Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 13

April 5, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 13

Pages 1475–1571

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. Graphene: Interface Engineering of Layer-by-Layer Stacked Graphene Anodes for High-Performance Organic Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 13/2011) (page 1475)

      Yu Wang, Shi Wun Tong, Xiang Fan Xu, Barbaros Özyilmaz and Kian Ping Loh

      Article first published online: 29 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190044

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Possessing the advantages of transparency, con-ductivity, and flexibility, graphene is a serious alter-native to indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes in solar cells and may serve as a sustainable electrode. By performing interface engineering of layer-by-layer stacked graphene on glass, Kian Ping Loh and co-workers demonstrate on p. 1514 that organic solar cells with a power conversion efficiency approaching that of ITO can be attained.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. Patterning: Templated Solid-State Dewetting to Controllably Produce Complex Patterns (Adv. Mater. 13/2011) (page 1476)

      Jongpil Ye and Carl V. Thompson

      Article first published online: 29 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190045

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      When single-crystal films dewet, crystalline ani-sotropy leads to the formation of patterns with regular characteristics. Lithographically pre-pat-terned films form complex structures with smaller dimensions than the original pattern, as reported by Carl V. Thompson and co-workers on p. 1567. The shape of the initial pattern affects the nature of the dewetted structure in a deterministic way, providing a new approach to complex structure formation through pattern-templated solid-state dewetting.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 13/2011) (pages 1477–1481)

      Article first published online: 29 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190046

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. Emerging Transparent Electrodes Based on Thin Films of Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene, and Metallic Nanostructures (pages 1482–1513)

      David S. Hecht, Liangbing Hu and Glen Irvin

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003188

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      Transparent conductive materials are an integral part of many modern devices including LCDs, solar cells, OLEDs, and touchscreens. This article reviews current trends in emerging nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, and metallic nanowires, with a focus on the electrical, optical, and mechanical properties of each material, and its suitability for various applications.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. Interface Engineering of Layer-by-Layer Stacked Graphene Anodes for High-Performance Organic Solar Cells (pages 1514–1518)

      Yu Wang, Shi Wun Tong, Xiang Fan Xu, Barbaros Özyilmaz and Kian Ping Loh

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003673

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An interface engineering process to deploy graphene film as the anode in poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):[6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM)-based polymer solar cells is demonstrated. By modifying the interface between the graphene anode and the photoactive layer with MoO3 and poly(3,4-ethylenedioythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), the power conversion efficiency of the solar cells reaches ≈83.3% of control devices that use an indium tin oxide (ITO) anode.

    2. Highly Ordered Mixed Protein Patterns Over Large Areas from Self-Assembly of Binary Colloids (pages 1519–1523)

      Gurvinder Singh, Saju Pillai, Ayyoob Arpanaei and Peter Kingshott

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004657

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel single step method is developed for patterning multiple proteins within self-assembled binary colloidal crystal patterns. Self-assembly takes place by confining the suspensions in which either one or both types of particles are coated separately with proteins prior to mixing. This method offers precise control over the spacing between the proteins and the pattern size over large areas without any involvement of expensive lithographic techniques.

    3. Co-Continuous Composite Materials for Stiffness, Strength, and Energy Dissipation (pages 1524–1529)

      Lifeng Wang, Jacky Lau, Edwin L. Thomas and Mary C. Boyce

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003956

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      Co-continuous polymer composite materials are designed and fabricated to achieve enhancements in stiffness, strength, and energy dissipation. The mutual constraints between two phases of the co-continuous structure enable enhanced dissipation by spreading of the plastic deformation and by containing cracking leading to a multitude of non-catastrophic dissipative events, which also provides damage tolerance of the co-continuous composites.

    4. Atomic-Scale Evolution of Local Electronic Structure Across Multiferroic Domain Walls (pages 1530–1534)

      Ya-Ping Chiu, Yu-Ting Chen, Bo-Chao Huang, Min-Chuan Shih, Jan-Chi Yang, Qing He, Chen-Wei Liang, Jan Seidel, Yi-Chun Chen, Ramamoorthy Ramesh and Ying-Hao Chu

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004143

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Direct evidence of the electronic config­urations across domain walls in BiFeO3 is quantitatively characterized by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy. Atomic-scale band evolution and the asymmetrically built-in potential barrier at domain boundaries are demonstrated. The 109° domain walls register a remarkable decrease in the bandgap, suggesting a new route to control the local conducting channels within 2 nm.

    5. Soluble and Stable N-Heteropentacenes with High Field-Effect Mobility (pages 1535–1539)

      Zhixiong Liang, Qin Tang, Jianbin Xu and Qian Miao

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004325

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An exploratory study on a group of silylethynylated N-heteropentacenes as soluble and stable organic semiconductors is presented. An interesting finding is that a silylethynylated N-heteropentacene can function as a p-type, n-type, or ambipolar organic semiconductor depending on the structure of its π-backbone. The tetraazapentacene derivative is one of the best performing n-type organic semiconductors with an electron mobility of up to 3.3 cm2 V−1 s−1.

    6. 3D Bulk Ordering in Macroscopic Solid Opaline Films by Edge-Induced Rotational Shearing (pages 1540–1544)

      Chris E. Finlayson, Peter Spahn, David R. E. Snoswell, Gabrielle Yates, Andreas Kontogeorgos, Andrew I. Haines, G. Peter Hellmann and Jeremy J. Baumberg

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003934

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Permanent ordering of sub-micrometer polymeric spheres by edge rotational shearing is reported. The resulting high-quality, bulk, 3D-ordered polymer opal thin-films exhibit strikingly intense, tuneable structural color, which is applicable for photonics, metamaterials, nanoassembly, and structural color applications

    7. Room-Temperature Electrical Addressing of a Bistable Spin-Crossover Molecular System (pages 1545–1549)

      Ferry Prins, María Monrabal-Capilla, Edgar A. Osorio, Eugenio Coronado and Herre S. J. van der Zant

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003821

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A switchable molecular device is constructed by contacting an individual nanoparticle based on spin-crossover molecules between nanometer-spaced electrodes. The switching and memory effects near room temperature are a consequence of the intrinsic bistability of the nanoparticle. Interestingly, for molecular spintronics, the spin crossover can also be induced by applying a voltage, showing that its magnetic state is electrically controllable.

    8. Protein Tethering into Multiscale Geometries by Covalent Subtractive Printing (pages 1550–1553)

      Sean R. Coyer, Emmanuel Delamarche and Andrés J. García

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003744

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-resolution patterns of proteins at multiple length scales are printed by a facile and flexible strategy using a flat elastomeric stamp and direct covalent immobilization onto mixed self-assembled monolayers of tri(ethylene glycol)- and carboxylic acid–hexa(ethylene glycol)-terminated alkanethiols on gold-coated substrates. This is a robust method for generating complex protein arrays with precise control over micrometer- and nanometer-scale pattern geometries while maintaining a protein-adsorption-resistant background.

    9. A Solution-Processable Star-Shaped Molecule for High-Performance Organic Solar Cells (pages 1554–1557)

      Huixia Shang, Haijun Fan, Yao Liu, Wenping Hu, Yongfang Li and Xiaowei Zhan

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004445

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new 3D, star-shaped, donor–acceptor–donor (D–A–D) small molecule with triphenylamine as the core and donor unit, benzothiadiazole as the bridge and acceptor unit, and hexylterthiophene as the arm and donor unit is synthesized. Photovoltaic devices based on the blend of this compound and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (PC71BM) exhibited power conversion efficiencies as high as 4.3%, which is among the highest reported for solution-processed organic solar cells based on small molecules.

    10. Reduced Graphene Oxide Electrodes for Large Area Organic Electronics (pages 1558–1562)

      Paul H. Wöbkenberg, Goki Eda, Dong-Seok Leem, John C. de Mello, Donal D. C. Bradley, Manish Chhowalla and Thomas D. Anthopoulos

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004161

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Interlayer lithography is used to pattern highly conductive, solution-processed, reduced graphene oxide source and drain electrodes down to 10 μm gaps. These patterned electrodes allow for the fabrication of high-performance organic thin-film transistors and complementary circuits. The method offers a viable route towards organic electronics fabricated entirely by solution processing.

    11. Honeycomb-Structured Silicon: Remarkable Morphological Changes Induced by Electrochemical (De)Lithiation (pages 1563–1566)

      Loïc Baggetto, Dmitry Danilov and Peter H. L. Notten

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003665

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Arrays of silicon honeycombs are evaluated as a negative electrode material for lithium-ion microbatteries. The morphological changes of the structure are investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and it is revealed that the honeycomb structure can reversibly withstand huge mechanical deformations. Free-standing structures are envisioned to serve advanced future applications, such as switchable sieves and microelectromechanical systems.

    12. Templated Solid-State Dewetting to Controllably Produce Complex Patterns (pages 1567–1571)

      Jongpil Ye and Carl V. Thompson

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004095

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Templated formation of complex patterns via solid-state dewetting is demonstrated. Thin films often dewet from their substrates when they are heated, even while remaining in the solid state throughout the process. It is shown that solid-state dewetting of epitaxial films can be templated through lithographic pre-patterning, so as to reproducibly form complex structures with sub lithographic feature sizes.

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