Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 22 Issue 48

December 21, 2010

Volume 22, Issue 48

Pages 5435–5541

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    1. Artifi cal Spider Silk: Direction Controlled Driving of Tiny Water Drops on Bioinspired Artificial Spider Silks (Adv. Mater. 48/2010) (page 5435)

      Hao Bai, Xuelin Tian, Yongmei Zheng, Jie Ju, Yong Zhao and Lei Jiang

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090160

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover shows bio-inspired artificial spider silks with periodic spindle-knots (in pure white color) in humid air. Tiny water drops collect in controlled directions, forming large shiny water drops covering the spindle-knots. The ability to control the direction of fluid motion is critical for various applications, as reported by Lei Jiang and co-workers on p. 5521.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    1. Tissue Engineering: A Modular, Hydroxyapatite-Binding Version of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (Adv. Mater. 48/2010) (page 5436)

      Jae Sung Lee, Amy J. Wagoner Johnson and William L. Murphy

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090161

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      On p. 5494, William L. Murphy and co-workers report on a biomimetic peptide capable of binding hydroxapatite and promoting pro-angiogenic activity including endothelial cell growth and migration. Such a peptide could form a key material for growing, and healing bone tissue.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 48/2010) (pages 5437–5442)

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090162

  4. Correction

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Correction: Ultrafast Manipulation of Self-Assembled Form Birefringence in Glass (page 5442)

      Yasuhiko Shimotsuma, Masaaki Sakakura, Peter G. Kazansky, Martynas Beresna, Jiarong Qiu, Kiyotaka Miura and Kazuyuki Hirao

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090163

      This article corrects:

      Ultrafast Manipulation of Self-Assembled Form Birefringence in Glass

      Vol. 22, Issue 36, 4039–4043, Article first published online: 23 AUG 2010

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    1. Engineering the Extracellular Environment: Strategies for Building 2D and 3D Cellular Structures (pages 5443–5462)

      Orane Guillame-Gentil, Oleg Semenov, Ana Sala Roca, Thomas Groth, Raphael Zahn, Janos Vörös and Marcy Zenobi-Wong

      Article first published online: 14 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001747

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      Advances in cell sheet engineering allow the non-invasive release of cellular structures using temperature-sensitive, electrochemically addressable, and enzymatically degradable substrates. Here we review how cells interact with the extracellular environment and how this information is used to construct 2D and 3D cellular architectures.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    1. Long-Term Antimicrobial Effect of Silicon Nanowires Decorated with Silver Nanoparticles (pages 5463–5467)

      Min Lv, Shao Su, Yao He, Qing Huang, Wenbing Hu, Di Li, Chunhai Fan and Shuit-Tong Lee

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001934

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      Silicon nanowires (SiNWs), as a novel one-dimensional semiconducting nanomaterial, are attracting increasing interest in recent years. The synthesis of SiNWs with in situ grown silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) (SiNWs@AgNPs) is reported and the highly effective and long-term antibacterial activity of this novel nanostructure is demonstrated (see Fig.).

    2. When Function Follows Form: Effects of Donor Copolymer Side Chains on Film Morphology and BHJ Solar Cell Performance (pages 5468–5472)

      Jodi M. Szarko, Jianchang Guo, Yongye Liang, Byeongdu Lee, Brian S. Rolczynski, Joseph Strzalka, Tao Xu, Stephen Loser, Tobin J. Marks, Luping Yu and Lin X. Chen

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002687

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      Detailed structural organization in organic films are investigated using grazing incidence X-ray scattering (GIXS) methods. The key structural features are revealed and the influence of specific side chain positions and shapes are characterized. A correlation between the fill factor (FF) of the corresponding device and the tightness of the polymer chain stacking inspires a new set of structural parameters for design of materials to optimize device efficiency.

    3. Laundering Durability of Superhydrophobic Cotton Fabric (pages 5473–5477)

      Bo Deng, Ren Cai, Yang Yu, Haiqing Jiang, Chunlei Wang, Jiang Li, Linfan Li, Ming Yu, Jingye Li, Leidong Xie, Qing Huang and Chunhai Fan

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002614

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      A superhydrophobiccotton fabric is prepared by introducing a commercially available fluorinated acrylate monomer, 1H,1H,2H,2H-nonafluorohexyl-1-acrylate, onto cotton fabric under simultaneous radiation-induced graft polymerization. The superhydrophobic cotton fabric shows good laundering durability, whereby the superhydrophobicity is well kept after 50 individual accelerated launderings, which is equivalent to 250 commercial launderings or domestic launderings.

    4. A Novel Electrode Material for Symmetrical SOFCs (pages 5478–5482)

      Qiang Liu, Xihui Dong, Guoliang Xiao, Fei Zhao and Fanglin Chen

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001044

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      Perovskite Sr2Fe1.5Mo0.5O6 – δ (SFM) demonstrates excellent redox stability and shows remarkable electrical conductivity of 550 S cm−1 in air and 310 S cm−1 in hydrogen at 780 °C. SFM has been applied as both anode and cathode in symmetrical SOFCs using LSGM as the electrolyte, achieving a peak power density over 835 mW cm−2 at 900 °C using H2 as fuel and ambient air as oxidant.

    5. Non-Covalent Chemistry of Graphene: Electronic Communication with Dendronized Perylene Bisimides (pages 5483–5487)

      Nina V. Kozhemyakina, Jan M. Englert, Guang Yang, Erdmann Spiecker, Cordula D. Schmidt, Frank Hauke and Andreas Hirsch

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003206

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      Mutual attraction: π–π bonding promotes electronic interactions between graphene and a π-conjugated perylene in a liquid dispersion.

    6. X-Ray Detected Magnetic Hysteresis of Thermally Evaporated Terbium Double-Decker Oriented Films (pages 5488–5493)

      Ludovica Margheriti, Daniele Chiappe, Matteo Mannini, Pierre–E. Car, Philippe Sainctavit, Marie-Anne Arrio, Francesco Buatier de Mongeot, Julio C. Cezar, Federica M. Piras, Agnese Magnani, Edwige Otero, Andrea Caneschi and Roberta Sessoli

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003275

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      The successful evaporation of thick and thin films of an intact bis(phthalocyaninato)terbium single molecule magnet is reported and confirmed by chemical and magnetic characterization techniques. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals different magnetization dynamics associated to a change in the orientation of the molecules depending on the thickness of the films.

    7. A Modular, Hydroxyapatite-Binding Version of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (pages 5494–5498)

      Jae Sung Lee, Amy J. Wagoner Johnson and William L. Murphy

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002970

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We report a modular peptide that mimics the pro-angiogenic properties of vascular endothelial growth factor and the hydroxyapatite-binding ability of bone protein osteocalcin. It binds rapidly and efficiently to hydroxyapatite, and locally induces early pro-angiogenic activities, including endothelial cell proliferation and migration both when it exists in a soluble form and when it is immobilized on a hydroxyapatite biomaterial.

    8. Stimulation of Cell Adhesion at Nanostructured Teflon Interfaces (pages 5499–5506)

      Sebastian Kruss, Tobias Wolfram, Raquel Martin, Stefanie Neubauer, Horst Kessler and Joachim P. Spatz

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003055

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      Tunable gold nanoparticle patterns have been immobilized onto amorphous teflon surfaces in a stable manner. This method provides a general route to covalently link biomolecules onto chemically inert teflon surfaces, which enhances endothelialization.

    9. Multiple Stable States with In-Plane Anisotropy in Ultrathin YMnO3 Films (pages 5507–5511)

      Zhigao Sheng, Naoki Ogawa, Yasushi Ogimoto and Kenjiro Miyano

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002743

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      Coherent epitaxial YMnO3 ultrathin films have been built and their symmetries were studied using second harmonic generation technique. The underlying symmetry, trigonality, was revealed by the pseudomorphic strain effect and a new in-plane component with six-fold symmetry emerges in addition to usual polarization along c-axis. Its in-plane anisotropy provides possible multiple states which is significant for its potential applications.

    10. Highly Stable Transparent Amorphous Oxide Semiconductor Thin-Film Transistors Having Double-Stacked Active Layers (pages 5512–5516)

      Jae Chul Park, Sangwook Kim, Sunil Kim, Changjung Kim, Ihun Song, Youngsoo Park, U-In Jung, Dae Hwan Kim and Jang-Sik Lee

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002397

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      A novel device structure is presented for amorphous oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors with high performance as well as improved electrical/optical stress stability. The highly stable transistor devices are developed using composition-modulated dual active layers. This approach could potentially be used to fabricate product-level display devices using amorphous oxide semiconductors in the near future.

    11. Electric-Field Control of the Metal-Insulator Transition in Ultrathin NdNiO3 Films (pages 5517–5520)

      Raoul Scherwitzl, Pavlo Zubko, I. Gutierrez Lezama, Shimpei Ono, Alberto F. Morpurgo, Gustau Catalan and Jean-Marc Triscone

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003241

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reversible electric-field control of the metal-insulator transition in the rare earth nickelate compound NdNiO3 is demonstrated. Using the electric double layer technique, giant modulations in the conductance as well as large shifts in the transition temperature are obtained.

    12. Direction Controlled Driving of Tiny Water Drops on Bioinspired Artificial Spider Silks (pages 5521–5525)

      Hao Bai, Xuelin Tian, Yongmei Zheng, Jie Ju, Yong Zhao and Lei Jiang

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003169

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Inspired by spider silk, a series of artificial spider silks with spindle-knots are fabricated. Tiny water drops (tens of picoliters) are driven with controllable direction on the fiber surfaces. The study will help the future design of smart materials and devices to drive tiny water drops in a controllable manner.

    13. A New Type of Electrolyte with a Light-Trapping Scheme for High-Efficiency Quasi-Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 5526–5530)

      Meng Wang, Xu Pan, Xiaqin Fang, Lei Guo, Weiqing Liu, Changneng Zhang, Yang Huang, Linhua Hu and Songyuan Dai

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003044

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      The nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4′-n-heptyloxybiphenyl, is not only used to solidify a liquid electrolyte but also as a light-trapping material for quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The existence of a light-trapping scheme in a quasi-solid-state electrolyte would increase the optical path length of the incident light and consequently the light-harvesting efficiency, which benefits IPCE and the photocurrent of the DSSC.

    14. Graphene Quantum Sheets: A New Material for Spintronic Applications (pages 5531–5536)

      Shyamal K. Saha, Moni Baskey and Dipanwita Majumdar

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003300

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Graphene quantum sheets of size 2-5 nm are synthesized to achieve remarkable magnetoresistance behavior as a result of ferromagnetic edges coupled through antiferromagnetic interaction. These spin valve-like quantum sheets with ferromagnetic edges separated by a nonmagnetic core have potential applications in spintronic devices.

    15. Mineralization of Self-assembled Peptide Nanofibers for Rechargeable Lithium Ion Batteries (pages 5537–5541)

      Jungki Ryu, Sung-Wook Kim, Kisuk Kang and Chan Beum Park

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201000669

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Peptide Self-Assembly for Lithium Ion Batteries: Nanostructures of transition metal phosphates were fabricated through biomimetic mineralization of self-assembled peptide hydrogel nanofibers. FePO4-mineralized peptide nanofibers were readily converted to carbon-coated FePO4 nanotubes after heat treatment and exhibited a high and reversible charge/discharge capacity as Lithium ion battery cathodes.

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