Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 12

March 25, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 12

Pages 1419–1471, H1–H126

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Bioinspired Materials: Bio-inspired Design of Submerged Hydrogel-Actuated Polymer Microstructures Operating in Response to pH (Adv. Mater. 12/2011) (page 1419)

      Lauren D. Zarzar, Philseok Kim and Joanna Aizenberg

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190034

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover depicts polymer “microfins” embedded in pH-responsive gel and submerged in water. Actuation of the fins driven by volume phase transitions in a pH-responsive hydrogel “muscle” may be able to drive the flow of particles in solution, as proposed on p. 1442 by Joanna Aizenberg and co-workers. The system is designed to provide uniform directional bending actuation over a large area and integrated with electrochemical and microfluidic cells.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Liquid Crystals: Thermally Induced, Multicolored Hyper-Reflective Cholesteric Liquid Crystals (Adv. Mater. 12/2011) (page 1420)

      Michael E. McConney, Vincent P. Tondiglia, Jennifer M. Hurtubise, Lalgudi V. Natarajan, Timothy J. White and Timothy J. Bunning

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190035

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      While chiral nematic liquid crystals are promising for a variety of dynamic photonic applications, their contrast is usually limited to 50%. Timothy J. Bunning and co-workers present a system that dynamically induces contrast approaching 100% at multiple wavelengths using temperature on p. 1453. The inside cover is a rendered graphic of a surface bound helicoidal structured polymer network that templates the local liquid crystal molecules. The green background is a color enhanced polarized optical microscopy image of the liquid crystal texture in the non-templated region that is critical to thermal tuning behavior. Cover design by Michael E. McConney.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 12/2011) (pages 1421–1424)

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190036

  4. Correction

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
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      Correction: Recent Progress on ZnO-Based Metal-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors and Their Application in Transparent Integrated Circuits (page 1425)

      Heiko Frenzel, Alexander Lajn, Holger von Wenckstern, Michael Lorenz, Friedrich Schein, Zhipeng Zhang and Marius Grundmann

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190037

  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
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  6. Correspondences

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Comment on “Organometallic Complexes for Nonlinear Optics. 45. Dispersion of the Third-order Nonlinear Optical Properties of Triphenylamine-cored Alkynylruthenium Dendrimers” – Increasing the Nonlinear Optical Response by Two Orders of Magnitude (pages 1428–1432)

      Javier Pérez-Moreno and Mark G. Kuzyk

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003421

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two-photon absorption (TPA) efficiency – scale corrected – as a function of the number of effective electrons, Neff, for the N-core organometallics dendrimers reported by Roberts et. al. (1, 2, 3; spheres); which are two orders of magnitude more efficient than the N-core organic dendrimers (G0, G1, G2; hexagons) used for comparison.

    2. Electronic, Molecular Weight, Molecular Volume, and Financial Cost-Scaling and Comparison of Two-Photon Absorption Efficiency in Disparate Molecules (Organometallic Complexes for Nonlinear Optics. 48.) – A Response to “Comment on ‘Organometallic Complexes for Nonlinear Optics. 45. Dispersion of the Third-Order Nonlinear Optical Properties of Triphenylamine-Cored Alkynylruthenium Dendrimers.’ Increasing the Nonlinear Response by Two Orders of Magnitude.” (pages 1433–1435)

      Torsten Schwich, Marie P. Cifuentes, Paul A. Gugger, Marek Samoc and Mark G. Humphrey

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004348

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The two-photon absorption cross-sections of related organometallic and organic dendrimers have been compared using a basket of scaling factors, the results revealing that organometallics are highly competitive as possible nonlinear optical materials viewed from economic, size, and weight perspectives, as well as consideration of π-electron contribution.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. External Quantum Efficiency Above 20% in Deep Blue Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 1436–1441)

      Soon Ok Jeon, Sang Eok Jang, Hyo Suk Son and Jun Yeob Lee

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004372

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly efficient deep blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) with external quantum efficiency above 20% are developed using a bipolar-type high-triplet-energy host material and a high-triplet-energy exciton blocking material. Maximum quantum efficiency of 25.1% and low roll-off (still 23.1% at 1000 cd m−2) are achieved in these deep blue PHOLEDs.

    2. Bio-inspired Design of Submerged Hydrogel-Actuated Polymer Microstructures Operating in Response to pH (pages 1442–1446)

      Lauren D. Zarzar, Philseok Kim and Joanna Aizenberg

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004231

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A bio-inspired hybrid materials system has been developed by utilizing pH-responsive, poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide) hydrogel as the “muscle” that dynamically and reversibly actuates the embedded microposts and microfins while the sample is submerged. The system is designed to provide uniform directional bending actuation over a large area and integrated with electrochemical and microfluidic cells.

    3. Optical Modulation of the Charge Injection in an Organic Field-Effect Transistor Based on Photochromic Self-Assembled-Monolayer-Functionalized Electrodes (pages 1447–1452)

      Núria Crivillers, Emanuele Orgiu, Federica Reinders, Marcel Mayor and Paolo Samorì

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003736

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Source and drain functionalization with a light-responsive azobenzene-based self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is used to modulate the charge injection at the Au electrode–semiconductor interface of an organic field-effect transistor (OFET). This photochromic bistable SAM mediates the injection through the variation of the tunneling barrier across the SAM.

    4. Thermally Induced, Multicolored Hyper-Reflective Cholesteric Liquid Crystals (pages 1453–1457)

      Michael E. McConney, Vincent P. Tondiglia, Jennifer M. Hurtubise, Lalgudi V. Natarajan, Timothy J. White and Timothy J. Bunning

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003552

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A dynamic multicolored cholesteric cell is formed using chiral, structured, surface-tethered polymer networks. The multicolored cholesteric cell is filled with a thermally tunable liquid crystal mixture of opposite handedness of the polymer networks, which enables thermally induced hyper-reflectivity at the two reflection bands induced by the surface tethered polymer.

    5. Phononic Crystals for Shaping Fluids (pages 1458–1462)

      Yannyk Bourquin, Rab Wilson, Yi Zhang, Julien Reboud and Jonathan M. Cooper

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004455

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Phononic crystals are acoustic metamaterials that are used to shape fluid droplets by controlling their interaction with acoustic waves in a manner tunable by the frequency of the excitation. By shaping the field generated by surface acoustic waves (SAWs), a precise control over the direction and the amplitude of the interfacial jetting of a sessile drop of liquid on non-piezoelectric materials is demonstrated.

    6. Intrinsically Colored and Luminescent Silk (pages 1463–1466)

      Natalia C. Tansil, Yang Li, Choon Peng Teng, Shuangyuan Zhang, Khin Yin Win, Xing Chen, Xiang Yang Liu and Ming-Yong Han

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003860

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Various intrinsically colored and luminescent silks are produced in vivo through the direct uptake of dyes into silkworms. A better understanding is established to select and design functional materials for effective uptake into silk fibroin by controlling structure-dependent hydrophobicity and self-assembly capabilities.

    7. A Free-Standing Pt-Nanowire Membrane as a Highly Stable Electrocatalyst for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (pages 1467–1471)

      Hai-Wei Liang, Xiang Cao, Fei Zhou, Chun-Hua Cui, Wen-Jun Zhang and Shu-Hong Yu

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004377

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A free-standing Pt-nanowire membrane fabricated via a multistep templating process is used as an electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). It exhibits remarkably high stability and good catalytic activity due to its unique nanowire-network structure.

  8. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. 3D Tissue Architectures: Molding Cell Beads for Rapid Construction of Macroscopic 3D Tissue Architecture (Adv. Mater. 12/2011) (page H1)

      Yukiko T. Matsunaga, Yuya Morimoto and Shoji Takeuchi

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190040

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A microfluidic system was used to prepare a large number of size-controlled collagen gel beads to form microtissue units, “cell beads”, as tissue building blocks. By stacking cell beads into a doll-shaped silicone chamber, millimeter-thick tissue with uniform cell density was formed rapidly. The bead structure allowed the application into the 3D printing, achieving automated geometrical control of the formed tissues for the fabrication of functional complex tissues. on p. H90

  9. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Cancer Research: Nanomaterials: Applications in Cancer Imaging and Therapy (Adv. Mater. 12/2011) (page H2)

      José A. Barreto, William O’Malley, Manja Kubeil, Bim Graham, Holger Stephan and Leone Spiccia

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190041

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The number of applications of nano materials in cancer diagnosis and therapy is increasing everyday, providing non-invasive methods to approach cancer treatment. This review describes the tumor properties and physicochemical parameters that are important for tumor-targeted nanoparticle design. It provides an overview of different types of state-of-the-art nanoparticles, and identifies opportunities for the further development of nanoparticles as cancer diagnostic and therapeutic agents. on p. H18

  10. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 12/2011) (pages H4–H6)

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190042

  11. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

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    5. Correction
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    7. Correspondences
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    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
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  12. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
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    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
  13. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
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    5. Correction
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    7. Correspondences
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    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
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    1. Nanomaterials: Applications in Cancer Imaging and Therapy (pages H18–H40)

      José A. Barreto, William O’Malley, Manja Kubeil, Bim Graham, Holger Stephan and Leone Spiccia

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100140

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The number of applications of nano­materials in cancer diagnosis and therapy is increasing everyday, providing non-invasive methods to approach cancer treatment. This review describes the tumor properties and physicochemical parameters that are important for tumor-targeted nanoparticle design. It provides an overview of different types of state-of-the-art nanoparticles, and identifies opportunities for the further development of nanoparticles as cancer diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

  14. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
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    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
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    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
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    1. Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications (pages H41–H56)

      Jason A. Burdick and Glenn D. Prestwich

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003963

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hydrogel biomaterials based on hyaluronic acid are formed with a wide range of diverse chemistry and processing techniques. This versatility in material design has led to application of these materials in fields of tissue regeneration and drug delivery with structures of gels, fibers, and porous substrates.

    2. Biomimetic Smart Interface Materials for Biological Applications (pages H57–H77)

      Taolei Sun and Guangyan Qing

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004326

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A promising platform to realize special biofunctionalities and excellent controllability over the surface properties of smart biointerface materials is provided by the hydrogen-bonding-mediated rever­sible coil/globule transition of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) film. Copolymerization with other functional units and/or combination with other materials provide tools for a wide variety of attractive biological and biomedical applications (see graphic).

  15. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
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    1. MICROFLUIDICS: Synthesis of Size-Tunable Polymeric Nanoparticles Enabled by 3D Hydrodynamic Flow Focusing in Single-Layer Microchannels (Adv. Mater. 12/2011) (page H78)

      Minsoung Rhee, Pedro M. Valencia, Maria I. Rodriguez, Robert Langer, Omid C. Farokhzad and Rohit Karnik

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190043

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Robust microfluidic synthesis of polymer nanoparticles based on nanoprecipitation is reported by Omid C. Farokhzad, Rohit Karnik, and co-workers on p. H79. 3D hydrodynamic flow focusing, realized by constructing three sequential inlets for vertical focusing followed by a conventional cross junction for horizontal focusing, isolates the polymer precursors from the channelwalls, both vertically and horizontally.

  16. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

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    5. Correction
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    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
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    1. Synthesis of Size-Tunable Polymeric Nanoparticles Enabled by 3D Hydrodynamic Flow Focusing in Single-Layer Microchannels (pages H79–H83)

      Minsoung Rhee, Pedro M. Valencia, Maria I. Rodriguez, Robert Langer, Omid C. Farokhzad and Rohit Karnik

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004333

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A versatile microfluidic platform to synthesize NPs by nanoprecipitation using 3D hydrodynamic flow focusing isolates the precipitating precursors from channel walls, eliminating fouling of the channels. It is shown that this new method enables robust nanoprecipitation without polymer aggregation, regardless of the polymer molecular weight or precursor concentration implemented, where the size of the resulting polymeric NPs is tunable.

    2. RGD-Modified PEG-PAMAM-DOX Conjugate: In Vitro and In Vivo Targeting to Both Tumor Neovascular Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells (pages H84–H89)

      Saijie Zhu, Lili Qian, Minghuang Hong, Lihong Zhang, Yuanying Pei and Yanyan Jiang

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003944

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel multifunctional drug–polymer conjugate is prepared. RGD peptide is used to actively target the drug delivery system to tumor neovascular endothelial cells and tumor cells, while the PEG-PAMAM polymeric carrier permits passive targeting to the tumor site by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Controlled release of the anticancer drug doxorubicin is also achieved via acid-sensitive cis-aconityl linkage.

    3. Molding Cell Beads for Rapid Construction of Macroscopic 3D Tissue Architecture (pages H90–H94)

      Yukiko T. Matsunaga, Yuya Morimoto and Shoji Takeuchi

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004375

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A microfluidic system was used to prepare a large number of size-controlled collagen gel beads to form microtissue units, “cell beads”, as tissue building blocks. By stacking cell beads into a doll-shaped silicone chamber, millimeter-thick tissue with uniform cell density was formed rapidly. The bead structure allowed the application into the 3D printing, achieving automated geometrical control of the formed tissues for the fabrication of functional complex tissues.

    4. A Novel Family of Biodegradable Poly(ester amide) Elastomers (pages H95–H100)

      Hao Cheng, Paulina S. Hill, Daniel J. Siegwart, Nathaniel Vacanti, Abigail K. R. Lytton-Jean, Seung-Woo Cho, Anne Ye, Robert Langer and Daniel G. Anderson

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003482

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biodegradable elastomeric materials have particular utility in tissue engineering applications because their compliance under force closely resembles the elastic nature of many human tissues. A family of biodegradable poly(ester amide) elastomers were developed, with excellent elasticity under hydrated conditions, good in vivo biocompatibility and a slow degradation rate. This study sheds light on the structure-property relationship behind designing biodegradable elastomeric materials.

    5. Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence to Quantify Bacterial Adhesion (pages H101–H104)

      Kangwon Lee, Lewis D. Hahn, William W. Yuen, Hera Vlamakis, Roberto Kolter and David J. Mooney

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004096

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A metal-enhanced fluorescence assay enables z-tracking of cell adhesion on surfaces. It is based on a significant enhancement in the fluorescence of labeled bacteria upon approaching a surface and can be used to quantitatively define cell adhesion based on the nanoscale distance between the cells and the surfaces.

    6. Cell-Based Drug Delivery Devices Using Phagocytosis-Resistant Backpacks (pages H105–H109)

      Nishit Doshi, Albert J. Swiston, Jonathan B. Gilbert, Maria L. Alcaraz, Robert E. Cohen, Michael F. Rubner and Samir Mitragotri

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004074

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Macrophages are recruited at the diseased site in several pathological conditions. Here, we describe a novel method of utilizing their unique properties for targeted drug delivery. Cellular backpacks are designed that ride on macrophage surfaces without affecting cell functions or getting internalized. These backpacks can be used as multimodal therapeutic and diagnostic agents.

  17. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. DRUG DELIVERY: Presentation of BMP-2 from a Soft Biopolymeric Film Unveils its Activity on Cell Adhesion and Migration (Adv. Mater. 12/2011) (page H110)

      Thomas Crouzier, Laure Fourel, Thomas Boudou, Corinne Albigès-Rizo and Catherine Picart

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190038

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Focal adhesions, induced by “matrixbound BMP-2” presented from soft films, are reported by Catherine Picart and co-workers on p. H111. The authors found that C2C12 myoblasts cultured on soft films without BMP-2 were poorly spread and did not exhibit focal adhesions, while the presence of matrix-bound BMP- 2 (image) induced a rapid and drastic increase in cell spreading associated with the presence of focal adhesions.

  18. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Presentation of BMP-2 from a Soft Biopolymeric Film Unveils its Activity on Cell Adhesion and Migration (pages H111–H118)

      Thomas Crouzier, Laure Fourel, Thomas Boudou, Corinne Albigès-Rizo and Catherine Picart

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004637

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The dramatic effect of morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), presented to cells in a “matrix bound” manner is described. BMP-2 is either delivered in solution or bound to a thin film made of poly(lysine) and hyaluronan. In this later case only, a striking effect of BMP-2 on cell adhesion and migration is observed.

    2. Oppositely Charged Gelatin Nanospheres as Building Blocks for Injectable and Biodegradable Gels (pages H119–H124)

      Huanan Wang, Morten B. Hansen, Dennis W. P. M. Löwik, Jan C. M. van Hest, Yubao Li, John A. Jansen and Sander C. G. Leeuwenburgh

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003908

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Injectable and biodegradable gels have been formed by a bottom-up synthesis strategy employing oppositely charged gelatin nanospheres as particulate building blocks. These gels are formed by electrostatic interactions between and tight packing of gelatin nanospheres of opposite charge. Due to their favorable clinical handling, ease of functionalization, and cost-effectiveness, these gels show great potential as injectable gels for tissue regeneration.

  19. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Editorial
    7. Correspondences
    8. Communications
    9. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    13. Essay “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    14. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    15. Progress Reports “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    16. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    17. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    18. Frontispiece “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    19. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    20. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Bioimaging: Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence to Quantify Bacterial Adhesion (Adv. Mater. 12/2011) (page H126)

      Kangwon Lee, Lewis D. Hahn, William W. Yuen, Hera Vlamakis, Roberto Kolter and David J. Mooney

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190039

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A metal-enhanced fluorescence assay enables z-tracking of cell adhesion on surfaces. It is based on a significant enhancement in the fluorescence of labeled bacteria upon approaching a surface and can be used to quantitatively defi ne cell adhesion based on the nanoscale distance between the cells and the surfaces. on p. H101

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