Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 22 Issue 10

Special Issue: Materials@Illinois

March 12, 2010

Volume 22, Issue 10

Pages 1031–1164

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Research News
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Review
    12. Progress Report
    13. Research News
    14. Communication
    15. Frontispiece
    16. Research News
    17. Communications
    1. Materials@Illinois (Adv. Mater. 10/2010)

      Version of Record online: 9 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090025

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      In this Special Issue of Advanced Materials, Guest Editor Professor Jennifer A. Lewis presents an overview of the cutting-edge research being carried out at Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (UIUC). The issue is divided into three broad themes: materials synthesis and assembly; functional materials for energy harvesting, transport, and storage; and advanced techniques for materials characterization, and provides a fascinating glimpse inside one of the world's leading centers of materials science research.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Research News
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Review
    12. Progress Report
    13. Research News
    14. Communication
    15. Frontispiece
    16. Research News
    17. Communications
    1. Nanostructured Plasmonic Materials: Functional Nanostructured Plasmonic Materials (Adv. Mater. 10/2010)

      Jimin Yao, An-Phong Le, Stephen K. Gray, Jeffrey S. Moore, John A. Rogers and Ralph G. Nuzzo

      Version of Record online: 9 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090026

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      The inside cover shows computed electromagnetic field distributions of a 3D plasmonic crystal comprising a square array of nanoholes embossed in polyurethane with a thin conformal gold layer. These nanohole array plasmonic crystals support multiple surface plasmon modes that enable multispectral imaging and detection of surface species in white light, as described in the Progress Report by Nuzzo, Rogers, and co-workers on page 1102.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Research News
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Review
    12. Progress Report
    13. Research News
    14. Communication
    15. Frontispiece
    16. Research News
    17. Communications
  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Research News
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Review
    12. Progress Report
    13. Research News
    14. Communication
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    16. Research News
    17. Communications
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      Materials@Illinois (page 1037)

      Jennifer A. Lewis and Eric B. Duoss

      Version of Record online: 9 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904347

  5. Frontispiece

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    8. Progress Report
    9. Research News
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Review
    12. Progress Report
    13. Research News
    14. Communication
    15. Frontispiece
    16. Research News
    17. Communications
  6. Review

    1. Top of page
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    5. Editorial
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    7. Review
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    9. Research News
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    11. Review
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    14. Communication
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    17. Communications
    1. Applications of Ultrasound to the Synthesis of Nanostructured Materials (pages 1039–1059)

      Jin Ho Bang and Kenneth S. Suslick

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904093

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      Ultrasound is a versatile tool for the synthesis of nanostructured materials. For both sonochemistry and ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP), the reaction sites are isolated nanoscale reactors: for sonochemistry, the hot spot inside a collapsing cavitation bubble, whereas for USP, a heated liquid droplet. In each case, unique reaction conditions are created: e.g., acoustic cavitation produces transient temperatures of >5000 K, pressures of ∼1000 bar, and cooling rates of >1010 K s−1.

  7. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
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    1. Janus Particle Synthesis and Assembly (pages 1060–1071)

      Shan Jiang, Qian Chen, Mukta Tripathy, Erik Luijten, Kenneth S. Schweizer and Steve Granick

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904094

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      Janus particles, colloid-sized particles with two regions of different surface chemical composition, possess energetic interactions that depend not only on their separation but also on their orientation. Research on Janus and colloidal particles that are chemically patchy in even more complicated fashion has opened a new chapter in the colloid research field. This report highlights recent progress in both experiment and theory regarding synthesis and self-assembly of Janus particles, and tentatively outlines some areas of future opportunity.

  8. Research News

    1. Top of page
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    1. Conjugated Carbon Monolayer Membranes: Methods for Synthesis and Integration (pages 1072–1077)

      Sakulsuk Unarunotai, Yuya Murata, Cesar E. Chialvo, Nadya Mason, Ivan Petrov, Ralph G. Nuzzo, Jeffrey S. Moore and John A. Rogers

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904095

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      Monolayer membranes of conjugated carbon, especially graphene, have promising properties for many types of applications. Recent advances in methods for producing this class of material are reviewed.

    2. Water-Soluble Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters (pages 1078–1082)

      Hangxun Xu and Kenneth S. Suslick

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904199

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      Water-soluble fluorescent Ag nanoclusters have been successfully prepared using radiolytic, chemical reduction and photochemical approaches. The optical and photoluminescence properties of the Ag nanoclusters are easily controlled by the synthetic conditions.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Research News
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Review
    12. Progress Report
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    14. Communication
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    17. Communications
  10. Review

    1. Top of page
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    14. Communication
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    17. Communications
    1. Multidimensional Architectures for Functional Optical Devices (pages 1084–1101)

      Kevin A. Arpin, Agustin Mihi, Harley T. Johnson, Alfred J. Baca, John A. Rogers, Jennifer A. Lewis and Paul V. Braun

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904096

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      Materials exhibiting multidimensional structure on the nanometer to micrometer scale (see figure) have extraordinary potential for optical applications due to their potential of regulating light–matter interactions. Advanced multidimensional structures have been demonstrated as the basis for three-dimensional photonic-bandgap materials, optical cloaking, metamaterials, chemical and biological sensors, and highly efficient low-cost solar cells.

  11. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
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    14. Communication
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    17. Communications
    1. Functional Nanostructured Plasmonic Materials (pages 1102–1110)

      Jimin Yao, An-Phong Le, Stephen K. Gray, Jeffrey S. Moore, John A. Rogers and Ralph G. Nuzzo

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904097

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      Plasmonic crystals that offer exceptional analytical power along tunable wavelengths present a promising platform for the sensing and imaging of surface binding events with high spatial resolution and submonolayer sensitivity. The design, fabrication, and characterization of these devices and their applications in biochemical sensing and imaging are briefly reviewed here. The figure shows a transmitted white light plasmonic image of 1-octadecanethiol lines printed on the Au surface of a full 3D plasmonic crystal.

  12. Research News

    1. Top of page
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    1. Superconducting Nanowires Fabricated Using Molecular Templates (pages 1111–1121)

      Alexey Bezryadin and Paul M. Goldbart

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904353

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      Two DNA molecules are placed across a trench etched into a SiN-coated substrate. After sputter-coating with a few-nanometer-thick MoGe film each suspended DNA is transformed into a superconducting nanwoire with a DNA molecule at its core. It is demonstrated that such nanowires can be used to fabricate magnetic-field-sensitive quantum interferometers as well as samples that can be used to study the effect of macroscopic quantum tunneling.

    2. Local Structure of Layered Oxide Electrode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 1122–1127)

      J. Bareño, C. H. Lei, J. G. Wen, S.-H. Kang, I. Petrov and D. P. Abraham

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904247

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      Structure of (rhombohedral) layered lithium oxides consisting of a NaCl-like stack of hexagonal close-packed planes (O-red, Li-yellow, Metal-blue). LiMn substitutionals (yellow dots) in Li2MnO3 arrange in regular hexagonal sublattices at Mn planes, resulting in a monoclinic structure which unit cell is indicated in the figure by a blue box.

    3. Recent Advances in the Study of Structural Materials Compatibility with Hydrogen (pages 1128–1135)

      M. Dadfarnia, P. Novak, D. C. Ahn, J. B. Liu, P. Sofronis, D. D. Johnson and I. M. Robertson

      Version of Record online: 9 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904354

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      For the hydrogen economy to be realized a fracture prediction methodology that can be used to assess hydrogen-induced degradation in structural materials exposed to high-pressure gaseous environments needs to be developed. In this Research News article, the recent work on numerical simulations and experimental observations that aims to relate characteristics of the degradation mechanisms with macroscopic indices of embrittlement is reviewed.

  13. Communication

    1. Top of page
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    17. Communications
    1. New Optical Absorption Bands in Atomic-Layer Superlattices (pages 1136–1139)

      Xiaofang Zhai, Chandra S. Mohapatra, Amish B. Shah, Jian-Min Zuo and James N. Eckstein

      Version of Record online: 9 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904197

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      New optical absorption bands can be engineered by combining two different phases into a superlattice using atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy as shown in the figure. Transitions from one layer to another occur at frequencies determined by the electronic structure of the component layers and how the energy levels of the two materials line up at the intrfaces.

  14. Frontispiece

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    17. Communications
  15. Research News

    1. Top of page
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    1. Ultrafast Imaging and the Phase Problem for Inelastic X-Ray Scattering (pages 1141–1147)

      Peter Abbamonte, Gerard C. L. Wong, David G. Cahill, James P. Reed, Robert H. Coridan, Nathan W. Schmidt, Ghee Hwee Lai, Young Il Joe and Diego Casa

      Version of Record online: 3 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904098

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      A space–time image of valence excitation in a model insulator, LiF, is shown in the figure. The quantity shown is the “density Green's function”, which can be imagined as a ripple of density generated by an idealized point source (depicted as bright light in the image). The image was reconstructed from inelastic X-ray scattering experiments and has an effective time resolution of 26 as (2.6 × 10−17 s).

    2. Magnetic-Field- and Pressure-Induced Quantum Phases in Complex Materials (pages 1148–1155)

      Minjung Kim, Harini Barath, Xiaoqian Chen, Young-Il Joe, Eduardo Fradkin, Peter Abbamonte and S. Lance Cooper

      Version of Record online: 9 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904246

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      Magnetic-field- and pressure-dependent light scattering studies of strongly coupled materials are discussed in the Progress Report. The quantum phases and physical properties of charge-ordered, multiferroic, and charge density wave materials can be sensitively tuned with applied fields and/or pressure (see figure, green boxes) because of strong interactions (red arrows) among the spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom (blue ellipses).

  16. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    1. Probing Interfacial Electronic Structures in Atomic Layer LaMnO3 and SrTiO3 Superlattices (pages 1156–1160)

      Amish B. Shah, Quentin M. Ramasse, Xiaofang Zhai, Jian Guo Wen, Steve J. May, Ivan Petrov, Anand Bhattacharya, Peter Abbamonte, James N. Eckstein and Jian-Min Zuo

      Version of Record online: 10 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904198

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      The interfacial electronic structure characterization of a (LaMnO3)/(SrTiO3) superlattice based on scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Evidence of interfacial band alignment and electron transfer are presented based on the observation of O K edge of individual transition metal and oxygen atomic columns. Electron probe aberration correction was essential for the high spatial resolution mapping of interfacial electronic states.

    2. Competitive Abnormal Grain Growth between Allotropic Phases in Nanocrystalline Nickel (pages 1161–1164)

      L. N. Brewer, D. M. Follstaedt, K. Hattar, J. A. Knapp, M. A. Rodriguez and I. M. Robertson

      Version of Record online: 3 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904245

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      Electron backscatter diffraction-generated phase map showing the distribution of the abnormally grown grains for both the face centered cubic (red) and hexagonal close packed (blue) phases. Annealing condition was 17 h at 548 K.

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