Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 22 Issue 2

January 12, 2010

Volume 22, Issue 2

Pages 135–300

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Review Article
    1. Nanogap Electrodes: Nanogap Electrodes (Adv. Mater. 2/2010)

      Tao Li, Wenping Hu and Daoben Zhu

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990188

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      Nanogap electrodes are fundamental building blocks for nanometer-sized devices and circuits. They are also important tools for the examination of material properties at nanometer scale, even at molecular scale. The techniques for the fabrication of nanogap electrodes, the preparation of assembled devices based on nanogap electrodes, and the potential application of these nanodevices for the analysis of material properties are reviewed on p. 286 by Wenping Hu, Daoben Zhu, and Tao Li.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Review Article
    1. Inorganic Materials and Ionic Liquids: Preparation of Inorganic Materials Using Ionic Liquids (Adv. Mater. 2/2010)

      Zhen Ma, Jihong Yu and Sheng Dai

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990189

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      The synthesis of several categories of inorganic materials using, or in the presence of, ionic liquids is reviewed by Sheng Dai and co-workers on p. 261. The inside cover shows SEM images of hierarchically patterned macroporous TiO2 prepared using a mixture of 1-octadecene (ODE) and an ODE-immiscible ionic liquid as the reaction medium.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Review Article
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 2/2010) (pages 135–138)

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200990190

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Review Article
    1. You have free access to this content
      Materials Science: State of the Art 2010 (page 139)

      Dave Flanagan

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200904184

  5. Progress Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Review Article
    1. You have free access to this content
      Molecules on Si: Electronics with Chemistry (pages 140–159)

      Ayelet Vilan, Omer Yaffe, Ariel Biller, Adi Salomon, Antoine Kahn and David Cahen

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901834

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      Molecular effects on ransport across metal/organic molecule/semiconductor junctions, in contrast to metal/molecule/metal ones, can be solely electrostatic rather han be the result of the transmittance of molecules. In extremis, this yields metal/insulator/semiconductor (MIS) behavior in structures, apparently without insulator. This Progress Report also considers transport mechanisms, effects of new energy levels from molecule-electrode interactions, and temperature effects on ransport.

    2. The Intermediate Band Solar Cell: Progress Toward the Realization of an Attractive Concept (pages 160–174)

      Antonio Luque and Antonio Martí

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902388

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      The intermediate band (IB) solar cell has been proposed to increase the current of solar cells while maintaining the voltage in order to produce an efficiency that ideally is above the limit established by Shockley and Queisser in 1961. The concept is described and the present realizations and acquired understanding are explained.

    3. Controlling Stem Cell Fate with Material Design (pages 175–189)

      Ross A. Marklein and Jason A. Burdick

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901055

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      Stem cells respond to a range of cues found in their native tissue microenvironments and these same signals (e.g., mechanics, adhesion, topography) are now being incorporated into biomaterials to control stem cell fate. These approaches are particularly intriguing for the development of scaffolding to aid in tissue regeneration.

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Review Article
    1. Dendritic Polyglycerols for Biomedical Applications (pages 190–218)

      Marcelo Calderón, Mohiuddin Abdul Quadir, Sunil Kumar Sharma and Rainer Haag

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902144

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      The current status of dendritic polyglycerols as functional dendritic architectures with particular focus on their biomedical applications is described in this Review. Drug, dye, and gene delivery for nanomedicine as well as non-fouling surfaces and matrix materials for regenerative medicine are highlighted as potential application areas.

    2. Epitaxial Growth and Properties of Doped Transition Metal and Complex Oxide Films (pages 219–248)

      Scott A. Chambers

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200901867

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      Transition metal oxides exhibit a range of properties unparalleled by any other class of materials. Modern epitaxial film growth methods allow these properties to be controlled and utilized to gain fundamental understanding and create new functionality to underpin technological innovation. This Review provides a broad overview of recent research activity in oxide epitaxy, and includes highlights from material systems of high current interest.

    3. Bio-microfluidics: Biomaterials and Biomimetic Designs (pages 249–260)

      Peter Domachuk, Konstantinos Tsioris, Fiorenzo G. Omenetto and David L. Kaplan

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900821

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      Bio-microfluidics applies biomaterials and biologically inspired structural designs (biomimetics) to microfluidic devices. Microfluidics, the techniques for constraining fluids on the micrometer- and sub-micrometer scale, offers applications ranging from lab-on-a-chip to optofluidics. Despite this wealth of applications, the design of typical microfluidic devices imparts relatively simple, laminar behavior on fluids and is realized using materials and techniques from silicon planar fabrication.

    4. Preparation of Inorganic Materials Using Ionic Liquids (pages 261–285)

      Zhen Ma, Jihong Yu and Sheng Dai

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900603

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The synthesis of inorganic materials using, or in the presence of, ionic liquids represents a burgeoning direction in materials chemistry. This technique provides an alternative to conventional inorganic materials synthesis, which relies heavily on water and organic molecules as solvents. In this Review, the use of ionic liquids in the preparation of several categories of inorganic and hybrid materials is summarized.

  7. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Review Article
    1. You have free access to this content
      Nanogap Electrodes (pages 286–300)

      Tao Li, Wenping Hu and Daoben Zhu

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200900864

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The fabrication of nanogap electrodes is key for the construction of nanodevices. Here some representative methods for the fabrication of nanogap electrodes, the application of nanogap electrodes in devices, and the analysis of material properties, are reviewed. The history, the research status, and the prospects and challenges in the research of nanogap electrodes are also discussed.

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