chemistry Perspective (pages 1013–1020)

      Ludovico Cademartiri and Geoffrey A. Ozin

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200801836

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ultrathin nanowires, especially in colloidal form, represent a new material platform in the study of materials' behaviour, at the border between nanostructures and polymers. We here discuss some of the recent breakthroughs in the field and the synthetic methodologies they have introduced, their pros and cons, and some future directions of the field.

  8. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Index

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