Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 22 Issue 41

November 2, 2010

Volume 22, Issue 41

Pages 4541–4653

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    1. Writing Nanostructures: Scanning Probe Direct-Write of Germanium Nanostructures (Adv. Mater. 41/2010)

      Jessica D. Torrey, Stephanie E. Vasko, Adnan Kapetanovic, Zihua Zhu, Andreas Scholl and Marco Rolandi

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090133

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover image depicts the direct writing of a germanium nanostructure with the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Germanium writing occurs when the AFM tip traces the desired shape along a biased silicon sample while immersed in an organometallic precursor (diphenylgermane). The high-electric field and the electrons emitted from the tip cause the precursor to locally react and yield germanium nanostructures. This innovative AFM strategy creates sub-30 nm carbon-free germanium nanostructures with desired geometries and placement, as reported on p. 4639 by Marco Rolandi and co-workers.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    1. Battery Electrodes: Self-Wound Composite Nanomembranes as Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries (Adv. Mater. 41/2010)

      Heng-Xing Ji, Xing-Long Wu, Li-Zhen Fan, Cornelia Krien, Irina Fiering, Yu-Guo Guo, Yongfeng Mei and Oliver G. Schmidt

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090134

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-wound nanomembranes from functional multilayered structures can improve lithium storage performance report Yongfeng Mei and co-workers on p. 4591. Intrinsic strain is relaxed by rolling; the composite components are uniformly dispersed; the micro/nanohierarchical structure assumes a mixed ion/electron conduction network; and the conventional nanomembrane deposition techniques allow for various materials combinations, making the technique suitable for meeting different demands in lithium ion batteries.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
  4. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    1. Bio-Inspired Materials – Mining the Old Literature for New Ideas (pages 4547–4550)

      Peter Fratzl and Steve Weiner

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002127

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Historical scientific books describe a wealth of organisms which could be useful to materials scientists in search of “bio-inspiration”. Very often these books are not written in English, and are not easy for the materials science community to access. We propose that translating and re-editing such books or making them available electronically could be of extreme value to present-day researchers. (Side view of a diatom with a siliceous skeleton drawn by Häckel in 1904, reproduced with permission from Marixverlag GmbH, Wiesbaden.)

  5. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    1. Biomimetic Nanopatterns as Enabling Tools for Analysis and Control of Live Cells (pages 4551–4566)

      Deok-Ho Kim, Hyojin Lee, Young Kwang Lee, Jwa-Min Nam and Andre Levchenko

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201000468

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Progress in using biomimetic nanopatterns for cell biological applications has been rapidly accelerating. Here, bio-nanopatterning methods and their applications as enabling tools for analysis and control of live cells are extensively discussed. This review also highlights the impact of nanoscale engineering in controlling cell-material interfaces, with profound implications for future developments in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    1. Self-Assembly of Hyperbranched Polymers and Its Biomedical Applications (pages 4567–4590)

      Yongfeng Zhou, Wei Huang, Jinyao Liu, Xinyuan Zhu and Deyue Yan

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201000369

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hyperbranched polymers have demonstrated great potential as excellent precursors in supramolecular self-assembly, and many delicate supramolecular structures from zero-dimension to three-dimension have been prepared, such as micelles, fibers, tubes, vesicles, membranes, large compound vesicles and so on. They have displayed promising applications in the biomedical areas including drug delivery, protein purification/detection/delivery, gene transfection, antibacterial/antifouling materials and cytomimetic chemistry.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    1. Self-Wound Composite Nanomembranes as Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries (pages 4591–4595)

      Heng-Xing Ji, Xing-Long Wu, Li-Zhen Fan, Cornelia Krien, Irina Fiering, Yu-Guo Guo, Yongfeng Mei and Oliver G. Schmidt

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001422

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-wound nanomembranes out of functional multilayered structures were designed to improve lithium storage performance. The intrinsic strain is relaxed by rolling; the composite components are uniformly dispersed; the micro/nanohierarchical structure assumes a mixed ion/electron conduction network; and conventional nanomembrane deposition techniques allow for various materials combinations, suitable to meet different demands of lithium ion batteries.

    2. Rapid Nanoimprinting of Doped Silk Films for Enhanced Fluorescent Emission (pages 4596–4599)

      Jessica P. Mondia, Jason J. Amsden, Dianmin Lin, Luca Dal Negro, David L. Kaplan and Fiorenzo G. Omenetto

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001238

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Doping ease and the ability to readily nanoimprint silk films offer the possibility to rapidly prototype photonic devices that couple optical functions with embedded material properties. By imprinting fluorescent silk films with periodic nanoscale lattices matched to the emission spectra of the doping fluorophores it is possible to selectively enhance the emission from the film.

    3. Nanoparticle Stripes, Grids, and Ribbons Produced by Flow Coating (pages 4600–4604)

      Hyun Suk Kim, Cheol Hee Lee, P. K. Sudeep, Todd Emrick and Alfred J. Crosby

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001892

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multicomponent and robust structures of quantum dots, in the form of stripes and grids, are produced by a simple flow coating method giving unprecedented control over macroscopic architectures from nanoscopic components. Crosslinking and lift-off of stripes lead to free-floating structures of nanoparticles that are flexible, robust, and fluorescent.

    4. High-Pressure Chemical Deposition for Void-Free Filling of Extreme Aspect Ratio Templates (pages 4605–4611)

      Neil F. Baril, Banafsheh Keshavarzi, Justin R. Sparks, Mahesh Krishnamurthi, Ivan Temnykh, Pier J. A. Sazio, Anna C. Peacock, Ali Borhan, Venkatraman Gopalan and John V. Badding

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001199

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Near atomically smooth, void-free, centimeter-long amorphous silicon waveguides are produced by high pressure chemical fluid deposition in the pores of a microstructured optical fiber template (right inset). Semiconductor waveguides fabricated by conventional deposition/fabrication approaches have a surface roughness that is a constraining factor in most optoelectronic devices, but these waveguides conform to the extraordinarily geometrically perfect optical fiber pores (DIC image, bottom inset).

    5. Inkjet Printing of TIPS-PEN on Soluble Polymer Insulating Films: A Route to High-Performance Thin-Film Transistors (pages 4612–4616)

      B. K. Charlotte Kjellander, Wiljan T. T. Smaal, John E. Anthony and Gerwin H. Gelinck

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001697

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We present an approach to inkjet print high-performance organic transistors by printing the organic semiconductor ink on a thin, continuous, and solvent-absorbing layer of insulating material. The ink spreading is effectively controlled by local dissolution of the layer, and during drying the characteristic circular morphology with high rims and inner plateau forms.

    6. Transistor Paint: High Mobilities in Small Bandgap Polymer Semiconductor Based on the Strong Acceptor, Diketopyrrolopyrrole and Strong Donor, Dithienopyrrole (pages 4617–4621)

      Toby L. Nelson, Tomasz M. Young, Junying Liu, Sarada P. Mishra, John A. Belot, Courtney L. Balliet, Anna E. Javier, Tomasz Kowalewski and Richard D. McCullough

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001599

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A narrow bandgap, strong donor-acceptor polymer semiconductor is presented. This “transistor paint” material exhibits hole mobilities as high as 0.41 cm2/Vs. Importantly, the semiconductor yields high reproducible mobility values of 0.28 cm2/Vs ± 0.019 for a range of channel lengths when measured from several transistors on different days.

    7. Batch Fabrication of High-Performance Planar Patch-Clamp Devices in Quartz (pages 4622–4627)

      John M. Nagarah, Eunsu Paek, Yi Luo, Pin Wang, Gyeong S. Hwang and James R. Heath

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001793

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The success of the patch-clamp technique has driven an effort to create wafer-based patch-clamp platforms. We develop a lithographic/electrochemical processing scheme that generates ultrasmooth, high aspect ratio pores in quartz. These devices achieve gigaohm seals in nearly 80% of trials, with the majority exhibiting seal resistances from 20-80 GΩ, competing with pipette-based patch-clamp measurements.

    8. Localized Surface Plasmons Shed Light on Nanoscale Metal Hydrides (pages 4628–4633)

      Igor Zoric´, Elin M. Larsson, Bengt Kasemo and Christoph Langhammer

      Article first published online: 23 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201000973

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanometer-sized hydrides are attractive for hydrogen storage. Nanofabricated model systems can be studied by a novel localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based direct sensing approach and by quartz crystal microbalance. The role of nanoparticle size, shape and microstructure on the storage thermodynamics can be scrutinized.

    9. Monolithic Integration of Multi-Color Organic LEDs by Grayscale Lithography (pages 4634–4638)

      Malte C. Gather, Nils M. Kronenberg and Klaus Meerholz

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A single step process to fabricate arrays of organic LEDs with emission colors across the entire visible spectrum is introduced (see picture). This multi-color monolithic integration of OLEDs is enabled by a grayscale lithography scheme that inscribes thickness profiles into crosslinkable hole-transport layers. When introduced into a micro-cavity OLED, these thickness variations translate into shifts of the resonant wavelength of the cavity.

    10. Scanning Probe Direct-Write of Germanium Nanostructures (pages 4639–4642)

      Jessica D. Torrey, Stephanie E. Vasko, Adnan Kapetanovic, Zihua Zhu, Andreas Scholl and Marco Rolandi

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001987

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Atomic force direct-write of carbon-free germanium nanostructures is easily accomplished via high-field reaction of liquid diphenylgermane precursor. Sub-30 nm features are written in arbitrary patterns at velocities as high as 100 μm s−1.

    11. A Spider-Web-Like Highly Expandable Sensor Network for Multifunctional Materials (pages 4643–4648)

      Giulia Lanzara, Nathan Salowitz, Zhiqiang Guo and Fu-Kuo Chang

      Article first published online: 7 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201000661

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A multiscale method that allows a noninvasive and precise integration of thousands of nano- or microscale electronic devices into large macroscopic materials or structures of any 3D shape and rigidity is demonstrated. An array of microsensors (for strain and temperature) is built on a spider-web-like, highly expandable and flexible polyimide substrate that is engineered in such a way as to allow unique area dilatations.

    12. Split-Gate Organic Field Effect Transistors: Control Over Charge Injection and Transport (pages 4649–4653)

      Ben B. Y. Hsu, Ebinazar B. Namdas, Jonathan D. Yuen, Shinuk Cho, Ifor D.W. Samuel and Alan J. Heeger

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001509

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A split-gate field effect transistor containing four electrodes, source, drain, two gates allows enhanced transport for specific carrier species and separate control of carrier polarity over two gate regimes. The device can be operated as a transistor or a diode by controlling gate biases.

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