Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 22 Issue 8

February 23, 2010

Volume 22, Issue 8

Pages 863–906, E1–E88

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Communications
    7. Cover Picture “Advanced Energy Materials”
    8. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Energy Materials”
    9. Contents “Advanced Energy Materials”
    10. Editorial “Advanced Energy Materials”
    11. Reviews “Advanced Energy Materials”
    12. Communications “Advanced Energy Materials”
    13. Research News “Advanced Energy Materials”
    1. Elastic 3D Scaffolds: Elastic Fully Three-dimensional Microstructure Scaffolds for Cell Force Measurements (Adv. Mater. 8/2010)

      Franziska Klein, Thomas Striebel, Joachim Fischer, Zhongxiang Jiang, Clemens M. Franz, Georg von Freymann, Martin Wegener and Martin Bastmeyer

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090016

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Martin Bastmeyer and co-workers report on p. 868 the fabrication of elastic structures with submicrometer thickness for cell culture that can be deformed by forces exerted by single cardiomyocytes. The cover illustrates a 3D reconstruction of cardiomyocytes labeled for f-actin (green) and a-actinin (red) growing in an Ormocomp scaffold consisting of posts connected by flexible beams. This method offers the possibility to study cell behavior in a 3D environment with defined geometries and physiologically-relevant stiffness values. Cover artwork by M.S. Rill.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Communications
    7. Cover Picture “Advanced Energy Materials”
    8. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Energy Materials”
    9. Contents “Advanced Energy Materials”
    10. Editorial “Advanced Energy Materials”
    11. Reviews “Advanced Energy Materials”
    12. Communications “Advanced Energy Materials”
    13. Research News “Advanced Energy Materials”
    1. Metallic Glass Nanowires: Controlled Formation and Mechanical Characterization of Metallic Glassy Nanowires (Adv. Mater. 8/2010)

      Koji S. Nakayama, Yoshihiko Yokoyama, Takahito Ono, Ming Wei Chen, Kotone Akiyama, Toshio Sakurai and Akihisa Inoue

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090017

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      Owing to the absence of dislocation defects and grain boundaries, the amorphous structure of metallic glass possesses superior mechanical properties compared to its crystalline counterparts. Koji Nakayama and co-workers present on p. 872 a method that is capable of producing metallic glass nanowires. The image shows that the free end wire in the center oscillates like a sine-wave pattern implying extremely high elasticity. The authors have succeeded to measure these mechanical properties at the nanoscale.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Communications
    7. Cover Picture “Advanced Energy Materials”
    8. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Energy Materials”
    9. Contents “Advanced Energy Materials”
    10. Editorial “Advanced Energy Materials”
    11. Reviews “Advanced Energy Materials”
    12. Communications “Advanced Energy Materials”
    13. Research News “Advanced Energy Materials”
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 8/2010) (pages 863–866)

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090018

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Communications
    7. Cover Picture “Advanced Energy Materials”
    8. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Energy Materials”
    9. Contents “Advanced Energy Materials”
    10. Editorial “Advanced Energy Materials”
    11. Reviews “Advanced Energy Materials”
    12. Communications “Advanced Energy Materials”
    13. Research News “Advanced Energy Materials”
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      Energizing Research (page 867)

      Martin Ottmar

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201000182

  5. Communications

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    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Communications
    7. Cover Picture “Advanced Energy Materials”
    8. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Energy Materials”
    9. Contents “Advanced Energy Materials”
    10. Editorial “Advanced Energy Materials”
    11. Reviews “Advanced Energy Materials”
    12. Communications “Advanced Energy Materials”
    13. Research News “Advanced Energy Materials”
    1. Elastic Fully Three-dimensional Microstructure Scaffolds for Cell Force Measurements (pages 868–871)

      Franziska Klein, Thomas Striebel, Joachim Fischer, Zhongxiang Jiang, Clemens M. Franz, Georg von Freymann, Martin Wegener and Martin Bastmeyer

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902515

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      Elastic 3D scaffolds (see figure) are fabricated into a biocompatible photoresist using direct laser writing. These scaffolds can be rhythmically deformed by single beating cardiomyocytes and calibration with atomic force microscopy indicates that cellular forces down to 10–20 nN are detectable with the setup.

    2. Controlled Formation and Mechanical Characterization of Metallic Glassy Nanowires (pages 872–875)

      Koji S. Nakayama, Yoshihiko Yokoyama, Takahito Ono, Ming Wei Chen, Kotone Akiyama, Toshio Sakurai and Akihisa Inoue

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902295

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      Extraordinary flexible, very long, and individual amorphous nanowires composed of metallic glasses are produced by the drawing process based on superplastic deformation above the glass transition temperature. The outstanding mechanical properties of metallic glasses including low Young's modulus and high strength can be inherited in nanowire.

    3. Electronic-Field Control of Two-Dimensional Electrons in Polymer-Gated–Oxide Semiconductor Heterostructures (pages 876–879)

      Masaki Nakano, Atsushi Tsukazaki, Akira Ohtomo, Kazunori Ueno, Shunsuke Akasaka, Hiroyuki Yuji, Ken Nakahara, Tomoteru Fukumura and Masashi Kawasaki

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902162

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      A defect-free and electronically abrupt polymer/oxide interface can be achieved by spin-coating of PEDOT:PSS on ZnO-based heterostructures. The interface yielding Schottky contact leads to the successful modulation of quantum 2D transport in MgZnO/ZnO interfaces via the electric-field effect, which indicates that the polymer/oxide interface enables a high-mobility field-effect transistor.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Correction: Electronic-Field Control of Two-Dimensional Electrons in Polymer-Gated-Oxide Semiconductor Heterostructures

      Vol. 22, Issue 45, 5081, Article first published online: 30 NOV 2010

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Correction: Electronic-Field Control of Two-Dimensional Electrons in Polymer-Gated-Oxide Semiconductor Heterostructures

      Vol. 22, Issue 14, Article first published online: 12 APR 2010

    4. Cooperative Nanoparticles for Tumor Detection and Photothermally Triggered Drug Delivery (pages 880–885)

      Ji-Ho Park, Geoffrey von Maltzahn, Luvena L. Ong, Andrea Centrone, T. Alan Hatton, Erkki Ruoslahti, Sangeeta N. Bhatia and Michael J. Sailor

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902895

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      A cooperative nanosystem consisting of two distinct nanomaterials works in vivo to detect tumor tissues and deliver drugs to the site. Gold nanorods (GNRs) localize to the tumor region, where they report their location and convert near-infrared radiation to thermal energy. Circulating thermally labile therapeutic liposomes respond to the thermal signal, releasing their drug payload selectively in the GNR-populated tumor.

    5. Glass-Forming Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Oligomers for New Tunable Solid-State Laser (pages 886–891)

      Seiichi Furumi and Nobuyuki Tamaoki

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902552

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      A new potential utility of glass-forming cholesteric liquid crystal (G-CLC) oligomers for application in tunable solid-state laser is presented. The G-CLC is capable of tuning the photonic band gaps (PBGs) by way of the annealing temperature and preserving the tuned PBGs by a subsequent supercooling treatment. This G-CLC film enables the facile fabrication of a continuously gradated PGB structure and, thus, the continuous tuning of a single laser-emission peak (see figure).

    6. Electrically Conductive “Alkylated” Graphene Paper via Chemical Reduction of Amine-Functionalized Graphene Oxide Paper (pages 892–896)

      Owen C. Compton, Dmitriy A. Dikin, Karl W. Putz, L. Catherine Brinson and SonBinh T. Nguyen

      Article first published online: 16 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902069

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      Conductive “alkylated” graphene paper is prepared by post-fabrication modification of graphene oxide paper with hexylamine followed by hydrazine reduction in a one-pot process. The “alkylation” with hexylamine stabilizes the stacked paper structure during the reduction, maintaining its well-ordered morphology and resulting in uniform conductivity and good mechanical properties.

    7. Stenciling Graphene, Carbon Nanotubes, and Fullerenes Using Elastomeric Lift-Off Membranes (pages 897–901)

      Jonathan K. Wassei, Vincent C. Tung, Steven J. Jonas, Kitty Cha, Bruce S. Dunn, Yang Yang and Richard B. Kaner

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902360

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      Stenciling graphene, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes, all of which are in hydrazine, can be stenciled onto substrates using a thin elastiomeric membrane composed of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (see figure). This method represents a flexible route to stencil a family of carbon nanomaterials and could be used for patterning other solvent dispersed derivatives of fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphenes.

    8. A Route to High-Quality Crystalline Coaxial Core/Multishell Ge@Si(GeSi)n and Si@(GeSi)n Nanowire Heterostructures (pages 902–906)

      Moshit Ben-Ishai and Fernando Patolsky

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902815

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      The layer-by-layer formation and characterization of conformally smooth, uniform, and single-crystalline Ge(core)/Si–Ge–Si(multishell) and Si(core)/Ge–Si(multishell) nanowire heterostructures is reported. The modulation of their radial composition is well-defined and there is precise control over a wide range of shell thicknesses regardless of the initial nanowire core diameter.

  6. Cover Picture “Advanced Energy Materials”

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Communications
    7. Cover Picture “Advanced Energy Materials”
    8. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Energy Materials”
    9. Contents “Advanced Energy Materials”
    10. Editorial “Advanced Energy Materials”
    11. Reviews “Advanced Energy Materials”
    12. Communications “Advanced Energy Materials”
    13. Research News “Advanced Energy Materials”
    1. Organic Electronics: Improved Performance of Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Through the Reduction of Phase Separation via Solvent Additives (Adv. Mater. 8/2010)

      Corey V. Hoven, Xuan-Dung Dang, Robert C. Coffin, Jeff Peet, Thuc-Quyen Nguyen and Guillermo C. Bazan

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090019

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      The fabrication of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells from solution-casting techniques using low-cost materials makes them a promising new technology for converting sunlight into electricity. T.-Q. Nguyen, G. C. Bazan, et al. report on p. E63 that undesirable large-scale aggregation and phase separation that may arise during deposition can be reduced by incorporating a small amount of a well-chosen solvent additive.

  7. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Energy Materials”

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Communications
    7. Cover Picture “Advanced Energy Materials”
    8. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Energy Materials”
    9. Contents “Advanced Energy Materials”
    10. Editorial “Advanced Energy Materials”
    11. Reviews “Advanced Energy Materials”
    12. Communications “Advanced Energy Materials”
    13. Research News “Advanced Energy Materials”
    1. Macromolecular Scaffolding: Macromolecular scaffolding: The relationship between nanoscale architecture and function in multichromophoric arrays for organic electronics (Adv. Mater. 8/2010)

      Vincenzo Palermo, Erik Schwartz, Chris E. Finlayson, Andrea Liscio, Matthijs B. J. Otten, Sara Trapani, Klaus Müllen, David Beljonne, Richard H. Friend, Roeland J. M. Nolte, Alan E. Rowan and Paolo Samorì

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090020

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      The image shows a 3D representation of a new class of macromolecules for organic electronics formed by rigid polymeric backbones (blue) side-functionalized with thousands of polyaromatic, optically active molecules (red). In the background, the real polymer fibers as presented by V. Palermo, K. Müllen, D. Beljonne, R. H. Friend, A. E. Rowan, P. Samorì, et al. on p. E81 are visualized by AFM. The authors thank the ESF-SONS2 programme for financial support.

  8. Contents “Advanced Energy Materials”

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    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Communications
    7. Cover Picture “Advanced Energy Materials”
    8. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Energy Materials”
    9. Contents “Advanced Energy Materials”
    10. Editorial “Advanced Energy Materials”
    11. Reviews “Advanced Energy Materials”
    12. Communications “Advanced Energy Materials”
    13. Research News “Advanced Energy Materials”
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 8/2010) (pages E1–E3)

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090021

  9. Editorial “Advanced Energy Materials”

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    7. Cover Picture “Advanced Energy Materials”
    8. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Energy Materials”
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    10. Editorial “Advanced Energy Materials”
    11. Reviews “Advanced Energy Materials”
    12. Communications “Advanced Energy Materials”
    13. Research News “Advanced Energy Materials”
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      Advanced Energy Materials Needed (pages E4–E5)

      Christoph Brabec and Manfred Waidhas

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201000183

  10. Reviews “Advanced Energy Materials”

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    7. Cover Picture “Advanced Energy Materials”
    8. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Energy Materials”
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    11. Reviews “Advanced Energy Materials”
    12. Communications “Advanced Energy Materials”
    13. Research News “Advanced Energy Materials”
    1. Solar-Energy Production and Energy-Efficient Lighting: Photovoltaic Devices and White-Light-Emitting Diodes Using Poly(2,7-fluorene), Poly(2,7-carbazole), and Poly(2,7-dibenzosilole) Derivatives (pages E6–E27)

      Serge Beaupré, Pierre-Luc T. Boudreault and Mario Leclerc

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200903484

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      Recent progress in energy-efficient lighting using polymer white-light-emitting diodes (WPLEDs) and solar-energy production through photovoltaic devices based on poly(2,7-fluorene), poly(2,7-carbazole), and poly(2,7-dibenzosilole) derivatives, three promising classes of conjugated polymers based on bridged phenylenes, is reviewed.

    2. Advanced Materials for Energy Storage (pages E28–E62)

      Chang Liu, Feng Li, Lai-Peng Ma and Hui-Ming Cheng

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200903328

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      Energy storage materials play a key role in efficient, clean, and versatile use of energy, and are crucial for the exploitation of renewable energies. Strategies for developing advanced materials for hydrogen storage and electrode materials of lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors are discussed. Future trends and prospects in the development of advanced energy storage materials are highlighted.

  11. Communications “Advanced Energy Materials”

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    7. Cover Picture “Advanced Energy Materials”
    8. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Energy Materials”
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    10. Editorial “Advanced Energy Materials”
    11. Reviews “Advanced Energy Materials”
    12. Communications “Advanced Energy Materials”
    13. Research News “Advanced Energy Materials”
    1. Improved Performance of Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Through the Reduction of Phase Separation via Solvent Additives (pages E63–E66)

      Corey V. Hoven, Xuan-Dung Dang, Robert C. Coffin, Jeff Peet, Thuc-Quyen Nguyen and Guillermo C. Bazan

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200903677

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A high-boiling-point additive that favors both poly[(4,4-didodecyldithieno[3,2-b:2′,3′-d]silole)-2,6-diyl-alt-(2,1,3-benzoxadiazole)-4,7-diyl] and PC71BM in a bulk heterojunction solar cell is used to reduce large-scale aggregation and phase separation, which increases device performance. This is in contrast to the majority of high-boiling-point additives that improve performance by increasing phase separation.

    2. Optimizing Polymer Tandem Solar Cells (pages E67–E71)

      Jan Gilot, Martijn M. Wienk and René A. J. Janssen

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902398

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Optimized tandem solar cells based on wide-and small-bandgap polymer semiconductor cells reach an efficiency of 4.9%. In this tandem cell the short-circuit current exceeds that of the current-limiting subcell. The recombination layer that connects the two subcells does not impose important losses.

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      Poly(alkylene biguanides) as Proton Conductors for High-Temperature PEMFCs (pages E72–E76)

      Jochen Britz, Wolfgang H. Meyer and Gerhard Wegner

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902834

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      Poly(alkylene biguanides) are novel high-temperature proton conductors. This long-known class of polymers is presented as surprisingly stable high-temperature proton-conducting materials in the form of water-free HCl conjugates. Proton conductivity is dominated by free volume relaxation. Application in the context of fuel-cell membranes is discussed.

    4. High-Efficiency Polymer Tandem Solar Cells with Three-Terminal Structure (pages E77–E80)

      Srinivas Sista, Ziruo Hong, Mi-Hyae Park, Zheng Xu and Yang Yang

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200902750

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      Tandem solar cells have the advantage of enhancing the absorption range of polymer solar cells. A three-terminal tandem cell based on two polymer bulk heterojunctions that have complementary absorption profile is demonstrated. In this device configuration the two subcells are connected in parallel through a common semitransparent metal interlayer and an efficiency of 4.8% with short circuit current of 15.1 mA cm−2 is achieved.

  12. Research News “Advanced Energy Materials”

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    7. Cover Picture “Advanced Energy Materials”
    8. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Energy Materials”
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    10. Editorial “Advanced Energy Materials”
    11. Reviews “Advanced Energy Materials”
    12. Communications “Advanced Energy Materials”
    13. Research News “Advanced Energy Materials”
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      Macromolecular Scaffolding: The Relationship Between Nanoscale Architecture and Function in Multichromophoric Arrays for Organic Electronics (pages E81–E88)

      Vincenzo Palermo, Erik Schwartz, Chris E. Finlayson, Andrea Liscio, Matthijs B. J. Otten, Sara Trapani, Klaus Müllen, David Beljonne, Richard H. Friend, Roeland J. M. Nolte, Alan E. Rowan and Paolo Samorì

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.200903672

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Accurate control over the position of functional groups can be obtained by developing ultrarigid synthetic macromolecular scaffolds exposing the functional groups of choice in the side-chains. This allows fine tuning of the electronic interaction between organic semiconducting moieties: the (opto)electronic properties of these new functional architectures are explored by constructing prototypes of field-effect transistors and solar cells.

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