Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 1

January 4, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 1

Pages 1–135

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    1. Non-Reflecting Surfaces: Non-Reflecting Silicon and Polymer Surfaces by Plasma Etching and Replication (Adv. Mater. 1/2011) (page 1)

      Lauri Sainiemi, Ville Jokinen, Ali Shah, Maksim Shpak, Susanna Aura, Pia Suvanto and Sami Franssila

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090164

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      On the cover, a beam of broadband light hits a prism. Instead of typical dispersion and reflection from the prism, the reflection is almost totally suppressed and the light can be absorbed by the material of the prism if the surface has adequate nanotexture. The article on p. 122 by Lauri Sainiemi and co-workers describes a high throughput and low-cost method for fabrication of such nanostructured, non-reflection silicon and polymer surfaces by plasma etching and replication.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    1. Nanosensors: Batteryless Chemical Detection with Semiconductor Nanowires (Adv. Mater. 1/2011) (page 2)

      Xianying Wang, Yinmin Wang, Daniel Åberg, Paul Erhart, Nipun Misra, Aleksandr Noy, Alex V. Hamza and Junhe Yang

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090165

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      A batteryless chemical sensor is developed by Xianying Wang, Yinmin Wang, and co-workers on p. 117. The nanosensor relies on dynamic interactions of molecules with semiconductor nanowire surfaces that can induce electrical voltages between segments of nanowires. The work overcomes the power requirement of traditional sensors and has the advantage of simplicity, high sensitivity, and quickness in detecting various molecules.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 1/2011) (pages 3–8)

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090166

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
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  5. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    1. Infrared Colloidal Quantum Dots for Photovoltaics: Fundamentals and Recent Progress (pages 12–29)

      Jiang Tang and Edward H. Sargent

      Article first published online: 14 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001491

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      Infrared colloidal quantum dots that absorb most of the solar radiation enable potential efficient and low-cost photovoltaic devices. Careful optimization of quantum dot passivation and device configuration leads to solar cells with AM1.5G efficiency as high as 5.1%

  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    1. Self-Assembled Photonic Structures (pages 30–69)

      Juan F. Galisteo-López, Marta Ibisate, Riccardo Sapienza, Luis S. Froufe-Pérez, Álvaro Blanco and Cefe López

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201000356

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      Photonic crystals and, more recently, photonic glasses embody concepts that capture the essence of solid state physics and many aspects of materials science, bringing them together in the field of photonic materials. Self-assembly and colloidal techniques constitute proven bottom-up methods that have spread and are very popular nowadays. Characterization and modelling techniques develop abreast of applications. The illustration is an optical microscope image of a self-assembled photonic crystal where terraces of different thicknesses can be distinguished by their color. Near the terraces’ edges crystal orientation usually changes and can be appreciated by their color.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    1. MoO3 Films Spin-Coated from a Nanoparticle Suspension for Efficient Hole-Injection in Organic Electronics (pages 70–73)

      Jens Meyer, Rebecca Khalandovsky, Patrick Görrn and Antoine Kahn

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003065

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      MoO3 films spin-coated from a suspension of nanoparticles, which offers energetic properties nearly identical to those of thermally evaporated MoO3 films, are reported. It is demonstrated that our solution-based MoO3 acts as a very efficient hole-injection layer for organic devices.

    2. Advancing MIM Electronics: Amorphous Metal Electrodes (pages 74–78)

      E. William Cowell III, Nasir Alimardani, Christopher C. Knutson, John F. Conley Jr., Douglas A. Keszler, Brady J. Gibbons and John F. Wager

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002678

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      Amorphous metal thin films with atomically smooth surfaces are employed as contact layers for the realization of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) devices operating on the basis of controlled quantum mechanical tunneling through an ultrathin dielectric.

    3. “Sandwich” Microcontact Printing as a Mild Route Towards Monodisperse Janus Particles with Tailored Bifunctionality (pages 79–83)

      Tobias Kaufmann, M. Talha Gokmen, Christian Wendeln, Martin Schneiders, Stefan Rinnen, Heinrich F. Arlinghaus, Stefan A. F. Bon, Filip E. Du Prez and Bart Jan Ravoo

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003564

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      A “sandwich” microcontact printing method is reported. A monolayer of porous epoxy polymer microspheres is transformed into Janus particles with distinct functionality on each face by reaction with amine functional fluorescent dyes, carbohydrates, and magnetic nanoparticles.

    4. Air/Liquid-Pressure and Heartbeat-Driven Flexible Fiber Nanogenerators as a Micro/Nano-Power Source or Diagnostic Sensor (pages 84–89)

      Zetang Li and Zhong Lin Wang

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003161

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      A pressure-driven flexible fiber nanogenerator (FNG) is demonstrated that can be used for smart shirts, flexible electronics, and medical applications. An output peak voltage of 3.2 V and average current density of 0.15 μA cm−2 are demonstrated. The pressure-driven FNG added to a syringe shows potential to harvest energy in a blood vessel, as well as in gas pipes and oil pipes. The heart-pulse driven FNG can serve as an ultrasensitive sensor for monitoring the behavior of a human heart for medical diagnostics.

    5. Surface Functionalization of Porous Coordination Nanocages Via Click Chemistry and Their Application in Drug Delivery (pages 90–93)

      Dan Zhao, Songwei Tan, Daqiang Yuan, Weigang Lu, Yohannes H. Rezenom, Hongliang Jiang, Li-Qun Wang and Hong-Cai Zhou

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003012

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      Porous coordination nanocages covered with alkyne groups are synthesized through judicious selection of the ligand and reaction conditions. The surface functionalization via click reaction with azide-terminated polyethylene glycol turns them into water-stable colloids, which exhibit controlled release of an anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil.

    6. Fundamental Limits on the Mobility of Nanotube-Based Semiconducting Inks (pages 94–99)

      Nima Rouhi, Dheeraj Jain, Katayoun Zand and Peter John Burke

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003281

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      High mobility and high on/off ratio thin-film transistors are fabricated using solution-based deposition of purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes. A comprehensive spectrum of the density starting from less than 10 tubes μm−2 to the high end of around 100 tubes μm−2 is investigated. This study provides the first important roadmap for the tradeoffs between mobility and on/off ratio in nanotube-based semiconducting inks.

    7. Enhanced Charge Injection in Pentacene Field-Effect Transistors with Graphene Electrodes (pages 100–105)

      Sangchul Lee, Gunho Jo, Seok-Ju Kang, Gunuk Wang, Minhyeok Choe, Woojin Park, Dong-Yu Kim, Yung Ho Kahng and Takhee Lee

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003165

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      Pentacene organic field-effect transistors with multilayer graphene electrodes exhibit a lower contact resistance and lower charge-injection barrier height than those with conventional Au electrodes. This enhancement in performance is related to the favorable dipole layer formation at the graphene/pentacene interface.

    8. Elastomeric Electrospun Polyurethane Scaffolds: The Interrelationship Between Fabrication Conditions, Fiber Topology, and Mechanical Properties (pages 106–111)

      Nicholas J. Amoroso, Antonio D’Amore, Yi Hong, William R. Wagner and Michael S. Sacks

      Article first published online: 27 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003210

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      Elastomeric electrospun constructfabrication conditions are evaluated with regard to their effect on fiber topology and biaxial mechanical response. It is determined that fiber alignment alone is insufficient to predict mechanical response. Moreover, fiber intersection density is introduced as a quantifiable structural measure that can be manipulated to achieve mechanical anisotropy similar to that of native soft tissues.

    9. On Realizing Higher Efficiency Polymer Solar Cells Using a Textured Substrate Platform (pages 112–116)

      Kanwar S. Nalwa, Joong-Mok Park, Kai-Ming Ho and Sumit Chaudhary

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002898

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      Polythiophene:fullerene bulk-heterojunction solar cells are fabricated on a one-dimensional photoresist grating of 2 μm pitch and 300 nm height. These dimensions ensure conformal coating of the photovoltaic active-layer and lead to higher power conversion efficiency due to light-trapping, especially for higher wavelength photons.

    10. Batteryless Chemical Detection with Semiconductor Nanowires (pages 117–121)

      Xianying Wang, Yinmin Wang, Daniel Åberg, Paul Erhart, Nipun Misra, Aleksandr Noy, Alex V. Hamza and Junhe Yang

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003221

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      A batteryless chemical nanosensor has been developed from either vertically (ZnO) or randomly aligned (Si) semiconductor nanowires. The nanosensor makes use of a unique molecule–surface interaction mechanism that induces an electric potential difference between two electrodes. The magnitude of the electric potential depends sensitively on the molecule type and concentration. We demonstrate the sensing ability of two different platforms using ethanol molecules. Quantum mechanical calculations suggest that the batteryless nanosensor described may be universally applicable to other semiconductor materials.

    11. Non-Reflecting Silicon and Polymer Surfaces by Plasma Etching and Replication (pages 122–126)

      Lauri Sainiemi, Ville Jokinen, Ali Shah, Maksim Shpak, Susanna Aura, Pia Suvanto and Sami Franssila

      Article first published online: 27 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001810

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      Maskless plasma etching forms nanospikes on a silicon wafer. The inverse of the nanospike pattern is replicated into a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) film by casting. The PDMS functions as a stamp for replicating the original pattern into polymeric substrates. All nanospike-structured surfaces suppress light reflection and can be made self-cleaning.

    12. Thin Film Structure of Triisopropylsilylethynyl-Functionalized Pentacene and Tetraceno[2,3-b]thiophene from Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction (pages 127–131)

      Stefan C. B. Mannsfeld, Ming Lee Tang and Zhenan Bao

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003135

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      The specific molecular arrangement of triisopropylsilylethynyl (TIPS)-functionalized acenes is widely considered to be the origin of the high performance of TIPS-pentacene thin film devices. However, detailed information on the molecular packing is so far only available for bulk single crystals, and the molecular packing of TIPS-functionalized acenes in thin films has not been directly determined to date. A combination of ultrabright synchrotron grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) and crystallographic refinement calculations is utilized to obtain precise information about the molecular packing of two high-performance TIPS-functionalized semiconductors, TIPS- tetraceno[2,3-b]thiophene and TIPS-pentacene, in thin films on silicon oxide.

    13. Particle-Dissociating Peptides (pages 132–135)

      Stanley Brown and Signe Mathiasen

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002130

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      Proteins dissociating insoluble particles are identified through a rapid genetic test. One polypeptide catalyzes the solvation of insoluble rare earth salts, with each protein molecule releasing thousands of holmium cations in less than one hour.

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